Read The Birth Wars by Mary-Rose MacColl Online

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Essential reading for every woman who is or may one day become a motherWomen are told they have pregnancy and birth care choices. But their only real choice is which side to take in the birth wars.Each day battles are waged in hospitals and clinics around Australia: between those who view birth as natural and those who view birth as medical. Both sides care deeply about woEssential reading for every woman who is or may one day become a motherWomen are told they have pregnancy and birth care choices. But their only real choice is which side to take in the birth wars.Each day battles are waged in hospitals and clinics around Australia: between those who view birth as natural and those who view birth as medical. Both sides care deeply about women and babies and, driven by deeply held beliefs, both sides claim they should manage birth fro women. They are the doctors and midwives, or 'mechanics' and 'organics', vying for power in The Birth Wars.Based on extensive interviews, national research and moving personal stories, The Birth Wars exposes the cold reality of what happens to women and families when these two sides clash. Real women speak from the heart in this book - from those empowered by their birth experiences, to the many left traumatised, bereaved or confused.Writer, journalist and mother Mary-Rose MacColl delves into the history of birth in Australia, the high rates of medical intervention, and the prejudices that continue to drive care practices. She show why organics and mechanics must work together to put families' needs at the centre of birth.The Birth Wars will help Australian women to navigate one of the most important events in their lives....

Title : The Birth Wars
Author :
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ISBN : 9780702237225
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 246 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Birth Wars Reviews

  • Charming Language
    2019-03-02 15:38

    The ‘wars’ under the microscope here are the daily battles waged across the spectrum of maternity services between (very broadly) the ‘mechanics’ who support medically-monitored, hospital based births and the ‘organics’ who favour a woman-centred, probably midwife-led, natural birth, ideally in a birth centre or at home. As you read this, you have no doubt already begun choosing a side. It’s the sort of thing hotly contested on parenting web forums and thrown into the spotlight by tragic news stories where one side or the other fails their patients. MacColl takes us on the birthing journey via the stories of midwives, obstetricians, allied health professionals and parents, coming to the conclusion that women and babies are being put at risk by the two opposing sides’ unwillingness to cooperate. The book focuses on the Australian situation, as it follows on from MacColl’s involvement in a major review of maternity services conducted by the Queensland Government, but there are comparisons made to alternative, international models as well.Like any good war correspondent, MacColl has been careful to represent this as a complex, heterogeneous battle; it is far too simplistic to talk in terms of knife-happy medics and hippy homebirthers. And this is not an unqualified criticism of health professionals either who, MacColl acknowledges, face untold systemic challenges and believe in patient wellbeing, whichever side of the birth wars they occupy. Rather, the critique is questioning how maternity care models might integrate these two different belief systems within one hospital system (given that the vast majority of Australian women will give birth in hospital) so that women may have more say in labour and birthing processes. Greater integration (and communication) may also save lives in cases where the beliefs of medical staff impact on how quickly treatment decisions are made, such as how long a woman labours before intervention, for example.Ideologically, as a nation (and we’re not, of course, alone in this) we have decided that birth is a dangerous and risky process which should be monitored, and we’ve implemented laws and best practice standards that respond to this. As a woman progresses through antenatal care in the mainstream system, she is far more likely to hear about the risks (her age? her family history? the baby’s position? the blood tests?) than to be given positive feedback about the bloody amazing job her body is doing. At the same time, as consumers (if you like) within this system, many women demand this type of feedback. We are risk-averse. We like certainty. We may even sue if a birth does not go as well as hoped. We are complicit in the hospital system keeping a watchful eye on our pregnancies. Obstetricians and some hospital-based midwives support this methodology with a focus on perceived safety; whereas others (mostly, but not exclusively, midwives) suggest that pregnancy is a natural biological process – not an illness to be treated – and that, if supported and allowed to progress at an individual pace, a woman can do a good job of monitoring her own body. Obstetricians can quote the figures on why caesareans are safer in many cases, or why VBACs are not, whilst midwives have as many reports under their arms to support the opposite view. MacColl argues that the inability of these two factions to work together is leaving women bewildered and impacting on quality of care.An extended review of this book can be found at http://thischarmingmum.com

  • Cass
    2019-03-11 15:51

    An excellent (and relatively unbiased) explanation of the state of affairs in the birth wars. Takes a look at birth from the perspective of ‘organics’ and ‘mechanics’, the author openly admits that it seems an unbiased birthing book is impossible... but sets out to do her very best. I think her conclusion was spot on, so was the reality that the needed solution is unlikely.

  • Sally
    2019-03-21 07:38

    May be quite some time before this is available state-side, but what a spot-on approach to the muddle that birth has become!*Love* the cover.