Read Afrekete: An Anthology of Black Lesbian Writing by Catherine E. McKinley L. Joyce DeLaney Carolivia Herron Jewelle L. Gómez Jamika Ajalon Jackie Goldsby Pat Parker Michelle Cliff Online

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Destined to become a classic in the tradition of the best-selling Black-Eyed Susans/Midnight Birds and Erotique Noire/ Black Erotica. Afrekete gives collective voice to the tradition of black lesbian writing. In the vast and proliferating area of both African-American and lesbian and gay writing, the work of black lesbians is most often excluded or relegated to the marginsDestined to become a classic in the tradition of the best-selling Black-Eyed Susans/Midnight Birds and Erotique Noire/ Black Erotica. Afrekete gives collective voice to the tradition of black lesbian writing. In the vast and proliferating area of both African-American and lesbian and gay writing, the work of black lesbians is most often excluded or relegated to the margins. Afrekete meshes these seemingly disparate traditions and celebrates black lesbian experiences in all their variety and depth.Elegant, timely, provocative, and inspiring, the fiction, poetry, and nonfiction in Afrekete -- written in a range of styles -- engage a variety of highly topical themes, placing them at the center of literary and social discourse. Beginning with "Tar Beach," an excerpt from Audre Lorde's celebrated memoir Zami: A New Spelling of My Name, which introduces the character Afrekete, the collection also includes such prominent writers as Michelle Cliff, Carolivia Herron, Jewelle Gomez, and Alexis De Veaux. Other pieces are by Jacqueline Woodson, Sapphire, Essence editor Linda Villarosa, and filmmaker Michelle Parkerson, with other contributions by exciting new writers Cynthia Bond, Jocelyn Taylor, Jamika Ajalon, and Sharee Nash.Afrekete is a collection whose time has come. It is an extraordinary work, one of lasting value for all lovers of literature. A fresh, engaging journey, Afrekete will both inform and delight.Contents:Tar beach by Audre LordeAmerican dreams by SapphireTestimony of a naked woman by Jocelyn Maria TaylorWater call by Helen Elaine LeeTuesday, August third by Jacqueline WoodsonDear Aunt Nanadine by Alexis De VeauxOdds and ends by Michelle ParkersonWhat has yet to be sung by Malkia CyrilThe old lady by Carolivia HerronWink of an eye by Jewelle GomezKaleidoscope by Jamika AjalonQueen for 307 days by Jackie GoldsbyWhere will you be? by Pat ParkerScreen memory by Michelle CliffRevelations by Linda VillarosaRuby by Cynthia BondDare by Melanie HopeTake care by Sharee NashOde to Aretha by Evelyn C. WhiteToday is not the day by Audre Lorde...

Title : Afrekete: An Anthology of Black Lesbian Writing
Author :
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ISBN : 9780385473552
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 336 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Afrekete: An Anthology of Black Lesbian Writing Reviews

  • Fikri
    2019-01-21 17:23

    Catherine E. McKinley introduces this book as such:”The contributors and these editors identify as lesbian, gay, zamis, dykes, queers, Black, African, African-American, biracial—and often may use these terms and others interchangeably. And while sexuality, or race for that matter, is and is not always at the center of their work, both deeply inform the writer’s vision. The work featured is written in a range of styles, a breadth of aesthetics reflecting the birthing and meshing of seemingly disparate artistic sensibilities and traditions: Black and queer, as well as others.And it does deliver exactly on that, though I found myself wishing for tighter curation as the variation among the stories was too much for me to fully enjoy the whole collection. Some clear favourites emerged though: I loved Jacqueline Woodson’s Tuesday, August Third and learnt a lot from Jackie Goldsby’s Queen for 307 Days.I’m conscious that I’m reviewing this book with the immense privilege of having read it almost 24 years after it was first published, now in an age where queer Black literature is a lot more readily found (though ofc the publishing scene is still far from ideal). This means that say, the Biblical back-and-forth in Linda Villarosa’s Revelations — as the author and her detractors trade quotes from scripture on homosexuality — represents discourse so familiar to me now it no longer comes across as revelatory. I’m also aware that I’m approaching it as a non-Black reader, i.e. arguably not the primary audience for which this book is intended, so I do appreciate its importance situated in the time and place in which it was published even if it might not personally speak to me.

  • HeavyReader
    2019-02-01 23:35

    It's been years since I read this book, but I was really excited to find it at a used bookstore in New Orleans and sad and perplexed to find that it had been removed from the circulation of the New Orleans public library. What's up with that?I remember being impressed...

  • Angélique (Angel)
    2019-02-13 00:46

    4 1/2 Stars. As an aspiring writer who is also a Black same gender loving woman, I found this collection intimately inspiring and restorative. The works in this collection are diverse, sensual, authentic, poetic, and provocative. They are both comforting and challenging. Soothing yet jarring. I highly recommend this book not only to other Black SGL women but also to anyone who is interested in diverse perspectives on love, identity, justice, and the struggle of living fully.

  • Maya White-Lurie
    2019-02-10 22:46

    A great collection of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction. Good variety of style.Trigger warning for sexual assault and violence.

  • Ryan Mishap
    2019-01-30 20:49

    Important, startling stories and essays.