Read Paper Darts: The Letters of Virginia Woolf (Illustrated Letters) by Virginia Woolf Frances Spalding Online

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Virginia Woolf often wrote as many as six letters a day. This collection is illustrated with contemporary photographs and paintings - many of them by members of the Bloomsbury Group, such as Woolf's sister Vanessa Bell, Roger Fry and Duncan Grant - and aims to evoke the literary and artistic life of the day. The letters - at times witty and irreverent, at times melancholyVirginia Woolf often wrote as many as six letters a day. This collection is illustrated with contemporary photographs and paintings - many of them by members of the Bloomsbury Group, such as Woolf's sister Vanessa Bell, Roger Fry and Duncan Grant - and aims to evoke the literary and artistic life of the day. The letters - at times witty and irreverent, at times melancholy and introspective - are possibly even more revealing for their insights into the complex personality of the novelist herself. "A true letter", she insisted, "should be like a film of wax pressed close to the graving of the mind". The book contains biographical notes on the main recipients of the letters, together with background information on Virginia Woolf's life and work. Frances Spalding's previous books include "British Art Since 1900" and biographies of the painters Roger Fry and Vanessa Bell....

Title : Paper Darts: The Letters of Virginia Woolf (Illustrated Letters)
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ISBN : 9781855851030
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 160 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Paper Darts: The Letters of Virginia Woolf (Illustrated Letters) Reviews

  • C.
    2019-05-01 02:30

    What a curious, ugly little book this is! It was published in 1992, but it seems to have taken its inspiration from 1970s Australian architecture (hint: mission brown). Every page is encircled by a monumentally ugly border in grey, crowned with a bizarre flourish at the top of the page. Everything is in shades of brown - muted blue or green for the sky and grass, perhaps.I do love Virginia Woolf, but I often wonder if it's more on principle than on my actual reactions to her writing. I do find her very difficult to get in to, and I have to be in the right mood, and it always takes a while. Most of the time when I'm reading her I am conscious of the fact that I am not getting nearly as much out of it as I could.I had the same experience with this selection of letters. A lot of the earlier ones seemed pretty boring, but then it hit the Bloomsbury period and bam! So much brilliance. So I'm not sure if this corresponds to my own attention span or an actual material change in the quality or subject matter of her letter writing.Honestly, I suspect she was a snob. But oh, such beauty! Such talent! If I have time I would like to add some quotes to this review later.