Read Great River: The Rio Grande in North American History by Paul Horgan Online

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Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for History (1954)Winner of the Bancroft Prize in History (1954)Winner of both the Pulitzer Prize and Bancroft Prize for History, Great River was hailed as a literary masterpiece and enduring classic when it first appeared in 1954. It is an epic history of four civilizations--Native American, Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo-American--that people thWinner of the Pulitzer Prize for History (1954)Winner of the Bancroft Prize in History (1954)Winner of both the Pulitzer Prize and Bancroft Prize for History, Great River was hailed as a literary masterpiece and enduring classic when it first appeared in 1954. It is an epic history of four civilizations--Native American, Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo-American--that people the Southwest through ten centuries. With the skill of a novelist, the veracity of a scholar, and the love of a long-time resident, Paul Horgan describes the Rio Grande, its role in human history, and the overlapping cultures that have grown up alongside it or entered into conflict over the land it traverses. Now in its fourth revised edition, Great River remains a monumental part of American historical writing....

Title : Great River: The Rio Grande in North American History
Author :
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ISBN : 9780819562517
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 1038 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Great River: The Rio Grande in North American History Reviews

  • Janie
    2019-05-17 05:05

    Recommended by David McCullough.

  • Mark
    2019-05-18 08:51

    "There was no record but memory and it became tradition and then legend and then religion." Then Paul Horgan compiled the religion and called it history. This book is initially promising, with language and delivery impressive enough that I was willing to forgive it the abstract and mythological way it deals with the lifestyles of prehistorical Americans. Unfortunately, with the entry of Europeans the book falls in line like a jackbooted soldier for the Holy Roman Empire. It isn't long before we're lauding the conversion of ignorant savages and reciting miracles with an air of utter factualness.These anecdotes are integral to history and to the way European society melded with American. However it seems like bad history and bad ethics to be so uncritical of one's source material as Horgan is - if his book was just a slick recapitulation of accounts I would have been able to accept it on that level, as long as this was stated as such. But he goes on to interpret the events in their terms, to champion their efforts to the point of propaganda. I have the sense that the current Catholic pope would happily write a less dogmatic account on the subject, including the portrayal of his own predecessors.My specific objections to the author's interpretations are less of a concern than that his slavish adherence to the letter and tone of his sources renders the whole project suspicious at best. There are few alternate accounts and no attempts at substantiation. There is accordingly no sense of truth or likelihood and its arguments are not much advanced from those of the tales' initial authors.

  • David R.
    2019-05-03 13:03

    A monumental history of the mangy changes of civilization along the Rio Grande from the golden age of Pueblo culture to the frictions between the U.S. and Mexico in the early 20th century. Along the way we meet conquistadors, friars, explorers, filibusters, warriors, and farmers. The language is wonderful: even the most rigorously historical segments evoke a dreamy quality. I could easily imagine the very tenor of a river cutting through dry country. Take your time! This one is huge, but well worth the read.

  • Greg
    2019-05-18 13:16

    A must read, if the river has in any way ever shaped your life that you're aware of. Read it anyway if you've lived within 200 miles of it, because if you had, the river and the peoples who have come to live on it has probably has influenced you in ways you're likely not even aware. I wish I could find this same type of history, in terms of depth and richness, for many other "geographical/sociological" regions, as Horgan did so uniquely, and so thoroughly, for the Rio Grande.

  • Patricia
    2019-05-06 09:04

    I have to admit, this is one of the few books that I finally gave up on. Much too much detail for my purposes. Well written history of the Rio Grande and I would have completed it if I were writing a paper on the area. As it was, I was looking for more of an overview.

  • Kurt
    2019-05-15 05:51

    How persistent the Spanish explorers of the Rio Grande were. While America was being founded between Boston and Philadelphia, great things were happening 2,000 miles away on a muddy river in what would later be called New Mexico.

  • Tony Gualtieri
    2019-04-28 06:52

    A leisurely, comprehensive, and novelistic history of New Mexico and Texas from the earliest times up to the Mexican revolution. Some of the observations of national character are outdated, but these are obvious and more than made up for by passages of beautiful prose and brilliant storytelling.

  • Robert Jr.
    2019-04-27 04:47

    won the Pulitzer Prize...the best book ever written on the history of the Rio Grande River..a must read for all people in the southwest

  • Rose Williams
    2019-05-15 13:07

    Highly readable but rather fictionalized account of the history which took place along this river in the development of the United States.