Read The Lost Thing by Shaun Tan Online

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A kid finds a lost 'thing' on the beach where he's scavenging for his bottle-top collection. The thing is a large, freakish creature but no-one else really notices it--it's simply not a part of their familiar day-to-day reality. So the kid takes it upon himself to try to find where the lost thing belongs...The Lost Thing is a gently humorous story that will be read and enjA kid finds a lost 'thing' on the beach where he's scavenging for his bottle-top collection. The thing is a large, freakish creature but no-one else really notices it--it's simply not a part of their familiar day-to-day reality. So the kid takes it upon himself to try to find where the lost thing belongs...The Lost Thing is a gently humorous story that will be read and enjoyed by a wide range of ages. While the narrative is full of typical thoughts of an observant and caring young person, the illustrations provide a surreal and thought-provoking backdrop for this 'lost dog story' with a definite twist. The Lost Thing is the first book that Shaun Tan both wrote and illustrated....

Title : The Lost Thing
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781894965101
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 32 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Lost Thing Reviews

  • بثينة العيسى
    2018-11-21 13:27

    كتاب عميق، مؤثر، ويأخذك إلى نقطة بعيدة في داخلك، لكي تفهم نفسك والعالم أكثر. شون تان فيلسوف فذ وكاتب مبدع وفنان عبقري.. كتبه تقرأ أكثر من مرة، خاصة في مواسم الحزن والغربة.

  • A. Dawes
    2018-11-05 08:57

    This incredible book was made into an academy award winning short film. The Australian artist and illustrator, Shaun Tan, is the Midas of the visual world. His innovative illustrations speak volumes.Plot: A boy , still curious due to his youth, discovers an odd creature at the beach, a 'Thing' that appears lost. In this mundane monotonous world of sepia, The Lost Thing, goes by relatively unnoticed. The boy sets out to find the Lost Thing a home. Themes: The Lost Thing explores how curiosity and wonder decay with age, until we, as adults, are simply robotic grey creatures. In a way, we have been conditioned to mirror the colourless world around us. Tan challenges the reader to not follow the many signs and orders that have conditioned us, but rather to witness (and remember) the fantastic that exists. The Lost Thing is highly critical of our need to label and categorise others. Furthermore, it asks us to not accept our adult world, devoid as it is, of individuality. We are becoming an industrialised model, which makes for a dull urbanscape and even duller society. The Lost Thing also questions the marginalisation of subgroups. The Lost Thing itself, as a creature, could symbolically represent so many things: the poorly labeled and mistreated refugee; the individual who lacks acceptance because he/she doesn't fit into the cultural norm; the child-like zest that's missing in our lives; the wonder we fail to see... Shaun Tan is an incredible artist whose pictures are able to capture nostalgia, and the bittersweet sadness that exists in the contemporary world. Rather than superficial princesses and shallow fairy tales, Tan asks us to also reflect upon aspects of life through original illustrations that are humorous, sentimental, poignant and satirical. I'm deeply moved by Tan's work. The Lost Thing is a must read. It's truly marvelous.

  • Trudie
    2018-11-12 10:24

    I am having a moment of going through my collected works of Australian illustrator Shaun Tan. So far this year I have worked my way through what I consider his masterpiece The Arrival and his more recent The Singing Bones. WhileThe Lost Thingis probably not my favourite of his works, it is still an outstanding picture book. There is actually very little to read but you can spend ages pouring over the illustrations including the wonderful background collages of industrial drawings, algebraic equations and engineering text. I think I was most taken with the inside cover of bottle caps each with a tiny technical drawing or equation. This could be read as a simple tale of a Lost Thing in a faceless industrial world but as with all Tan's work it invites more complex analysis. I think it evokes so well those melancholy feelings of being "other", of not fitting into a world that appears to be rushing on without you. It is of note that this was adapted into an Academy award winning animated short film which is also worth tracking down if you enjoy animation.

  • Nadin Adel
    2018-11-19 09:11

    Link for a short movie adaptation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rpak6...

  • Tisha
    2018-11-15 06:24

    Well, actually I finished watching it! As I couldn't find the soft copy anywhere, I just watched the short film that Shaun Tan made from this book and yes, I loved it! That was obvious though! His books never fail to amaze me!! <3

  • Roberto
    2018-10-23 08:23

    E allora?Un ragazzo occhialuto e spettinato nota una strana creatura sulla spiaggia. Una cosa strana, una specie di teiera con i tentacoli. Sembra spaesata, o forse solamente abbandonata. E si lascia avvicinare senza timore dal ragazzo che decide di cercarne il proprietario.I due iniziano quindi a girare per la città in silenzio alla ricerca del Posto per la Cosa smarrita che, apparentemente, nessuno vuole.In questo peregrinare notiamo tante cose strane che riusciremmo a vedere tranquillamente se solo non fossimo sempre così impegnati a pensare ai fatti nostri.Il racconto è molto breve, folgorante. Forse troppo. Disegni meravigliosi (come sempre lo sono quelli di questo autore). E il messaggio è altrettanto chiaro e folgorante. Prendere tempo, vedere dove di solito non guardiamo, rallentare, incuriosirsi per tutto quello che c’è di diverso, sforzarsi di aprire l’angolo di visione, anche se impegni, distrazione e falsi obiettivi ce lo impediranno.E’ curioso che ho letto il libro in modo abbastanza rapido, curandomi soprattutto della storia senza dare troppa importanza ai dettagli. E alla fine sono sbottato in un: “e allora?”Ecco; il libro ci spinge a cercare di evitare di fare proprio questo. Correre per arrivare a una fine per poi chiedersi “e allora?”Grande formato, colori bellissimi, disegni ricchissimi di dettagli, impaginazione accuratissima. Forse però l’efficacia del messaggio è parzialmente compromessa dalla brevità.

  • Lisa Vegan
    2018-11-01 06:21

    Well, I’ve loved the other books I’ve read by this author-illustrator, and he recently won an Oscar for a film adaptation of this book (an Academy Award winning animation short I’ve not seen, yet) so I was sufficiently curious to get and read a copy of the book. And, yes, I want to see the film; I can see it being an excellent short.It’s probably not fair that I compare all Tan’s books with the brilliant The Arrival or even The Red Tree; those books are so amazing. This one is terrific too. Melancholy. Quirky. Funny. About growing up and changes in perspective, and much more. The simple story is written well but it’s the illustrations that shine, although the story does its job because I wouldn’t like the pictures anywhere near as much as I do without the context of the story. There’s so much to view on every page, some of it nonsense. I think. Which is fine; it works. It’s left me rather pensive, but I’m fine with that. Another winner from Tan, in this case his first book. I have to eventually read them all.4 ½ stars

  • Lindsey
    2018-10-28 09:15

    I loved this book. The illustrations are a weird combination of dark/depressing and funny/ironic. It is a dark, mechanical world. Very dystopian, but the characters do normal and very dorky things that make it funny. The text by itself would seem ordinary, which is part of the magic of this book, because it fools the reader into thinking they will see something familiar in the illustration. Of course there is nothing boring or cliche about the illustrations. In fact, it is completely unpredictable: the story, the illustrations, and well...the ending. Loved it. Very short text. Very interesting, complex illustrations with multiple layers.

  • Metin Yılmaz
    2018-10-23 05:09

    Çok mühim işler yaptığımız hayatlarımızda neleri göz ardı ediyoruz, neleri kaçırıyoruz ya da neleri görmek istemiyoruz bunlara cevap niteliğinde bir çizgi hikaye. Shaun Tan'ın hayal gücü ve eşsiz çizgileri ile birlikte güzel bir kitap.

  • Rebecca
    2018-11-11 07:19

    I'm only giving it 4 stars because it wasn't *quite* as magical as The Red Tree. The main character finds a Lost Thing on the beach. It's huge and red and looks kind of like a giant coffee pot with tentacle-y feet. No one wants it; where does it belong? And who is responsible now that it has been Found?This is another engrossing picture book for older readers, with endless details to be appreciated in the collage illustrations, from bits of text ("No office desk is complete without a good spool of 20mm industrial-strength Red Tape. ORDER NOW!!!") to intricate industrial locales. Although the narration is simple, the story will leave you wondering about the value of paying attention to the world, reaching out to what "doesn't quite fit," and how easily those things can fall through the cracks when faced with a federal department whose motto is "sweepus underum carpetae."

  • Maharetr
    2018-11-17 06:06

    I read this straight through in the Oxford Street Bookshop (took less than five minutes), and only did the 'you're not crying in the shop!' thing once, which is good going for a Shaun Tan.Then I went and bought it, and spent a total of an hour pouring over all the hundreds of tiny details on the train. So beautiful, and utterly wrenching. He writes of kids' magic: all the things you see before the grown up world trains you out of seeing what's really there.

  • notgettingenough
    2018-10-24 05:27

    Wherein Shaun Tan ruins my theories about hard cover vs soft....http://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpres...

  • أميرة هاني
    2018-10-22 07:13

    إيه ده! في جمال ورقة كدة يا ربي؟https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CVV7k...Caution: This will make you cry (happy tears).

  • Bronislava Sencakova
    2018-11-20 13:26

    Pekný príbeh o stratených veciach - pekne vyrozprávaný a pekne nakreslený. Potešila ma scrapbookovitosť jednotlivých stránok, aj hlbšie prepojenie textu s grafikou. Škoda, že preklad sa týkal len textu-textu a nie textu v kresbách; anglicky nehovoriacim tak ujde kopec drobných náznakov a hrátok.Prvá veta:Hovoríte, že chcete počuť príbeh...Posledná veta:Lebo mám príliš veľa inej práce alebo čo.Goodreads výzva 2017:122. dočítaná kniha

  • Aslı Can
    2018-11-14 10:09

    Shaun Tan öyle güzel atmosfer yaratıyor ki çizdiği evrenerin var olduğuna inanasım geliyor. Sokaktaki garip varlıkların peşinde gezerken veya bir borunun ucunun nereye çıktığını bulmaya çalışırken kaybolduğumu hayal edebiliyorum.

  • Eduardo Ventura
    2018-10-28 05:06

    PERSONAL RESPONSEI like this book very much because of the magic that it has. I also loved the illustrations that I believe were made by the author (Shaun Tan).PLOTThe Lost Thing is a story about Shaun, a young guy that likes to collect bottle tops. One day Shaun was walking by the beach looking for bottle tops for his bottle tops collection when he saw a strange creature. The creature looked like a mix of a big red boiler with crab claws and tentacles. It seemed like everyone was too busy to pay attention to this creature. He played with it all day and at the end of the day he realized that the creature was lost and out of place. He tried to find its owner and brought the creature to his friend's, Pete's, house. Pete has an opinion for everything, but he explained that it may not actually belong anywhere. It is just lost. Shaun asked for help from a government agency when another strange creature came by him and said, "If you really care about the thing you should follow this sign." The creature gave him a little card with a symbol. Shaun and the lost thing looked for this symbol in the city until they found it and it took them to a door that opened to a magic world of lost things.CHARACTERIZATIONI liked Shaun, our main character. I liked to follow his point of view and way of helping the lost thing. He helped the lost thing until he found a place for it. Some people are too busy to even look at those things that are lost in life but he stopped to help this creature and gave us a magical short story.IMPACTS OF SETTINGThis story is set in the near future of dystopian Melbourne, Australia. The story took place on a beach and a city with "really busy" people. It is a gray world with the only colorful things being the lost things. RECOMMENDATIONI recommend this book to 7 to 10 year old kids of any gender because it is a nice and magical short story. I also would recommend it to people that have an interest in art because its illustrations are just amazing. You can always find a good message in this magical story.

  • Rebecca Collins
    2018-10-31 07:00

    Title and brief summary: The Lost Thing by Shaun Tan, this book is based around the idea of curiosity and how it decreases with age. It explores the ideas industrialisation without directly mentioning it.The implied reader: The reader needs to have some awareness of how the world is changing due to industrialisation and how it could effect the community and daily life. Themes: Creativity, loss, lost, belonging, outside the norm, apathy, imagination, suppression of imagination, distraction, pragmatism, bureaucracy, society, congestion, compression, friendship, ignorance, lifestyle, change.Picture book techniques: The lost thing is big and noticeable which makes us wonder why nobody notices it, writing is on lined paper (anecdote), images defy expectation (for example where Shaun is feeding the object) lack of empty spaces which reflects a sense of congestion and compression, perspective - angles of how we look at the lost can reflect on how people forget that it is there, dull colours reflect industrialisation, use of arrows in insignificant places that appear in every picture that is guiding the protagonist but you don't notice them until they are pointed out, Shaun sees himself as an adult which shows that he wants more powerHow do the pictures and words work together: Humour comes from the images, you can get more from the pictures than the words as a reader, some words reflect personalities of characters which is shown in the pictures, pictures bring words to life, words in the pictures have no apparent meaning as there is no context for them - could reflect the idea that the words are from his dad's textbooks which he doesn't understand. By Beccy, Belle, Bia and Michelle

  • Annabel Hall
    2018-10-31 13:02

    Title and brief summary: The Lost Thing by Shaun Tan, this book is based around the idea of curiosity and how it decreases with age. It explores the ideas industrialisation without directly mentioning it.The implied reader: The reader needs to have some awareness of how the world is changing due to industrialisation and how it could effect the community and daily life. Themes: Creativity, loss, lost, belonging, outside the norm, apathy, imagination, suppression of imagination, distraction, pragmatism, bureaucracy, society, congestion, compression, friendship, ignorance, lifestyle, change.Picture book techniques: The lost thing is big and noticeable which makes us wonder why nobody notices it, writing is on lined paper (anecdote), images defy expectation (for example where Shaun is feeding the object) lack of empty spaces which reflects a sense of congestion and compression, perspective - angles of how we look at the lost can reflect on how people forget that it is there, dull colours reflect industrialisation, use of arrows in insignificant places that appear in every picture that is guiding the protagonist but you don't notice them until they are pointed out, Shaun sees himself as an adult which shows that he wants more powerHow do the pictures and words work together: Humour comes from the images, you can get more from the pictures than the words as a reader, some words reflect personalities of characters which is shown in the pictures, pictures bring words to life, words in the pictures have no apparent meaning as there is no context for them - could reflect the idea that the words are from his dad's textbooks which he doesn't understand. By Beccy, Belle, Bia and Michelle

  • Erin
    2018-10-22 12:02

    Awards: Children's Book Council of Australia Award Nominee for Picture Book of the Year - Honour Book (2001), Aurealis Award for Convenor's Award for Excellence (2000)Grades: 2-8A boy out collecting bottle tops notices something strange and lost looking on the beach. He decides to take it home after deciding that it is a "lost thing." Most people don't even notice it until he points it out. His parents don't want him to keep it, so the following day he goes out to find a place for the lost thing to stay.There are some very strong themes in this story of industrialization and its effect on life, curiosity and how curiosity decreases as one ages, loss, belonging and fitting in. These themes make me feel that this story would be more appropriate for older students. I think younger students would enjoy the story, but they might not understand some of the messages. The illustrations are unique and lend themselves to the setting of the story. The pictures are placed almost like images in a scrapbook, with the background being pages out of a technical manual. This adds to the congestion and industrial feel of the story. I read the story first and then watched the film that was made (found on youtube). I actually got more out of the film than I did out of the book. The pace of the reading was measured, the music lent itself to the seriousness of the predicament of the Lost Thing, and the Australian accent of the reader lent credibility to a) the fact that this is an Australian story and b) the "foreignness" of the story setting.

  • Miss Wilson
    2018-11-02 08:16

    It's strange that something so large can be missed (unseen) by so many people, even the main character's parents when it clearly takes up half the living room! The fact the conversation shifts so quickly and easily suggests that life is too fast paced to enjoy or too full of flashy attention-grabbing objects. It points to the acceptance of routine without stopping to appreciate life itself. I liked the image of the arrow he was following which was juxtaposed against the usual arrows which were straight, larger, more frequent and in the opposite direction. Given time, though, even our main character conformed to a life where you don't celebrate the differences. The Lost Thing represents anything we've 'forgotten' which could be family time, childhood, the ability to question, a pasttime, memories, a minority group...Interestingly, the statues remind me of those once revered communist leaders, now 'leftover' in a park for tourists to visit.It's a nice story about belonging which makes the final image all that more poignant - maybe indicating the final place for us all. For teachers, this resource may be useful: https://www.acmi.net.au/media/428194/...

  • Adri
    2018-11-01 12:09

    he sounds so Singaporean. KUDOS for a Chinese in Oz! Beautifully illustrated, this book is wonderful.A short history from www.shauntan.net:Shaun Tan was born in 1974 and grew up in the northern suburbs of Perth, Western Australia. In school he became known as the “good drawer” which partly compensated for always being the shortest kid in every class. He graduated from the University of WA in 1995 with joint honours in Fine Arts and English Literature, and currently works full time as a freelance artist and author, concentrating mostly on writing and illustrating picture books.Shaun began drawing and painting images for science fiction and horror stories in small-press magazines as a teenager, and has since then he has received numerous awards for his picture books, including the CBCA (Children’s Book Council of Australia) Picture Book of the Year Award for The Rabbits with John Marsden. In 2001 Shaun was named Best Artist at the World Fantasy Awards in Montreal. He has recently worked for Blue Sky Studios and Pixar, providing concept artwork for forthcoming films.

  • Anthony Eaton
    2018-11-12 12:26

    The humor in this book - both written and visual - make it arguably my favourite picture book of all time. The fact that the much of the art (including the cover) playfully references some of my favourite artists doesn't hurt, either.I'm adding to this review to mention that the animated short film of 'The Lost Thing' - many years in the making - has just this year (2011) made the shortlist for the academy awards. And so it should. The story's comments on isolation, community, society and connectedness are, if anything, becoming more relevant with every passing year, and it's wonderful to see this book being embraced by a whole new generation of readers.

  • Jacqueline
    2018-11-17 13:27

    "Some things are like that, he said,they are just plain lost."Свива сърцето и го усмихва едновременно.И разкошни илюстрации.I still think about that lost thing from time to time.Specially when I see something out of the corner of my eye which doesn’t quite fit.You know, something with a weird, sad sort of look.I see that kind of thing less and less these days.Maybe there aren’t many lost things around any more.Or maybe...Or maybe I just stopped noticing.Too busy doing other stuff I guess...

  • Joshua Denton
    2018-11-11 07:10

    I feel this book could really help children with writing description in their own stories. A really nice story about accepting and helping people and their diffferences. kind of like a sweeter version of Armin Greder's The Island.

  • Relyn
    2018-10-23 13:25

    Intriguing story. But, the art really makes the book. I just adore Shaun Tan!

  • Soňa
    2018-11-12 05:18

    Sú veci a veci a niektoré sú aj stratené aby mohli byť nájdené. Čo na pohľad vyzerá byť jednoduché takým nemusí byť. O čom je táto útla ilustrovaná kniha od austrálskeho autora? No, prečítajte si zadnú stranu či záložku...hneď ako sa k nim prelúskate cez strany knihy.Prečo? Lebo jednoduchý opis je zbytočný. Táto kniha prináša jeden príbeh zo života v neznámom meste i svete. Ale príbeh je to ten, čo sa možno už aj vám prihodil, len sa akosi vytratil z blízkej pamäte a čaká na opätovné objavenie.

  • Rabia Butt
    2018-11-05 13:16

    Title and brief summary: The Lost Thing by Shaun Tan, this book is based around the idea of curiosity and how it decreases with age. It explores the ideas industrialisation without directly mentioning it.The implied reader: The reader needs to have some awareness of how the world is changing due to industrialisation and how it could effect the community and daily life. Themes: Creativity, loss, lost, belonging, outside the norm, apathy, imagination, suppression of imagination, distraction, pragmatism, bureaucracy, society, congestion, compression, friendship, ignorance, lifestyle, change.Picture book techniques: The lost thing is big and noticeable which makes us wonder why nobody notices it, writing is on lined paper (anecdote), images defy expectation (for example where Shaun is feeding the object) lack of empty spaces which reflects a sense of congestion and compression, perspective - angles of how we look at the lost can reflect on how people forget that it is there, dull colours reflect industrialisation, use of arrows in insignificant places that appear in every picture that is guiding the protagonist but you don't notice them until they are pointed out, Shaun sees himself as an adult which shows that he wants more powerHow do the pictures and words work together: Humour comes from the images, you can get more from the pictures than the words as a reader, some words reflect personalities of characters which is shown in the pictures, pictures bring words to life, words in the pictures have no apparent meaning as there is no context for them - could reflect the idea that the words are from his dad's textbooks which he doesn't understand. By Beccy, Belle, Bia and Michelle

  • Michelle Gibson
    2018-11-10 07:25

    Title and brief summary:This book is based around the idea of curiosity and how it decreases with age. It explores the ideas industrialisation without directly mentioning it.The implied reader:The reader needs to have some awareness of how the world is changing due to industrialisation and how it could effect the community and daily life. Themes:Creativity, loss, lost, belonging, outside the norm, apathy, imagination, suppression of imagination, distraction, pragmatism, bureaucracy, society, congestion, compression, friendship, ignorance, lifestyle, change.Picture book techniques:The lost thing is big and noticeable which makes us wonder why nobody notices it, writing is on lined paper (anecdote), images defy expectation (for example where Shaun is feeding the object) lack of empty spaces which reflects a sense of congestion and compression, perspective - angles of how we look at the lost can reflect on how people forget that it is there, dull colours reflect industrialisation, use of arrows in insignificant places that appear in every picture that is guiding the protagonist but you don't notice them until they are pointed out, Shaun sees himself as an adult which shows that he wants more powerHow do the pictures and words work together:You can get more from the pictures than the words as a reader, some words reflect personalities of characters which is shown in the pictures, pictures bring words to life, words in the pictures have no apparent meaning as there is no context for them - could reflect the idea that the words are from his dad's textbooks which he doesn't understand. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1YG7...

  • Daithi O'connor
    2018-11-09 06:23

    The lost thing is a picture book. It tells the story of a alien/machine like creature that the writer finds on the beach. The writer doesn't know what it is and where it has come from. He decided to take it home and because he feels that it is lost. He brings it to a lost and found but a man there tells him not to leave it here as this is the place where things are forgotten about. He gives the writer another address and the writer and the lost thing go to this place. The story deals with themes of loneliness and solitude but in a very innocent way. It's the illustrations which turn this book into something extraordinary. They give the words extra weight and gives the reader an amazing foundation on which to imagine the story. I think this book would be best suited for KS2 classes. Although not heavy with words, this book, I feel, Is best suited to cross circular activities such as Art or Science. Pupils could be asked to create other 'lost things' and have to create a background for each creature. It could also be used for some guided reading. Open questions such as "how did the lost thing feel after meeting the writer"? could be asked to assess pupils language comprehension but also to give rise to follow on activities such as the one outlines before or other types of role plays or story boards which incorporates elements from the art curriculum.

  • Nadia Begum
    2018-11-01 05:05

    Initially at first glance the story book was complexed to unfold as far as the illustrations were concerned. After analysing the picture book and reading the background information provided, we drew out key themes that became prominent. One of the themes that became more obvious was industrialism; this was portrayed clearly by the dulled, grey colours representing the lack of imagination. There was also an element of repetition and commonality within the pictures, these showed the habitual structured society in which people become absorbed in. There was also many references to numbers within the pictures signifying that everything needed a right answer and you could not explore beyond this. However when the pictures were analysed more closely you could certainly see the creativity within the illustrations; this links to the idea of finding creativity and imagination within yourself. Tan invites us to look at the world in a different perspective; there are subtle images within the dull worn out city which requires the ‘reader’ to look beyond the surface and to notice things or people that do not necessarily fit in the ‘ordinary’ society. This links directly back to the boy who was the only one who could see ‘The Lost Thing ‘. The theme of imagination and looking beyond the surface could definitely be explored further with children.