Read Dickinson: Poems by Emily Dickinson Online

dickinson-poems

Considered by many to be the spiritual mother of American poetry, Emily Dickinson (1830–1886) was one of the most prolific and innovative poets of her era. Well-known for her reclusive personal life in Amherst, Massachusetts, her distinctively short lines, and eccentric approach to punctuation and capitalization, she completed over seventeen hundred poems in her short lifeConsidered by many to be the spiritual mother of American poetry, Emily Dickinson (1830–1886) was one of the most prolific and innovative poets of her era. Well-known for her reclusive personal life in Amherst, Massachusetts, her distinctively short lines, and eccentric approach to punctuation and capitalization, she completed over seventeen hundred poems in her short life. Though fewer than a dozen of her poems were actually published during her lifetime, she is still one of the most widely read poets in the English language. Over one hundred of her best poems are collected here....

Title : Dickinson: Poems
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ISBN : 9780679429074
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 256 Pages
Status : Available For Download
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Dickinson: Poems Reviews

  • Ahmad Sharabiani
    2019-02-21 12:23

    Emily Dickinson: Poems, Emily Dickinsonشعرهای امیلی دیکنسون؛ تاریخ خوانش: بیست و چهارم سپتامبر سال 2016 میلادیا. شربیانی

  • Cheryl
    2019-03-09 05:25

    Sweet skepticism of the Heart-That knows - and does not know- Sometimes there is only one place to go: within, where the mind and body communicate poetically. Those poets of her time, they stayed securely snuggled into their worlds, while she traversed the unbeaten paths around them, creating abstract spaces made tangible through musicality. They stayed within their conformed art and hers elevated both the physical and mental, while she wrote from a house they deemed her prison, but one that would become this artist's fortress. Shall I take thee, the Poet saidTo the propounded word?"She was aware of external standards but did not strive to adhere to them." They wrote with one accord, while she created her own rules: dashes to replace punctuation, incorrect spelling, melancholia refined through unique language and made beautiful on the page.Shame is the shawl of PinkIn which we wrap the SoulTo keep it from infesting Eyes- The elemental Veil She didn't marry, didn't do many of the things expected of a woman living in her century. In fact it took a while for her art to be seriously recognized. Still, she wrote. She wrote to figure out the pain she lived with. She wrote to conquer her fears. She wrote to bring us introspection through the word. And when she had no friends, when she was betrayed by lovers, she wrote about the solace she found in Nature, the peace she found in the still of the universe. My best Acquaintances are thoseWith Whom I spoke no Word -Over the years, I've read a few of her poems here and there, but this edition, this collection, is my favorite. It is one to have on the shelf and revisit. I stayed with this for some time, savored Dickinson's words, viewed the world through her poet's eyes, as I followed the chronological organization of her poems. The poems are arranged according to years, 1850 and onwards, towards the 1880s, around the time of her death (although the numbering is different which is a bit annoying because Dickinson's poems rely on numbers as titles). 1877 I think is my favorite year, when some of her longer poems occur, at times both scathingly introspective and inclusive of the natural world, confident, opinionated.

  • Rita
    2019-02-28 12:06

    #31They shut me up in Prose-As when a little GirlThey put me in the ClosetBecause they liked me "still"-Still!Could themself have peeped-And seen my Brain-go round-They might as wise have lodged a BirdFor Treason-in the Pound-Himself has but to willAnd easy as a StarAbolish his Captivity-And laugh-No more have I-I tried very hard to appreciate Emily Dickinson, in fact I read this collection of her poetry twice, but most of her poetry left me cold. The vast majority of her poetry was not published until after her death in 1886. Her poems are mainly about flowers and death. She numbered her poems rather than name them. If this review seems clinical it's because I don't sense any real emotion in her poetry. Emily was a recluse but she did have friends that she corresponded with regularly. Some say that she suffered from agoraphobia. She lived a very limited life, in my opinion.I'm afraid that all I could give her was 2.5 stars. I have no desire to read anymore of her poetry. I guess my preference runs towards the more modern.Posted January 27, 2018

  • Teresa Proença
    2019-03-03 09:15

    Como todas as minhas palavras de amor para Dickinson serão ridículas (obrigada Álvaro de Campos), transcrevo as de Bloom — e as Dela."A força da sua poesia é indubitável, como a da Bíblia, de Shakespeare, de Blake e de Whitman. Apenas se irá tornar um desafio cada vez maior à medida que passem os séculos. Como Whitman, ela há-de deter-se algures, à nossa espera."Harold Bloom______________________________"Mostrei-lhe Cumes que ela nunca vira —«Sobes?», disse euEla disse — «Não» —«Comigo» — disse eu — Comigo?Mostrei-lhe Segredos — o Ninho da Manhã —A Corda que as Noites estenderam —E agora — «Convidas-me a ficar?»Ela não soube bem se dizer Sim —E então, eu afrouxei a minha vida — EPara ela, ali brilhou solene, a Luz,Tão mais quanto mais longe a sua face —Como podia ela, ainda, dizer «Não»?"______________________________"A Dor — tem um Elemento de Branco —Não consegue lembrar O seu início — ou se existiuUm tempo em que não foi —Não tem Futuro — só em si —O Sem Fim contém O seu Passado — pronto a discernirNovos Períodos — de Dor."_____________________________"Dizem que o «Tempo acalma» —Nunca o tempo acalmou —A dor real é que se faz mais tensaComo os Tendões, com a idade —O Tempo é uma Prova de Tormento —Mas não o seu Remédio —E se tal coisa prova, também provaQue não houve Doença —"______________________________Cem poemas a ler..."Para sempre — é composto de Agoras —Não é um tempo diferente —Excepto pela Infinidade —E Latitude de Lar —Disto — Aqui experimentado —Tirem-se a Estes — as Datas —Que os Meses se dissolvam noutros Meses —E os Anos — se dissipem noutros Anos —Sem Debate — nem Pausa —Nem Feriado a Cumprir —Não seriam diferentes os Nossos Anos Do Anno Domini —" ...para sempre —

  • Leola
    2019-03-20 09:09

    "I found the words to every thoughtI ever had - but One -And that - defies Me -As a Hand did try to chalk the SunTo Races - nurtured in the Dark -How would your Own - begin?Can Blaze be shown in Cochineal -Or Noon - in Mazarin?"

  • Matt
    2019-02-22 11:07

    I've read a fair bit of her poetry and all I can say is that it astounds me, seduces me, challenges me, enlightens me. I can't lay claim to being any kind of expert but I love her vision, her way of seeing, her developing a highly idiosyncratic personal language that is informed by previous poetic tradition but that resolutely bends the note and pushes it forward. "Making it new" before it was cool, before they even had a name for it. I'm actually kind of hesitant to read more of her because I think I'm not ready yet...her power is exhausting and exhaustive...

  • Evi *
    2019-03-06 11:29

    Era un sabato mattino che succedeva ad una notte quasi insonne e affollata di problemi in forma di mostri invincibili, il mattino, già di per sé, con la sua alba dalle dita rosate, rischiara il nero della notte, ma può molto anche la lettura in punta di giorno di poesia in genere, la poesia ha questo potere benefico e terapeutico. nella fattispecie sono stati i versi di Emily Dickinson, tonico, balsamo che lenisce i dolori, amplifica l’essere, rinfranca il sentirsi vicini a un’anima bella e profonda come quella della poetessa americana. Questa raccolta di poesie di Emily Dickinson, omaggiata anni or sono dal Corriere della Sera, forse non contiene il meglio della sua produzione, non mi è chiaro il criterio con cui le poesie vi sono riunite, non c’è alcun apparato critico (non che sia necessario perché le liriche sono di immediato impatto), né mi permetto di disquisire sulla bontà della traduzione.Lo considero comunque un assaggio della sua sterminata produzione, lei che versificò più di 1700 poesie quasi 80 all’anno, tutte senza titolo, mai pubblicate in vita per una ritrosia che sempre la contraddistinse.Emily è una creatura selvatica, solitaria, ribelle nella sua decisione di non mettere più piede fuori casa e di trascorrere tutta una vita chiusa in una stanza, ribelle nella sua passione di poetessa che non lasciò posto ad alcuna altra attività, insubordinata anche nell’abbigliamento sempre e soltanto di bianco vestita, non viaggiò mai, limitando il suo orizzonte visivo al giardino della residenza di famiglia.Tutto questo non le impedì di far librare la sua fantasia innalzando versi bellissimi oltre lo spicchio di cielo che vedeva al di là delle finestre della sua camera, rincorrendo e cogliendo l’anelito di infinito che provò a di racchiudere dentro la gabbia di brevi poesie, tentò di penetrare l’enigma della morte, cercò di scacciare il cuore di tenebra della disperazione, ma pure, in un multiformismo sorprendente, abbassò i suoi temi cantando l’economia della vita quotidiana e domestica: un ragno che tesse il suo gomitolo d’argento, la vita di un filo d erba che segue il suo ciclo fino a diventare fieno, il volo dell’ape, le stagioni, la natura.Leggere, leggere poesia, costa meno di un antidepressivo, di un ricostituente chimico, meno di un pacchetto di sigarette, molto, molto meno di un’ora da uno psicoanalista, e soprattutto non ha mai, mai controindicazioni né effetti collaterali, forse l’unico quello di provare a farci toccare con un dito l’eternità per poi farci ripiombare con un tonfo sul nudo e duro pavimento della realtà.Se più non fossi vivaQuando verranno i pettirossi,Date a quello con la cravatta rossaPer ricordo una briciola.Se non potessi ringraziarviPerché immersa nel bel sonno,Sappiate che mi sforzoCon le mie labbra di granito.....................Ciò che temevo venne, Ma meno spaventoso, Perché il lungo timore L'aveva quasi abbellito. Ci si abitua all'angoscia, Alla disperazione. Peggio saper che viene Che saperla presente. Chi indossa la sua pena Il mattino che è nuova Soffre più che a portarla Un'intera esistenza...........L’incertezza è più ostile della morte.la morte, anche se vasta,è soltanto la morte e non può crescere.all’incertezza invece non v’è limite,perisce per risorgeree morire di nuovo,è l’unione del Nullacon l’Immortalità

  • Lou KR
    2019-03-18 08:24

    Admirada por la poesía de esta mujer.

  • Baylee
    2019-03-06 07:59

    Puoi trovare questa recensione anche sul mio blog ---> La siepe di moreMa secondo voi è normale che io, nonostante sia consapevole che Emily Dickinson sia una delle maggiori poetesse statunitensi, continui a immaginarla nella campagna inglese? Ogni volta che leggevo una delle sue poesie “naturaliste”, la mia mente partoriva pensieri come “che bella descrizione della campagna inglese”. Questo tanto per darvi un'idea dello stato brado della mia mente e del perché vi chiami “prodi seguaci”...Comunque, parliamo di Emily Dickinson, poetessa americana. Inizierei col dire che la Dickinson era una donna ribelle: cominciò con il rifiutarsi di professarsi pubblicamente cristiana e finì per isolarsi volontariamente nella sua stanza, in modo che i suoi pensieri e le sue poesie fluissero copiose e libere dalla sua mente.Nonostante il suo isolamento, infatti, la Dickinson avvertiva chiaramente le tensioni del suo tempo: l'abisso che si faceva spazio tra la tradizione e il nuovo individualismo, tra il puritanesimo e il capitalismo. In pochi colsero la portata innovativa delle sue poesie: Thomas Wentworth Higginson, critico dell'Atlantic Monthly con il quale Emily Dickinson instaurò una lunga corrispondenza, definì i suoi versi “spasmodici”. Va anche detto, però, che il poveretto è passato alla storia per non aver capito un tubo della poetessa.Lei stessa ne era consapevole (e probabilmente l'ha pure, elegantemente e poeticamente, sfottuto un po' per questo), ma si rifiutò di “sistemare” le sue poesie affinché Higginson – e coloro che la pensavano come lui – le trovassero di loro gradimento. A favore del poveruomo va detto, però, che grazie a lui ci sono giunte molte informazioni sulla Dickinson e queste ci hanno aiutato ad avere un'idea più chiara di lei.Personalmente, sono rimasta folgorata dalla potenza della gioia di vivere e parimenti dall'abisso di dolore che sprigionano i componimenti della Dickinson. Se la sua vita sembrava insostenibilmente monotona, la sua interiorità era fervida e ricca, tanto che la vita della Dickinson si racconta più in termini di riflessioni che in termini di fatti strettamente biografici.Il mio consiglio è di leggere le sue poesie, almeno una volta nella vita. Nella brevità dei suoi versi è racchiusa una potenza che, secondo me, va provata.

  • Jamieanna
    2019-02-18 12:18

    This was my second time reading this edition of the poems all the way through. This time I could see trends in the poems more clearly, as well as stark differences in quality and mood across Dickinson’s lifetime. Different poems jumped out at me than before, and I’m sure there are still others hidden for me to discover in the future.

  • Damiana
    2019-02-27 05:05

    4-/5

  • Dr. Carl Ludwig Dorsch
    2019-03-09 10:24

    [Received April 26, 1862:]MR. HIGGINSON,--Your kindness claimed earlier gratitude, but I was ill, and write to-day from my pillow. Thank you for the surgery; it was not so painful as I supposed. I bring you others, as you ask, though they might not differ. While my thought is undressed, I can make the distinction; but when I put them in the gown, they look alike and numb. You asked how old I was? I made no verse, but one or two, until this winter, sir. I had a terror since September, I could tell to none; and so I sing, as the boy does by the burying ground, because I am afraid. You inquire my books. For poets, I have Keats, and Mr. and Mrs. Browning. For prose, Mr. Ruskin, Sir Thomas Browne, and the Revelations. I went to school, but in your manner of the phrase had no education. When a little girl, I had a friend who taught me Immortality; but venturing too near, himself, he never returned. Soon after my tutor died, and for several years my lexicon was my only companion. Then I found one more, but he was not contented I be his scholar, so he left the land. You ask of my companions. Hills, sir, and the sundown, and a dog large as myself, that my father bought me. They are better than beings because they know, but do not tell; and the noise in the pool at noon excels my piano. I have a brother and sister; my mother does not care for thought, and father, too busy with his briefs to notice what we do. He buys me many books, but begs me not to read them, because he fears they joggle the mind. They are religious, except me, and address an eclipse, every morning, whom they call their "Father." But I fear my story fatigues you. I would like to learn. Could you tell me how to grow, or is it unconveyed, like melody or witchcraft? You speak of Mr. Whitman. I never read his book, but was told that it was disgraceful. I read Miss Prescott's Circumstance, but it followed me in the dark, so I avoided her. Two editors of journals came to my father's house this winter, and asked me for my mind, and when I asked them "why" they said I was penurious, and they would use it for the world. I could not weigh myself, myself. My size felt small to me. I read your chapters in the Atlantic, and experienced honor for you. I was sure you would not reject a confiding question. Is this, sir, what you asked me to tell you? Your friend, E. DICKINSON.

  • Erika B. (SOS BOOKS)
    2019-03-11 06:25

    I was lucky enough to study dear Emily for an entire semester of school. She is often remembered as a recluse but I like to think of her as secretly passionate and brilliant! If you like to solve riddles than the poems of Emily Dickinson are for you! In this edition you can read the poems in their original format. I mean would someone who is completely shut off from the world write-Wild nights - Wild nights!Were I with theeWild nights should beOur luxury!Futile - the winds -To a Heart in port -Done with the Compass -Done with the Chart!Rowing in Eden -Ah - the Sea!Might I but moor - tonight -In thee!Love her!

  • J Marie
    2019-03-12 07:27

    It is a truth universally acknowledged that I hate poetry. I really, truly hate it. Or I did, until I came across one of Emily Dickinson's poems, and subsequently devoured an entire collection of them. Emily Dickinson writes with magic- her poems are lyrical and emotional without the melodrama I'd come to associate with most poetry. They're absolutely beautiful in their simplicity.

  • Irene Carmina
    2019-03-04 11:21

    Emily, quanta ardente passione, di quanto amore eri capace. Hai dato voce alle mie emozioni, rendendole parola senza sbiadire la voce dell'anima. La tua poesia è rugiada; purissima, candida, ingenua. Dolce Emily, mi hai commosso.

  • James
    2019-03-04 05:08

    Elysium is as far as toThe very nearest room,If in that room a friend awaitFelicity or doom.What fortitude the soul contains,That it can so endureThe accent of a coming foot,The opening of a door!

  • EL Core
    2019-03-18 08:20

    I have been reading and enjoying Emily Dickinson’s poetry for three decades. Because goodreads has mashed together the reviews of all the editions of Dickinson’s poetry, this is a joint review of the three modern collected editions of her poems; that is, I review here Thomas H. Johnson’s 1960 The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson (ISBN 0-316-18414-4 and 978-0-316-18414-4; 1976 paperback 0-316-18413-6 and 978-0-316-18413-7); R. W. Franklin’s 1999 The Poems of Emily Dickinson: Reading Edition (ISBN 0-674-67624-6 and 978-0-674-67624-4; 2005 paperback 0-674-01824-9 and 978-0-674-01824-2); and, Cristanne Miller’s Emily Dickinson’s Poems: As She Preserved Them (ISBN 0-674-73796-2 and 978-0-674-73796-9).I have read the Johnson and Miller editions straight through, Johnson in 2002 and Miller in 2016.The chief difference between Franklin’s edition and Johnson’s is the order of the poems: Franklin concluded that Johnson had dated many of the poems wrongly. Since each edition presents the poems in roughly chronological order, according to the editor’s best judgement, the order of poems in Franklin’s book differs markedly from that of Johnson’s. Also, Franklin reproduces Emily’s peculiar spelling, which Johnson regularized; and, where Emily left a poem in an unpolished state, Franklin occasionally presents a slightly different text than Johnson did — deciding to use one word rather than another, for instance.Miller’s edition differs even more dramatically in the order of the poems: Miller generally accepts Franklin’s dating of the poems, but she presents them in five sections based on how Emily “preserved them”. The first section presents the poems that Emily herself had assembled into little booklets called fascicles; the second section presents poems that Emily herself had saved on “unbound sheets” joined together with a brass fastener (though we don’t know whether Emily herself did the fastening); the third section presents “loose poems” that Emily had kept in her possession; the fourth section presents “poems transcribed by others” for which no manuscript in Emily’s hand has been found; finally, the fifth and last section presents "poems not retained" by the poet herself but given to others. The first three sections are by far the longest, and a majority of the poems appear in the first two sections.One wouldn’t go wrong using any of these three complete editions — Johnson, Franklin, or Miller. I think Miller’s is best, though, in three respects. First, simply because most of the poems are presented by Miller in fairly small groups (sheets, leaves) whereas the only division of poems in Johnson’s and Franklin’s books are by year, which makes for a run-on effect after reading for a while. Second, Miller also presents variant readings — alternative lines and words written by the poet herself on the manuscript pages. (Thus, we get the most significant aspects of a “variorum” edition in a reader’s edition.) Third, Miller footnotes to whom (if anyone) the poet shared each poem, and she provides some helpful annotation about possible sources, references, and allusions, in endnotes.Miller’s edition is a large and heavy book, though, which is its main drawback; also, as I write (November 2017), Johnson’s and Franklin’s editions are available as paperbacks, but Miller’s is not.Franklin provides no cross-reference to the Johnson edition — an inexcusable omission, I think. Miller’s index of first lines provides the Johnson and Franklin numbers for cross-referencing; alas, though, she provides no numbering system for the poems in her own edition, a deliberate choice that I think was imprudent. I myself have resorted to referring to the poems in Miller’s edition by page and poem number. For instance, one of my favorites, “The Life we have is very great”, is Johnson # 1162, Franklin # 1178, and Miller “number” 707.3.Johnson’s edition has one advantage over the others: it has a subject index at the back of the book, “a classification based principally on key words in the poems themselves” (p. 723). Johnson’s might also be considered the classic or standard work, since it stood alone among scholarly editions for four decades.Johnson’s edition presents 1,775 poems; Franklin’s edition presents 1,789 poems, since he and Johnson disagreed about whether a handful of writings are a single poem or different poems; and, Miller’s edition presents 1,785 poems, I think, because in the Introduction she mentions three in Franklin’s edition that she does not include for various reasons.By the way, if you are reading a book of poems by Emily Dickinson that is not edited by, nor can be traced ultimately to the work of, Thomas H. Johnson, R. W. Franklin, and/or Cristanne Miller, you are not actually reading Emily Dickinson’s poems, but some other person’s heavy-handed editing of her poems. Such other persons include Mabel Loomis Todd, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Millicent Todd Bingham, Martha Dickinson Bianchi, and Alfred Leete Hampson. (That would be any book originally published before the 1950s.)As I mentioned above, I have read straight through two of these editions. Here follow three lists of my 180 favorite Emily Dickinson poems (thus, about 1 in 10 of her poems) as presented in each edition.1960/1976 Johnson (poem number)67 108 125 165 173 174 178 193 208 241 254 258 280 288 294 303 318 335 341 342 345 347 359 365 371 377 380 384 386 387 389 404 405 419 429 432 435 439 441 445 449 453 465 470 478 501 505 507 510 511 516 521 533 536 540 556 561 563 564 568 569 571 573 585 596 599 605 608 613 622 623 632 642 650 656 657 661 662 668 680 686 692 697 698 701 724 725 739 749 757 760 769 771 772 780 781 789 790 791 792 793 795 809 812 813 824b 826 828 833 844 861 863 917 919 946 951 952 959 964 970 974 986 988 1013 1021 1045 1052 1053 1073 1078 1116 1126 1134 1142 1162 1163 1168 1176 1205 1207 1212 1242 1244 1251 1263 1275 1333 1339 1346 1351 1354 1355 1368 1380 1381 1383 1386 1395 1404 1420 1422 1438 1444 1448 1455 1462 1465 1472 1473 1523 1536 1540 1568 1574 1654 1704 1732 1755 1763 17651999/2005 Franklin (poem number)109 112 156 171 172 175 181 187 200 204 215 260 273 278 298 314 320 339 340 344 345 348 351 355 356 372 373 374 383 387 390 401 409 428 445 448 452 465 466 483 497 501 513 515 518 519 525 528 531 533 534 535 538 541 547 550 563 569 571 573 588 591 598 605 620 626 632 639 642 649 654 657 660 667 671 674 677 679 688 689 709 715 721 724 726 727 729 731 737 740 741 747 748 749 753 760 763 768 789 796 797 800 812 825 836 847 861 870 871 882 884 901 905 906 911 913 935 948 951 962 980 982 1023 1032 1056 1057 1072 1081 1086 1090 1096 1108 1115 1138 1152 1178 1192 1197 1223 1243 1259 1266 1286 1300 1329 1341 1343 1351 1356 1359 1373 1381 1383 1384 1389 1392 1405 1413 1420 1422 1450 1457 1464 1480 1481 1484 1491 1495 1506 1523 1546 1560 1597 1605 1687 1745 1747 1773 1779 17882016 Miller (page.poem)69.3 77.3 92.1 94.1 98.2 99.1 102.1 109.1 118.2 119.4 128.1 139.4 150.1 153.1 171.1 179.1 179.2 181.2 182.1 184.1 185.2 187.2 188.1 198.1 198.2 199.1 204.1 206.2 208.2 214.1 218.2 223.3 225.1 226.3 233.1 233.2 240.3 247.2 251.1 252.1 253.2 254.1 259.1 261.2 268.2 270.1 273.2 276.1 279.1 280.3 286.2 289.1 290.2 291.2 292.2 293.1 293.2 294.3 295.3 304.3 307.2 310.2 312.2 313.3 316.1 318.1 320.1 322.3 324.1 327.1 333.2 334.1 345.2 352.1 354.1 357.2 359.1 361.2 362.2 364.1 364.2 365.1 366.2 369.2 371.2 372.1 375.1 375.2 376.1 376.3 378.1 387.1 389.2 395.1 397.1 397.2 400.3 401.2 407.2 412.1 418.1 419.1 420.1 426.2 427.2 427.4 428.1 429.3 430.2 437.3 442.2 443.1 446.1 452.2 452.4 465.2 467.2 474.1 474.2 481.2 484.2 485.3 487.1 488.3 489.3 494.3 497.3 500.1 507.1 518.2 519.2 522.1 522.3 523.1 531.3 532.1 533.3 540.1 544.3 555.3 557.3 562.1 564.3 569.1 580.1 583.4 584.1 586.2 587.2 591.3 595.1 597.2 599.1 599.3 607.1 609.2 610.1 611.4 615.3 616.2 618.3 621.1 624.3 630.3 633.5 642.1 662.3 679.3 686.2 688.1 690.3 702.3 707.3 708.1 711.1 715.3 719.4 720.3 728.1 736.2ELC 11/29/2017

  • EL Core
    2019-03-17 12:04

    I have been reading and enjoying Emily Dickinson’s poetry for three decades. Because goodreads has mashed together the reviews of all the editions of Dickinson’s poetry, this is a joint review of the three modern collected editions of her poems; that is, I review here Thomas H. Johnson’s 1960 The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson (ISBN 0-316-18414-4 and 978-0-316-18414-4; 1976 paperback 0-316-18413-6 and 978-0-316-18413-7); R. W. Franklin’s 1999 The Poems of Emily Dickinson: Reading Edition (ISBN 0-674-67624-6 and 978-0-674-67624-4; 2005 paperback 0-674-01824-9 and 978-0-674-01824-2); and, Cristanne Miller’s Emily Dickinson’s Poems: As She Preserved Them (ISBN 0-674-73796-2 and 978-0-674-73796-9).I have read the Johnson and Miller editions straight through, Johnson in 2002 and Miller in 2016.The chief difference between Franklin’s edition and Johnson’s is the order of the poems: Franklin concluded that Johnson had dated many of the poems wrongly. Since each edition presents the poems in roughly chronological order, according to the editor’s best judgement, the order of poems in Franklin’s book differs markedly from that of Johnson’s. Also, Franklin reproduces Emily’s peculiar spelling, which Johnson regularized; and, where Emily left a poem in an unpolished state, Franklin occasionally presents a slightly different text than Johnson did — deciding to use one word rather than another, for instance.Miller’s edition differs even more dramatically in the order of the poems: Miller generally accepts Franklin’s dating of the poems, but she presents them in five sections based on how Emily “preserved them”. The first section presents the poems that Emily herself had assembled into little booklets called fascicles; the second section presents poems that Emily herself had saved on “unbound sheets” joined together with a brass fastener (though we don’t know whether Emily herself did the fastening); the third section presents “loose poems” that Emily had kept in her possession; the fourth section presents “poems transcribed by others” for which no manuscript in Emily’s hand has been found; finally, the fifth and last section presents "poems not retained" by the poet herself but given to others. The first three sections are by far the longest, and a majority of the poems appear in the first two sections.One wouldn’t go wrong using any of these three complete editions — Johnson, Franklin, or Miller. I think Miller’s is best, though, in three respects. First, simply because most of the poems are presented by Miller in fairly small groups (sheets, leaves) whereas the only division of poems in Johnson’s and Franklin’s books are by year, which makes for a run-on effect after reading for a while. Second, Miller also presents variant readings — alternative lines and words written by the poet herself on the manuscript pages. (Thus, we get the most significant aspects of a “variorum” edition in a reader’s edition.) Third, Miller footnotes to whom (if anyone) the poet shared each poem, and she provides some helpful annotation about possible sources, references, and allusions, in endnotes.Miller’s edition is a large and heavy book, though, which is its main drawback; also, as I write (November 2017), Johnson’s and Franklin’s editions are available as paperbacks, but Miller’s is not.Franklin provides no cross-reference to the Johnson edition — an inexcusable omission, I think. Miller’s index of first lines provides the Johnson and Franklin numbers for cross-referencing; alas, though, she provides no numbering system for the poems in her own edition, a deliberate choice that I think was imprudent. I myself have resorted to referring to the poems in Miller’s edition by page and poem number. For instance, one of my favorites, “The Life we have is very great”, is Johnson # 1162, Franklin # 1178, and Miller “number” 707.3.Johnson’s edition has one advantage over the others: it has a subject index at the back of the book, “a classification based principally on key words in the poems themselves” (p. 723). Johnson’s might also be considered the classic or standard work, since it stood alone among scholarly editions for four decades.Johnson’s edition presents 1,775 poems; Franklin’s edition presents 1,789 poems, since he and Johnson disagreed about whether a handful of writings are a single poem or different poems; and, Miller’s edition presents 1,785 poems, I think, because in the Introduction she mentions three in Franklin’s edition that she does not include for various reasons.By the way, if you are reading a book of poems by Emily Dickinson that is not edited by, nor can be traced ultimately to the work of, Thomas H. Johnson, R. W. Franklin, and/or Cristanne Miller, you are not actually reading Emily Dickinson’s poems, but some other person’s heavy-handed editing of her poems. Such other persons include Mabel Loomis Todd, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Millicent Todd Bingham, Martha Dickinson Bianchi, and Alfred Leete Hampson. (That would be any book originally published before the 1950s.)As I mentioned above, I have read straight through two of these editions. Here follow three lists of my 180 favorite Emily Dickinson poems (thus, about 1 in 10 of her poems) as presented in each edition.1960/1976 Johnson (poem number)67 108 125 165 173 174 178 193 208 241 254 258 280 288 294 303 318 335 341 342 345 347 359 365 371 377 380 384 386 387 389 404 405 419 429 432 435 439 441 445 449 453 465 470 478 501 505 507 510 511 516 521 533 536 540 556 561 563 564 568 569 571 573 585 596 599 605 608 613 622 623 632 642 650 656 657 661 662 668 680 686 692 697 698 701 724 725 739 749 757 760 769 771 772 780 781 789 790 791 792 793 795 809 812 813 824b 826 828 833 844 861 863 917 919 946 951 952 959 964 970 974 986 988 1013 1021 1045 1052 1053 1073 1078 1116 1126 1134 1142 1162 1163 1168 1176 1205 1207 1212 1242 1244 1251 1263 1275 1333 1339 1346 1351 1354 1355 1368 1380 1381 1383 1386 1395 1404 1420 1422 1438 1444 1448 1455 1462 1465 1472 1473 1523 1536 1540 1568 1574 1654 1704 1732 1755 1763 17651999/2005 Franklin (poem number)109 112 156 171 172 175 181 187 200 204 215 260 273 278 298 314 320 339 340 344 345 348 351 355 356 372 373 374 383 387 390 401 409 428 445 448 452 465 466 483 497 501 513 515 518 519 525 528 531 533 534 535 538 541 547 550 563 569 571 573 588 591 598 605 620 626 632 639 642 649 654 657 660 667 671 674 677 679 688 689 709 715 721 724 726 727 729 731 737 740 741 747 748 749 753 760 763 768 789 796 797 800 812 825 836 847 861 870 871 882 884 901 905 906 911 913 935 948 951 962 980 982 1023 1032 1056 1057 1072 1081 1086 1090 1096 1108 1115 1138 1152 1178 1192 1197 1223 1243 1259 1266 1286 1300 1329 1341 1343 1351 1356 1359 1373 1381 1383 1384 1389 1392 1405 1413 1420 1422 1450 1457 1464 1480 1481 1484 1491 1495 1506 1523 1546 1560 1597 1605 1687 1745 1747 1773 1779 17882016 Miller (page.poem)69.3 77.3 92.1 94.1 98.2 99.1 102.1 109.1 118.2 119.4 128.1 139.4 150.1 153.1 171.1 179.1 179.2 181.2 182.1 184.1 185.2 187.2 188.1 198.1 198.2 199.1 204.1 206.2 208.2 214.1 218.2 223.3 225.1 226.3 233.1 233.2 240.3 247.2 251.1 252.1 253.2 254.1 259.1 261.2 268.2 270.1 273.2 276.1 279.1 280.3 286.2 289.1 290.2 291.2 292.2 293.1 293.2 294.3 295.3 304.3 307.2 310.2 312.2 313.3 316.1 318.1 320.1 322.3 324.1 327.1 333.2 334.1 345.2 352.1 354.1 357.2 359.1 361.2 362.2 364.1 364.2 365.1 366.2 369.2 371.2 372.1 375.1 375.2 376.1 376.3 378.1 387.1 389.2 395.1 397.1 397.2 400.3 401.2 407.2 412.1 418.1 419.1 420.1 426.2 427.2 427.4 428.1 429.3 430.2 437.3 442.2 443.1 446.1 452.2 452.4 465.2 467.2 474.1 474.2 481.2 484.2 485.3 487.1 488.3 489.3 494.3 497.3 500.1 507.1 518.2 519.2 522.1 522.3 523.1 531.3 532.1 533.3 540.1 544.3 555.3 557.3 562.1 564.3 569.1 580.1 583.4 584.1 586.2 587.2 591.3 595.1 597.2 599.1 599.3 607.1 609.2 610.1 611.4 615.3 616.2 618.3 621.1 624.3 630.3 633.5 642.1 662.3 679.3 686.2 688.1 690.3 702.3 707.3 708.1 711.1 715.3 719.4 720.3 728.1 736.2ELC 11/29/2017

  • Ryan
    2019-03-06 05:26

    For the last several months, I have been working through The Poems of Emily Dickinson: Reading Edition, and having finished it I can say it is one of the best books of poetry I have ever read. Dickinson is a fascinating poet, and I know of no better compilation of her poems better than this one.When she died in 1886, Dickinson left behind nearly 1800 individual poems, 99% of which had never seen the light of day outside correspondance. She led an extremely private life, well known in her time only as gardener, and mostly communicating in voluminous letters with people outside her family. While some poems she sent in letters or attached to flowers, she published less than a dozen in her life. The rest she meticulously wrote and rewrote, composing them into several hand written collections that she then stored. This collection presents one version of every poem she wrote, in the chronological order deemed to be correct by studying the poems posthumously.In general her poems are breath taking and energetic, touching themes of life, mortality, beauty and religion. She produced nearly two-thirds of her poems in the short span of 1861 to 1865, her most prolific period coinciding with the Civil War. These poems are even more urgent than the rest, composed in no more than 4 feet per line and with very little enjambment. She also makes liberal use of a dash, sometimes as a caesura but more often as a conjunction, giving her poetry a uniqueness from other poets of the century. Behind her concise form lie many layers of meaning, and I consider at least one forth of the poems to be among the best I have read.To speak for the editing of the book itself, it is perhaps the best I have seen in any collection of poetry. Cutting Dickinson's work down to a single reading for each poem is no light task; many of the 1789 poems presented have multiple versions to choose from, and the book presents the latest of all such versions. Punctuation is another issue, and all of the poems are hand written. The book makes the compromise of capitalizing any not-capitalized lines, and even attempts to match the size of the dash to how it appears in Emily's handwritten. There are no footnotes, and the poems are presented continuously next to only line numbers. The only extra information is perhaps my favorite editorial point: a tiny square at the bottom of a page coinciding with a stanza break in a poem, so that it is always clear where a poems stanzas lie between pages. Much information about the specifics of each poems editorial choices is in the back, but this information hardly matters. This is meant as a Reading edition, and it achieves that purpose flawlessly.Emily Dickinson is the first poet of whose work I have now read completely. I cherish the insight gained in this experience and look forward to finishing the life's work of other poets, but however good they are it would be hard to match the perfection of this book.

  • Andrea
    2019-03-16 11:18

    It took me years to ingest these poems... mostly saved them for bathtime reading. Emily Dickinson's life is shrouded in mystery, and her poems are a small window into her period of time, quiet musings about social and political practices and institutions of the time. In her poems, she expresses a great prediction for change; the world going on and unfolding with new ideas. She also seems to rail against the expectations of her own time, and turns to the natural and spiritual world for eternal comfort, connection and stability.I thought to include, and humbly analyze a well-known poem of Dickinson's, which almost resonates with me:HopeHope is the thing with feathersthat perches in the soul,And sings the tune without the words,and never stops at all,And sweetest in the gale is heard;And sore must be the stormThat could absorb the little birdThat kept so many warm.I've heard it in the chillest land,And on the strangest sea;Yet, never, in extremity,It asked a crumb of me.In the poem, the poet is personifying hope by turning it into a grounded bird within us -- something that hasn't yet tested its wings. Still, the bird sings, ever faithful, unrelenting to its caged existence. It knows how to free itself, to look beyond the danger and hostility -- the unknown. Hope asks for nothing and needs no promise. It simply knows and believes, beyond any and all circumstances, in the truth, regardless.

  • Em
    2019-02-20 10:05

    EMILY DICKINSON(10/12/1830 - 15/05/1886)Emily Elizabeth Dickinson can best be described as a prolific poet who in later life prefered the solitude of being indoors and interacted mainly through letters to her friends. I read that in her life she had written over1800 poems but only a selected few were published while she was still alive, the remainder after her death.She was inspired throughout her life by other writers and I am in love with her poetry.In this small pocket version of selected poetry by Emily Dickinson it makes for a great read as the poems are organised into 3 thematic sections:. . . THE POETS ART. . . THE WORKS OF LOVE. . . DEATH AND RESURRECTIONI love how it is organised!!My favourite poem by Emily is called: Love is inferior to life -LOVE IS INFERIOR TO LIFEPOSTERIOR TO DEATHINITIAL OF CREATIONAND THE EXPONENT OF BREATH.Which is from: The Complete Poems (1924)Her poetry makes for a wonderful read, I particularily love her poems of romanticism because i'm a hopeless romantic and her poetry to me is as fine as that of Emily Bronte, they write with passion and emotion. Many of their greatest poems were never intended to be published, they were simply written by desire. . . That is just my opinion of course.I have given this book five stars because it is one of my favourite collections of poetry.Happy Reading!EmmaxXx

  • Bruce
    2019-03-10 09:16

    Life is death we’re lengthy at,Death the hinge of life.This is the entire text of poem #502 in this edition, an edition gleaned from the editor’s three volume 2,500 sources variorum set of 1998. Dickinson’s poems are characteristically pithy and short, with idiosyncratic punctuation and grammar. Few were published in her lifetime. And due to the editorial changes made in them, she was very unhappy in those that were. American literature owes a great debt to her younger sister who, contrary to Emily’s instructions, chose to begin publishing them instead of destroying them after her death in 1886. The first full edition wasn’t published until 1960. The twentieth century was far more receptive to the poet’s sudden twists of grammar and thought than her own. As a result her fame and following have grown. Resistant to the otherworldly evangelism of her family and friends, Dickinson staked all her hopes in the mundane. The poems are full of the delights of this world, sunrise, sunset, trees, birds, seasonal changes, insects, flowers, stars, and most of all in human love and friendship.

  • Daniel Taylor
    2019-02-23 09:11

    Aware that I don't read enough poetry, this collection of every one of Emily Dickinson's 1789 poems stood out on the library bookshelf.It presents the poem in chronological order, with a section at the end for undated poems. Two connected themes recur in the poems, death and Christianity.To judge this book accurately, it needs to be considered on two fronts. For starters, the aim of editor RW Franklin in putting together a "complete" collection of Dickinson's poems. On this front, the volume is a success.Then a reader needs to turn her attention to the poems themselves. My doctor made the comment that all her poems have an obsession with death. I agreed, but said, "Her writing is like wind chimes in a funeral home."Dickinson use the same metre in every poem and they become hypnotic after a while.While I may not have read much poetry before, I've now moved into the minority that has read every one of Dickinson's poems.

  • Stephanie Jane (Literary Flits)
    2019-03-14 12:03

    I rarely read poetry and picked up this slim volume more in desperation to have something to swap in the campsite library. The Englush book selection is very limited - trashy thrillers or Mills & Boon - so, seeing Dickinson on the Spanish shelves, I thought I might translate a few poems. As luck would have it, this edition is bilingual leaving me only to translate the introduction and Manent is not too pretentious!I've often seen references to Emily Dickinson, especially in American literature, but she wasn't on my school curriculum so I don't think I've read a complete poem of hers before. The collection is a mixed bag of deep and startlingly concise observations, or somewhat twee writings about flowers and bees. She does seem to have a thing for bees, but at least that's reinforced the Spanish word in my memory! I can't say how representative this collection is of Dickinson's whole output, but based solely on it, I can understand why she is so popular still.

  • Dergrossest
    2019-03-02 11:15

    Every once in a while you read a writer who makes you realize how pedestrian your own writing is, as well as virtually everyone else’s. Emily Dickinson is such a writer. Unmarried, untraveled and writing before 1887, she nevertheless wrote in a modern, worldly and powerful style at which I can only marvel. The meaning of life, death and eternity seem much clearer in her slender hands.Even though I previously read some of her work as a child, I can only fully appreciate her now that I have the context which life’s experiences bring. Accordingly, if you have read her before, but not in the recent past, by all means revisit her work. If you have never read her before, run, don’t walk, to read a master.

  • Nick Traynor
    2019-03-08 12:27

    I did struggle with maintaining interest for the first half of this volume. It repeated the themes of birds, bees, butterflies and brooks over and over, and seemed intent on only observing nature while offering half-hearted moral exhortations. The last part redeemed the collection somewhat. It changed its theme to a reflection on death and emptiness, using more emotive and evocative language that was much more pleasing. Overall, Dickinson's style of very short lines, with irregular concern for rhyming left me wanting more volubility, more candidness, more sentiment. Towards the end the prosody began to gather steam and the slant rhyming became a feature rather than the drawback it was earlier, and this left a far more favourable impression.

  • Ayesha Fayyaz
    2019-02-27 07:22

    In early days of nanowripo (Ah! I don't think I have spelled it correctly), one day was dedicated to Emily Dickenson's poetry style and I was very impressed to read her one of the famous poems: Hope is the thing with feathers. Now having read pretty much of them, I think she has an amazing art to describe a simple noun like 'patience, hope, smile, pain' in a variety of wonderful ways. The way she describes 'expanded time and smile's exertion' is mind blowing. Anyone who love poetry must try reading her work once. Some of the poems were very lame and over sentimental and depicted over frustration! Of course I didn't like those.

  • Mary Rose
    2019-03-11 13:01

    En realidad su verdadero puntaje es 4,5 Para ser el primer libro de poemas que leo (ENTERO), me ha gustado bastante, sobretodo si en cada uno de los poemas de Dickinson traten de un tema diferente y que este fuera de lo acostumbrado (aunque bueno, esto se los dice una lectora que hasta ahora ha leido algunos poemas que siempre están centrado en el amor o desamor). Solo podría recomendarles leer este libro si están interesados en leer un poco de poesía y, especialmente, de la mano de Emily Dickinson.

  • Courtney Stoker
    2019-03-05 10:59

    This is such a good edition of Emily Dickinson. I would recommend it over any others I've read.Emily Dickinson is addictive. Her poems seem so simple until you really dig into them, and that duel simplicity and complexity is what really draws me into them.And for someone who spent most of her life in her home, Dickinson has some interesting insights into social life; in "I started Early - Took my Dog -", her depiction of male sexual pursuit is literally one of the most realistic things and intriguing things I've ever read.In short, Dickinson is delicious.

  • Riccardo Mainetti
    2019-02-21 13:05

    Questa raccolta di poesie, alcune più brevi (in certi casi oserei dire fulminanti nella loro brevità) altre più lunghe coprono un arco di diversi lustri e trattano, con uno stile impeccabile, svariati temi, dalla natura alla morte. Alcune di queste poesie sono state poi soggette ad una gestazione lunga e fatta di svariate modifiche che in certi casi sono state anche drastiche nel senso che hanno cambiato sensibilmente ed in certi casi anche radicalmente quello che era il testo originale.Per questa edizione la curatrice ha attinto di volta in volta a diversi testi critici.