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Greek athletics flourished more in the Roman empire than ever before. Jason Konig offers an exciting new cultural history of the athletics of this period, setting out neglected evidence for athletic festivals and athletic education. He also explores the way in which discussion of athletics, a highly controversial subject, could become entangled in wider debates in Greek anGreek athletics flourished more in the Roman empire than ever before. Jason Konig offers an exciting new cultural history of the athletics of this period, setting out neglected evidence for athletic festivals and athletic education. He also explores the way in which discussion of athletics, a highly controversial subject, could become entangled in wider debates in Greek and Roman culture....

Title : Athletics and Literature in the Roman Empire
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ISBN : 9780521070089
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 420 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Athletics and Literature in the Roman Empire Reviews

  • Phil
    2019-02-03 08:41

    Athletics and Literature in the Roman Empire examines the depiction of Greek athletics in the Imperial period. Konig combines a superb understanding of several important texts from Lucian, Dio Chrysosthom, Pausanias Galen and Philostratus with an impressive understanding of the physical and inscriptional evidence about Greek athletics in the early Imperial period. This combination allows Konig to compare and contrast the texts on which he focuses with how athletics worked, at least, according to non-literary sources. It is one of the reasons why this is a must-read book for those who are interested in Konig. Another reason why this book deserves to be read is that Konig represents an important approach to Greek athletics which is gaining ground, thankfully, in the understanding of Greek athletics; one which moves away from the attempts at physical reconstruction of Greek athletics. However useful those attempts have been in the past, Konig tries to deepen our understanding of the rhetorical and historical context of athletics. His studies compare the mulitple perspectives about athletics in an effort to understand its place in Graeco-Roman society. His findings are insightful, not just for athletic history, but for the cultural understanding of Greece and Rome in the principate. This book is written in a clear style, but the nature of the sources, which are not exactly commonly read, makes this, occasionally, a very dense read. It is well worth it, but greater familiarity with the sources examined is helpful.