Read You Don't Need Meat by Peter Cox Online

you-don-t-need-meat

The up-to-the minute latest news about meat-eating that our government and the meat lobby does not want us to know:--How likely is it that mad cow disease will happen here?--What are the latest additives being poured into our livestock feed, and how do these chemicals affect our children?--How is big business getting away with bombarding little kids with hours of meat adveThe up-to-the minute latest news about meat-eating that our government and the meat lobby does not want us to know:--How likely is it that mad cow disease will happen here?--What are the latest additives being poured into our livestock feed, and how do these chemicals affect our children?--How is big business getting away with bombarding little kids with hours of meat advertisements every day?--If you knew what was happening in the slaughterhouses, would you continue to eat meat?--If you knew what was happening in your arteries, would you continue to eat meat?...

Title : You Don't Need Meat
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780312303389
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 384 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

You Don't Need Meat Reviews

  • John Brownlow
    2019-04-21 08:43

    Re-read this recently. It was a book that changed my life when I first read it around 30 years ago and it turned me vegetarian overnight once I realised how much sufferring we put animals through just so we can kill (usually inhumanely!) and eat them when there is absolutely no need to do so. Now vegan!

  • Amber Dunten
    2019-04-08 07:44

    I still remember literally to the day when I read this book. That is because this book irrevocably changed my life. The change was traumatic at the time, but it was the best thing I have ever done, and quite possibly the best thing I ever will do, and I am so glad I did. It was Friday, February 11, 2005. I was in the public library, and You Don't Need Meat was on the "Librarian's Picks" shelf, eye-catching with its big, bold hamburger graphic. I had experimented with going vegetarian for a month a few years before, and I knew on some level if I wasn't ready to learn more about why I didn't need meat, I wouldn't dare pick it up and crack the cover, but I did. And you know what? It turns out Peter Cox is right-- I really don't need meat. I sat and I read it cover to cover over the following weekend. I cried. I put the book down and stared into space. I thought to myself, "I can't take this." No question, Peter Cox doesn't pull any punches. But I was compelled to pick it up again and kept reading. It was too gripping. I cried some more. I kept reading. I finished the book on Sunday, February 13, 2005. And then I thought, "I can't be a part of this machine anymore. I can't and I won't." I thought that over and over, hundreds of times over the next month. Peter Cox is right-- I really don't need meat. The next day was Monday, February 14, 2005. It was Valentine's Day. I celebrated with an act of love. I stopped eating animals. That very day. I couldn't stand the thought of putting another bite of dead flesh in my mouth. I made my boyfriend eat all the leftover meat that was in the house and went shopping for new groceries even though I really had very little idea of what to eat instead of meat. I subsisted on pasta and PB&J for the first few weeks. Interesting things happened after I quit eating meat. Within about 3 weeks, my frequent migraines, which had plagued me for years, virtually vanished. I stopped refilling my migraine medication because I didn't need it anymore. I also noticed that after an initial period of mild GI upset, my poo and my gas, although slightly more voluminous, was a lot less odorous. I guess you could say my shit literally doesn't stink, haha! I've now been vegetarian 9+ years, and have never regretted it. Peter Cox is right-- I really don't need meat.Cox hits all of the major non-religious reasons not to eat meat, which I categorize as roughly tripartite, with two subcategories in each: 1. Health: a. The problem of infectious disease b. The problem of chronic disease2. Environment: a. The problem of resource inefficiency b. The problem of pollution3. Ethics: a. The problem of death b. The problem of sufferingUp against all of these, we have... what? It tastes good??? There are plenty of other things that taste good, and we both know that's not enough to justify all the evils we do in the name of steak and bacon.There are easier places to start if you're not ready for the hard truths that Cox will tell you plainly. If you really don't think you can take it, start with these: Mad Cowboy by Howard Lyman (mainly environment)The China Study by T. Colin Campbell (mainly nutrition)Diet for a New America by John Robbins (animal ethics, but explained more gently than Cox)If you're a dyed-in-the-wool meater, I challenge you to read Cox and keep eating meat. If you can read Cox and keep eating meat after that, I won't say it makes you a stronger person than I. But I think we can both agree it makes you something I am not.

  • Merredith
    2019-04-06 09:38

    I'm not even a vegetarian, but this book looked good. And it was. It was written in a very accessible, interesting way, so that i didn't need to skim or skip like i often do in non fiction books. I will be reviewing this further on my blog soon, but I just wanted to say that everyone, meat eater or vegetarian, should read this. :)

  • caroline
    2019-04-02 05:38

    this book reads kind of like a text book. there are definitely parts that i just skimmed over because they were sooo boring.but - there were also parts that were really interesting to learn. like the health benefits of becoming a vegetarian/vegan.i chose to read it now because i had just decided to try being a vegetarian at the beginning of january. so far so good!

  • Michelle
    2019-04-18 03:50

    nothing new here but love that understated british humor - an easy read and a good intro to the subject if you're new to it...

  • Miranda
    2019-04-10 06:49

    Need I say more? A great argument for a vegetarian lifestyle.