Read Prinny and His Pals: George IV and the Remarkable Gift of Royal Friendship by Tom Ambrose Cora Sandel Online

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From the first biography of George IV in 1831 to the last in 2001, Mad King George’s son has commonly been held up to ridicule as a weak, selfish, and incompetent spendthrift, barely tolerated by his ministers, loathed by most of his family, and dependent on the emotional support of grasping mistresses. However, acclaimed historian Tom Ambrose—author of Godfather of the ReFrom the first biography of George IV in 1831 to the last in 2001, Mad King George’s son has commonly been held up to ridicule as a weak, selfish, and incompetent spendthrift, barely tolerated by his ministers, loathed by most of his family, and dependent on the emotional support of grasping mistresses. However, acclaimed historian Tom Ambrose—author of Godfather of the Revolution: The Life of Phillipe Egalité, Duc D’Orléans—has uncovered new details on "Prinny" that suggests that, for all his faults, George IV just may have been the most humane and amusing of all British monarchs, notwithstanding his love of the high life. Central to the story is the vast array of friends that populate a remarkable reign as Prince Regent and King. If Prinny, as they knew him, was so grotesquely foolish, how did he amass such a fascinating (and loyal) group of friends? Could any other British ruler count among his friends the country’s most brilliant playwright (Richard Sheridan), or the wiliest statesman (Charles Fox), or the greatest political philosopher (Edmund Burke), not to mention perhaps the biggest loveable rogues’ gallery London ever saw? The truth was that Prinny’s occasional buffoonery and imposing girth made him the perfect target for political satirists and cartoonists—at their zenith during his reign—and his high qualities have been consistently overlooked. This warm, funny, and affectionate portrait displays George at his very best: delighting some of the finest minds of his generation, easily winning over his subjects and his family as well as treating his lovers with care and concern—and roistering with all his pals....

Title : Prinny and His Pals: George IV and the Remarkable Gift of Royal Friendship
Author :
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ISBN : 9780720613261
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 240 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Prinny and His Pals: George IV and the Remarkable Gift of Royal Friendship Reviews

  • Dorian
    2018-12-02 03:06

    Rather a disappointing work, overall.The author's contention is that George IV did not deserve all the opprobrium heaped upon him, and was in fact a really nice guy, as evidenced by his myriad of cool friends. Unfortunately, I didn't feel he adequately demonstrated this. George IV may have been intelligent, charming, generous, and witty - but he was also juvenile, over-emotional, a drunkard, a gambler, and a shocking spendthrift. He didn't come across to me in this book as particularly likeable.Nor did all the cool friends stand out especially. Admittedly, when you're working with maybe half a dozen pages to a chapter, and you have up to half a dozen people who have to share those pages, you can't really go into much depth on any of them. But even given the limited space at his disposal, I thought the author failed to lift any of his characters out of the realms of cardboard cut-outs.I felt he also made a poor choice of structure for his book. Like Brian Fothergill in "The Strawberry Hill Set", he chose to give a chapter to each of his subject's different "sets" of friends - one for the rakes and gamblers, one for the secretaries, one for the artists, etc. Unfortunately, unlike Mr. Fothergill, Mr. Ambrose did a poor job of juggling his "sets" and the chronology of George IV's life. Information was given twice or more, in different chapters, and it was very hard to tell who knew who or what happened when.And finally, an anecdote in an early chapter is at best muddled and at worst factually inaccurate, leaving me unwilling to trust the accuracy of anything else in the book.

  • Rachel Knowles
    2018-11-17 07:57

    A very readable look at the different friendships formed by George IV, from the fashionable Beau Brummell to the architect John Nash, and from the disreputable company of the gambling Whig Charles James Fox to the devotion of the Scottish poet and author Sir Walter Scott.The book was different from other biographies of George IV that I have read because it centred on his friendships rather than other aspects of his life. But if its purpose was to convince me of George IV's gift for friendship, then I am not sure that it succeeded. Although the book told of the many friends that George had, it also related how so many of these friendships ended, sometimes very abruptly. I hold to the belief that George IV could be charming and generous when he chose, but that he was quick to desert even his closest friends when they offended him.

  • Yooperprof
    2018-11-29 04:57

    A lot of proofreading errors, and some factual errors, too.On the positive side, some of the chapters were fairly interesting, and I have to give the guy some credit for taking on the tough job of trying to portray George IV as something other than a dissolute and corpulent buffoon.

  • Laura Purcell
    2018-11-14 03:46

    I was disappointed to find a number of inaccuracies in this book, ranging from incorrect dates to referring to George's cousin Gloucester as his 'brother'. The conclusion that George IV was a 'man of the people' and loved by the working class thoroughly bemused me, as it is in direct conflict with all I have read and researched about this monarch.