Read Deculturalization and the Struggle for Equality: A Brief History of the Education of Dominated Cultures in the United States by Joel Spring Online

deculturalization-and-the-struggle-for-equality-a-brief-history-of-the-education-of-dominated-cultures-in-the-united-states

This text is a concise history of Anglo American racism and school policies affecting dominated groups in the United States. It focuses on the educational, legal, and social construction of race and racism, and on educational practices related to deculturalization, segregation, and the civil rights movement. Spring emphasizes issues of power and control in schools and showThis text is a concise history of Anglo American racism and school policies affecting dominated groups in the United States. It focuses on the educational, legal, and social construction of race and racism, and on educational practices related to deculturalization, segregation, and the civil rights movement. Spring emphasizes issues of power and control in schools and shows how the dominant Anglo class has stripped away the culture of minority peoples in the U.S. and replaced it with the dominant culture. In the process, he gives voice to the often-overlooked perspectives of African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, and Native Americans. An understanding of these historical perspectives and how they impact current conditions and policies is critical to teacher's success or failure in today's diverse classrooms....

Title : Deculturalization and the Struggle for Equality: A Brief History of the Education of Dominated Cultures in the United States
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780073131771
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 168 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Deculturalization and the Struggle for Equality: A Brief History of the Education of Dominated Cultures in the United States Reviews

  • Sarah
    2018-11-22 02:34

    In the first chapter, the author was very one-sided and angry. He is Native American, so I understand his aggression. If I did not have to read this for a class, I would have put it down after a few pages because the author is deliberately slanted. In the second chapter, Spring calms down, and the book moves along very well. He deftly covers the subject of forced assimilation and deculturization on non-white cultures since the 1700's. It is not the definitive word on this type of treatment because I believe every story has 2 sides, but it is definitely worth reading. There were many things I was unaware of before I read this book. This book is relevant because of our current situation with illegal immigrants. It may just change a few opinions.

  • Carrie
    2018-12-03 23:46

    The book was full of relevant information, but the content was disorganized at times. Some supporting facts had little to do with the topic of the paragraph, at other times content from several pages early was written again. Most of all, it felt like Spring was in a place to write the history of the Native Americans but was guessing at other areas of the book. Oh, and a personal pet peeve, Wikipedia should never be used as a source in an informational text of this level. Take the time to find a reliable source or don't include the information.

  • Gillian Bourassa
    2018-11-13 02:29

    At times, I felt like Spring was beating a dead horse (pardon the dubiously appropriate idiom) in detailing the ways in which minority groups have suffered discrimination in US education, but I did learn some new information about the subject. It's a decent introduction to anyone who isn't very familiar with the subject.

  • Sally
    2018-11-16 23:26

    This book studies only three cultures dominated through educational policies of the US - Native Americans, Puerto Ricans, and African-Americans. Fantasticlly educational read, if not quite an encompassing perspective. Spring shines when talking about his own culture in particular. I'm glad I read this, yet I feel enlightened and ashamed at the same time.

  • Pete
    2018-11-18 23:37

    Spring and Zinn are kindred spirits, I believe.

  • Lisa
    2018-11-20 20:40

    I enjoyed this book. The author gives a brief telling of the history of deculturalization education policies in relation to a few of the major non-white groups in the United States. It's interesting and straightforward, though perhaps not as exhaustive as some readers might hope. I would recommend it if you're interested in the topic of how education is used as a tool to bolster and maintain dominant culture in this country.

  • Grace Johnson
    2018-12-10 19:44

    Very eye-opening and thought-provoking. However Spring had a very angry tone and was quite biased. Still worth a read especially if going into education. I only wish the chapters were shorter and his thoughts more organized.

  • Amanda Heck
    2018-11-13 20:29

    Often overly repetitive, but very informative and eye-opening.

  • Patrice
    2018-11-14 19:39

    This book details how American education has been used as a tool of oppression and subjugation and for the cultural and linguistic genocide of minority groups in the United States, specifically for African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans and Hispanic Americans (Mexican and Puerto Rican).

  • Sky Lea
    2018-12-13 22:31

    This book is very deep and powerful. It talks about the history of Native Americans, African Americans, Mexicans, and Asians and how the english settlers worked to deculturalize these races and commit cultural genocide.

  • Janet
    2018-12-01 19:45

    Minority groups' struggle in the United States and their fight for equal educational opportunities. Interesting, but this book was "brief," especially when it discussed the educational history. It was more of a minority history of the United States book than one pertaining to education.

  • Rose Sybrant
    2018-12-07 20:28

    Reading this book for Diversity in Education! It's very interesting so far.

  • Amy Louise
    2018-11-16 02:50

    Somehow both dry and thought-provoking. Not comprehensive (as its title suggests), but still eye-opening.

  • Jaclyn
    2018-11-16 00:28

    He didn't really say anything. It was like reading a high school history textbook.

  • Zach Rasey
    2018-11-18 18:33

    Basically a rehash of work found in "The American School A global Context"The last chapter is important in the 8th edition, tho. It is easy to read and I would recommend to pre-service teachers.