Read The Roman Army: The Greatest War Machine of the Ancient World by Chris McNab Online

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Chris McNab's latest title for Osprey follows the Roman Army from the first armed citizens of the early Republic through the glorious heights of the Imperial legions to the shameful defeats inflicted upon the late Roman army by the Goths and Huns. Tracing the development of tactics, equipment and training through detailed text, illustrations, diagrams, and photographs, thiChris McNab's latest title for Osprey follows the Roman Army from the first armed citizens of the early Republic through the glorious heights of the Imperial legions to the shameful defeats inflicted upon the late Roman army by the Goths and Huns. Tracing the development of tactics, equipment and training through detailed text, illustrations, diagrams, and photographs, this book will give the reader an accessible yet detailed insight into the military force that enabled Rome to become the greatest empire the world has ever seen, to defeat its enemies, subdue its neighbors and control vast territories.This book describes the organization of the forces, equipment and weaponry, uniforms, and development in tactics and warfare of the Roman Army. Each of the four historical sections will focus on the changes in the army, but will also look at the talented men who transformed and led the army, such as Scipio Africanus, Caesar and Marcus Aurelius, and the momentous battles fought, including Cannae, Pharsalus, and Adrianople....

Title : The Roman Army: The Greatest War Machine of the Ancient World
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781849081627
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 280 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Roman Army: The Greatest War Machine of the Ancient World Reviews

  • Myke Cole
    2018-09-17 09:49

    One of the best books on Roman military organization that I've ever read. It is aimed entirely at those interested in the minutiae of military order-of-battle, arms and equipment, TTPs (Tactics, Techniques and Procedures), marching order, military administration and the other kinds of details that truly give you possession of the subject and an intimate understanding of what it was like to fight for, or against, Rome.The book even avoids tracking major campaigns or battles, and it cannot be faulted for this. The subject is so enormous that to try to encompass it all in a single volume would produce a book that could dwarf a Brandon Sanderson tome. Because of this totally understandable choice, it's a bit less satisfying, as it sets up the military so brilliantly for the reader, who is left disappointed when the force they've just studied doesn't really go into action the way they'd like.It is a book clearly aimed at wargamers, monographical deep-diving historians, and (hooray) current and former military service members who are looking to see the roots of their own organizations in the Rome of Romulus, the Republic, or the Emperors. Well worth your time.

  • Robert Mccarthy
    2018-09-20 07:51

    Definitely utilitarian in its aspect. I was hoping for a little bit on the religious and social history of the Roman Legions, as well as more concise information on the Auxiliary (later to be known as the Foederati) corps of the legion, those foreign levies, mercenaries and specialist troops who fought just as hard as the citizen legionaries. Chris McNab does however provide the reader with a wealth of information on the organization of the Roman Legions i.e. the various ranks and their functions. He also provides the reader with a description, replete with historical recreations and archaeological photos, of Roman military equipment. The photos/illustrations were a real deal breaker in my opinion. McNab also presents short histories of campaigns and individual military engagements. The text is divided into easy digest periods of Roman history from the early monarchical period (surprisingly, I haven't seen a lot of books on this subject try to tackle that) all the way through to the fall of the Western Roman Empire, albeit with a short foray into the early Byzantine period.

  • Steven Peterson
    2018-09-26 13:56

    I am used to the brief Osprey volumes on military matters. This work, however, is much longer, featuring 265 pages of text. It covers the time when the first evidence for the nature of the Roman Army is available (the reign of Servius Tullus) to the end of the Western Empire centuries later.Even with 265 pages, that leaves rather little time for great detail on any stage in the evolution of the Roman military. Nonetheless, a nicely written volume that provides a sense of the Roman Army as it evolved and came to its end.

  • Jonathan
    2018-09-13 09:52

    Excellent overview of the Roman Army from day one till end. Included are excellent maps, photos, and art from Osprey. Very nice read.

  • Hashim Al-Zain
    2018-09-22 07:38

    A good portrayal of a once great empire!

  • Cash Guyer
    2018-09-09 11:41

    I learned about how Romans wrecked barbarians