Read The No-Nonsense Guide to Tourism by Pamela Nowicka Online

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This guide demystifies the often invisible impacts of global tourism, one of the biggest industries in the world, from labor conditions to development by stealth, to the role of elites and the cultural impacts on both the visitor and the visited.It also takes in themes such as the gap year and the role of travel and vacations in Western cultures, and examines the “happy smThis guide demystifies the often invisible impacts of global tourism, one of the biggest industries in the world, from labor conditions to development by stealth, to the role of elites and the cultural impacts on both the visitor and the visited.It also takes in themes such as the gap year and the role of travel and vacations in Western cultures, and examines the “happy smiling faces” syndrome and asks whether this is just a reworking of old colonial relationships.Pamela Nowicka is a journalist and consultant writing on numerous tourism and ethics subjects....

Title : The No-Nonsense Guide to Tourism
Author :
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ISBN : 9781904456605
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 144 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The No-Nonsense Guide to Tourism Reviews

  • Daniel Roy
    2018-09-14 13:30

    This book makes a very important point about tourism: it has its consequences on the world, and what is often depicted as an agent for peace and intercultural communication is really another form of neoliberal commercial imperialism. That's a genuinely good point, and one for which I'm glad I read this book. This is important stuff.That being said, I find problems with the format of the book, not its central point. First off, it would have worked better as a 10-page exposé instead of a complete book. The arguments end up going in circles, and there are times when the author devolves into preaching instead of providing data. Second, the layout and format of the book is confusing. Headers are everywhere and break the flow of the book, and sidebars clutter the book, frequently interrupting the author's arguments. Thirdly, the name of the series itself is misleading: "No-Nonsense Guide" implies an impartial information source, but this is really a lot more of an essay by the author.Ultimately, the book contains important information and critical food for thought, on a topic that is completely disregarded by mainstream media. I just wish it had been written in a more compelling, and less preachy manner, so it could reach a lot more people than this book can. Still, critical reading if you're a frequent leisure traveler. You might not like what it has to say, but it has to be said.

  • Amy
    2018-09-13 13:54

    This book has got to be one of the most cynical books I have read in a while. Nowicka explains how detrimental the tourism industry is to the world not only environmentally, but economically, and mentally. She tells us that tourism is consumerism and not, by any means, helpful to the local people. While I appreciate her information and views on tourism, I cannot fully agree that tourism is completely detrimental to the local people. I currently live in Cusco Peru where tourism is the main source of income for many people who live here. There is no way Cusco would be able to thrive economically as it does without the amount of tourists that come through here every year. Hell, my job as an English teacher would not be necessary if there wasn't any tourism. I will agree with Nowicka in that people should do as much as they can to be conscious tourists and stay well informed about the companies that they are using and the hostals and hotels that they are staying in. There is not reason a tourist shouldn't be informed about the culture and history of the places he or she goes.

  • Seamus Enright
    2018-09-14 15:37

    Disappointing flimsy book...It tars all travelers with the brush of high-impact luxury tourism...she's judgmental about people's motives for travelling and Westerners in general...she has a point that many of us do soul-destroying work but then criticises us for going to poorer countries to enjoy a simpler way of life.The last chapter, where she explores ways to be more beneficial to the local communities, is more encouraging, but you have to wade through a lot of self-righteous reverse racism, not to mention reading the same case study of a trinket seller in Tamil Nadu three times over, to get there.

  • Alison
    2018-09-10 14:55

    Interesting book. I agree with much of what the author writes, and I would like to see more on the topic. I also agree that this is more of an essay than a guide, and that it is pretty heavy-handed. Still, an important book.

  • Victoria
    2018-09-09 14:58

    Food for thought. Challenges our society’s view of 'paradise.