Read In Your Blood: Football Culture in the Late '80s and Early '90s by Richard Turner Online

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(from the back:)In your blood takes a general look at the lifestyle of the fans on the terraces. It suggests that a distinctive culture has developed among football fans, which is a particularly dynamic element of working class culture.The work is not written by a journalist or a sociologist, but a Stockport County fan frustrated at the stereotyping of all fans as uncultur(from the back:)In your blood takes a general look at the lifestyle of the fans on the terraces. It suggests that a distinctive culture has developed among football fans, which is a particularly dynamic element of working class culture.The work is not written by a journalist or a sociologist, but a Stockport County fan frustrated at the stereotyping of all fans as uncultured and bigoted yobs by the media, police, government, and football authorities. Soccer fans are the largest single contributor to football's income, yet have no say in the running of, what is after all, the People's Game.Most of the proposed solutions to football's "problems" have either failed miserably or have threatened to destroy the game. Fortunately, the 1980s have seen a developing grass roots consciousness with the growth of the Football Supporters Association, the autonomous voice of the fanzines and fans starting to stand up against threats to their clubs' existence.Football is a whole way of life for many people, one that is well worth defending against incompetent management, spiteful government legislation, greedy developers and media hysteria....

Title : In Your Blood: Football Culture in the Late '80s and Early '90s
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ISBN : 9781870736077
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 90 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

In Your Blood: Football Culture in the Late '80s and Early '90s Reviews

  • Michael
    2018-11-19 05:10

    This is an interesting analysis by a fan of soccer ("football") culture in the UK. At the time of printing, British "football hooliganism" was a topic of international press interest, and it continues to be a question of academic study as well. A pro-Labor leftist, Turner gives his view: the majority of football fans are decent working-class folks who have been given a bad reputation by a minority of racist thugs and troublemakers, and have been treated shabbily by the clubs and the press. Most interesting are some of his insights into how football riots have been started or provoked by police over-reaction and deaths have been caused by poorly designed stadiums. He also examines the troubling culture of racist skinheads and their involvement in British football culture, which of course he repudiates. Perhaps more troubling to Turner is the willingness of ordinary fans to join in on racist chants taunting opposing teams' players, which he urges fans to "stand up against."Overall, this slim volume is not a deep analysis of the topic, but it is a useful introduction and helps dispel some of the myths regarding the supposed "ugliness" of British football fans.