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The relationship between mothers and sons has been explored for ages. From Oedipus to Al Brooks' Mother, we are fascinated by the familial bond between a mother and her son. This groundbreaking work looks at many untouched areas of the mother-son relationship including race, sexuality and ability. The contributors to this collection speak from the heart and explore how theThe relationship between mothers and sons has been explored for ages. From Oedipus to Al Brooks' Mother, we are fascinated by the familial bond between a mother and her son. This groundbreaking work looks at many untouched areas of the mother-son relationship including race, sexuality and ability. The contributors to this collection speak from the heart and explore how the institution of motherhood oppresses women, impedes mother-son identification and fosters sexism. The impact of the feminist movement on the mother-son relationship, which has been previously neglected in literature, is explored in-depth in Mothers and Sons _ . These deeply personal reflections includes stories of lesbian mothers identifying challenges in raising sons in our heterosexist culture as well as black mothers and sons and Jewish mothers. For all with an interest in family issues, gender issues, or a new perspective on mothering, this book is a must read....

Title : Mothers and Sons: Feminist Perspectives
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 6543507
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 283 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Mothers and Sons: Feminist Perspectives Reviews

  • Keith
    2019-01-30 01:08

    26 September I wasn't sure what to expect from this book when I started reading it. Thank goodness it's not a self-help book.It is a series of essays that examines the Mother/Son relationship and explodes the myth of the all-powerful mother as the cause of all the sexist problems associated with boys and men. So far, it is concerned with the dichotomy of a Mother's wish to protect her son(s) and how this is sometimes incompatible with her own needs and wishes. Further, it looks at the cultural issues that impact upon this relationship and how Mothers view their role in the learning process.A fascinating read so far.27 September This book gets better, as it begins to use testimony rather than voice theories about the raising of sons. Much of this so resonated with me I had to pinch myself to make sure it wasn't me these Mother's were referring to. This isn't meant to be conceited - the stories are just so reflective of my upbringing, particularly in regard to an absentee Father.28 September Still dealing with real stories, for the first time the book asks sons what they think about being brought up by a feminist. There is a feeling of fear and concern that these male children may not 'fit in' with their peers, as they have been brought up with a different perspective. In other words, the influence of nurture rather than perceived nature.4 October Unfortunately, the book got a little heavy on the theory and was solely concerned with American culture and the messages it conveys to boys to be strong, independent, silent etc. - all the standard stereotypes.The book is interesting in putting forward the idea of continued connectivity with Mothers as a way of ensuring a more rounded individual, who accepts talking about feelings as be perfectly usual.it's not really a self-help book, but it does have some good pointers as to how to play down the more poisonous aspects of masculinity.Favourite Quote: "Most of these tips were too insignificant for the pediatricly educated to bother with, but they saved countless lives on the front. I remember trying to talk with Joan one afternoon while Ryan fussed in his playpen, flinging his rattles, teething rings, even his beloved pacifier overboard, then wailing loudly until I retrieved each item. Undoubtedly recognizing the homicidal glint in my eye as I got up for the fiftieth time, Joan asked if I had a roll of cellophane tape. I thought maybe she was going to tape his mouth shut—a thought that had begun forming darkly in my own mind—but instead she gently wrapped it, sticky side out, around his fingers on both hands. He became totally absorbed for the next half-hour, testing the tactile surface on his shirt, his nose, his hair, his toes. A toy that cost almost nothing, couldn’t be thrown overboard, made no rattling noises, it was the perfect pacifier. I kept rolls of cellophane everywhere for the next three years—next to the phone, in the glove compartment, in my purse.“Where did you learn this stuff?” I asked Joan, who possessed a wealth of small but effective techniques for preventing child-abuse.“I don’t know,” she said, “I guess after five kids, I now think like one: ‘What would be fun?’” - Mothers and Sons, Andrea O'Reilly

  • Jen
    2019-02-03 01:43

    I was hoping this book would be more . . . personable, I guess. It was very academic, with very formal language. It gives you plenty to think about, if you can wrap your mind around reading the text in the first place.

  • Simone
    2019-02-19 07:09

    Great read, an important book, useful advice, a text that would be good for someone familiar with a lot of postmodern thinkers

  • Cécile
    2019-02-19 05:58

    The chapter by the main author fed my reflexion on how raising sons can help create a more equal society, but I skipped a lot of passages, which was a bit tedious.