Read The Psychology of The Sopranos: Love, Death, Desire and Betrayal in America's Favorite Gangster Family by Glen O. Gabbard Online

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Some have called it "The Sopranos Effect"--the quiet that descends just before a new episode of the hit TV series is aired. Stores are deserted, restaurants quiet--and for patients of distinguished psychoanalyst and author Glen Gabbard, desperate calls for help go unreturned. Why, Dr. Gabbard wondered, have the misadventures of a middle-aged thug won the largest audience iSome have called it "The Sopranos Effect"--the quiet that descends just before a new episode of the hit TV series is aired. Stores are deserted, restaurants quiet--and for patients of distinguished psychoanalyst and author Glen Gabbard, desperate calls for help go unreturned. Why, Dr. Gabbard wondered, have the misadventures of a middle-aged thug won the largest audience in HBO history? What is it about the characters and their relationships that draws us in so completely? What can we learn about ourselves from going inside the heads of these outlaws from New Jersey? In The Psychology of the Sopranos Dr. Gabbard draws on his vast professional experience (and his near-obsessive preoccupation with Tony's two "families") to delve into the psychology of the characters, the show's depiction of therapy, and how "The Sopranos" dramatically showcases the psychological ambiguities and conflicts in our own lives. Indeed, part of the show's popularity, he argues, is the spotlight it throws on viewers' psychological issues--from panic attacks and existential angst to codes of honor and moral indiscretions. With his tongue planted only lightly in his cheek, Gabbard poses the questions so many of us have pondered on Monday mornings: Is Tony's therapy working? And how is it possible for him and his "families" to reconcile the mundane and the monstrous? His answers will surprise and delight loyal fans. This book was not prepared, licensed, approved, or endorsed by any entity involved in creating or producing the "Sopranos" television series.Mafia don Tony Soprano, his family, his work "associates," and his therapist, Dr. Jennifer Melfi, have captured the imagination (and the fanatical devotion) of more than 11 million viewers. The show has garnered rave reviews for its writing and acting and has won a loyal following of educated viewers, who appreciate the sharp wit, the Machiavellian plot turns, and the Shakespearean character development of this extraordinarily well-crafted drama. Find the answers in The Psychology of the Sopranos: Is Tony a psychopath--or is he an American everyman putting bread on the table in the best way he knows how? Is Livia a modern-day Medea or a victim caught in mob mentality? Is Carmella an accomplice or an innocent? Who's more corrupt, Tony Soprano or Father Phil? Is Tony doomed to desire women who make him feel as bad as Mom did? Can a man who commits bad acts still teach his children to be good?...

Title : The Psychology of The Sopranos: Love, Death, Desire and Betrayal in America's Favorite Gangster Family
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780465027354
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 208 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Psychology of The Sopranos: Love, Death, Desire and Betrayal in America's Favorite Gangster Family Reviews

  • Sally
    2018-12-16 03:36

    My family and I are currently engaged in a "Sopranos" marathon - watching several episodes every evening...so it wasn't too far-fetched for me to pick up this book I gave Freddy for Christmas. What did surprise me, however, was how much I enjoyed it! It read easily and most engaging - not too terribly steeped in psycho-jargon and very engaging. I particularly recommend it to anyone who intimately knows the Soprano story.

  • Julie
    2018-11-24 21:44

    Admittedly, this book (which, by the way, has the most unwieldy title on the PLANET) caters to a fairly small niche market. Fortunately for me, I fall right into it! This book is for YOU, if (1) you LOVED The Sopranos television series, and have a fairly intricate knowledge of its characters and plotlines (as the writer of this book ASSUMES that you do, when making his analyses); (2) you have an interest in, and some basic knowledge of, college-level psychology; and (3) you are the type of person who will watch a show on television for an hour, and then spend ANOTHER hour chatting on the phone with your friend about the intricacies of what you just saw . . .Since I was absolutely OBSESSED with this show, back when it aired, and continue to miss it terribly, this book was like a nostalgic trip down memory lane for me. In analyzing the various psychological aspects of Tony's personality, as well as those of Dr. Melfi, Carmela, and Tony's children, A.J. and Meadow, Gabbard more or less revisits EVERYTHING that happened during the show's first four seasons, in just 182 pages. Reading this, I was surprised by how much I remembered from the early episodes of the show. And more surprised by how much I forgot . . .Maddeningly, since this book came out in 2002, later episodes were not discussed. This is not AT ALL Gabbard's fault, I know. But it bugged me TERRIBLY, because, having thoroughly absorbed the author's keen insights into the first half of the series, I AM SIMPLY DYING to know Gabbard's expert opinion of such later series events as: Tony's mercy killing of his cousin, to prevent him from being hit by an opposing mob family, those bizarre couple of episodes where Tony was in a coma, Vito being outed as a homosexual and subsequently wacked, Tony's murder of Christopher in the final season, and OF COURSE, that ingenious, but completely frustrating, fade-to-black, series finale.And yet, frustrating as the aforementioned absence was, it did nothing to lessen my enjoyment of this book. Gabbard's Psychology of the Sopranos takes the notion of "pop psychology" (or, perhaps, more accurately, "pop culture psychology") to a whole new level. If you are part of its niche market, it is a MUST READ!

  • Oliver
    2018-12-15 21:39

    Quite an interesting premise here. A practicing psychoanalyst writes a book about the fictitious therapy that takes place between Tony Soprano and his therapist in the TV show, and to a lesser extent reflects on portrayals of therapy in TV and film. I picked this up 2nd hand in a charity store, and since I was wading for the umpteenth time through a Sopranos box-set I thought I'd give it a go. Two precursors are worth mentioning. The first is that you'll need to know the TV show really well to get much out of this (I do). The second is that this book came out at the end of the third season of the Sopranos (Gabbard originally wrote a column in Slate Magazine) - that is to say, at the half way point. Consequently a few of Gabbard's judgments seem slightly comical with the benefit of hindsight. Moreover because he focuses so much on the therapist/patient relationship he sometimes rather ignores the fact the relationship exists as a narrative tool, and occasionally as a moral compass; as is ultimately seen in season six with the ending of the therapy. That said, if like me you haven't read much psychology it's quite an interesting introduction to Freud and concepts like transference and splitting. Sopranos creator David Chase has said that The Sopranos is about people who lie to themselves on a daily basis and the mess it creates, so there is ample material for this and many other books.

  • Kamal Latif
    2018-11-27 23:30

    I loved this book. Really great way to explore and present complex psychological ideas in a highly accessible way for Non-Psychologists. Using popular TV Drama characters we lived with for over 6 seasons of the show (although the book was written after series 3) the book explores themes such as the root of Tony and his mobster associates' violence, moral complexity and relationships with their mothers and women in general. Interesting to read about how Psychotherapy is portrayed in film and TV too. Highly recommended.

  • Rebeccah
    2018-12-08 01:56

    This book is a great read for anyone interested in The Sopranos and psychology, but who doesn't have a ton of background in the area of psychology. Honestly, I was hoping it would be a little bit more 'academic', since I'm using it to write a paper in one of my graduate classes, but overall it has some great insights. A pretty quick and easy read, despite it's heavy-sounding title.

  • Heidi
    2018-12-17 19:37

    Just started watching the Sopranos (I know, I'm a little slow) and read this to fill the gap between getting the next episodes from the library. It looks at how therapy is portrayed and used in the show and the psychological issues of the characters. If you're not addicted to the show, this probably won't be of much, if any, interest, but it was interesting as a light quick read.

  • Arvydas Sidorenko
    2018-11-29 23:46

    I guess it is as good as a book about TV serial on mafia can be. It literally goes through a list of the most prominent scenes and the author explains how he perceived them. Nothing scientific, but rather an easy read.

  • Gato
    2018-12-02 00:28

    Didn't love this, though based on the topic, I thought I would.

  • Carl
    2018-12-07 23:44

    Very insightful!!!!

  • Shannon
    2018-11-30 03:43

    Witty, clever, accessible. Aid in understanding psychoanalytic theory.Good insight on script writing and the crafting of a television drama.

  • Kim
    2018-12-07 01:36

    Started reading this a few years ago but never finished--it's more for people really interested in psychology than it is for fans, but still relatively interesting. I plan to finish it someday.

  • Andrew
    2018-12-02 23:51

    interesting stuff but nothing a fan wouldn't have picked up watching the show

  • Nicole G.
    2018-11-17 19:51

    Just like it says. Quick, intriguing read.