Read The Masters: Golf, Money, and Power in Augusta, Georgia by Curt Sampson Online

the-masters-golf-money-and-power-in-augusta-georgia

The Masters golf tournament weaves a hypnotic spell. It is the toughest ticket in sports, with black-market tickets selling for $10,000 and more. Success at Augusta National breeds legends, while failure can overshadow even the most brilliant of careers. But as Curt Sampson, author of the bestselling Hogan, reveals in The Masters, a cold heart beats behind the warm antebelThe Masters golf tournament weaves a hypnotic spell. It is the toughest ticket in sports, with black-market tickets selling for $10,000 and more. Success at Augusta National breeds legends, while failure can overshadow even the most brilliant of careers. But as Curt Sampson, author of the bestselling Hogan, reveals in The Masters, a cold heart beats behind the warm antebellum façade of this famous Augusta course. And that heart belongs to the man who killed himself on the grounds two decades ago. Club and tournament founder Clifford Roberts, a New York stockbroker, still seems to run the place from his grave. An elusive and reclusive figure, Roberts pulled the strings that made the Masters the greatest golf tournament in the world. His story--including his relationship with presidents, power brokers, and every golf champion from Bobby Jones to Arnold Palmer to Jack Nicklaus--has never been told. Until now.        The Masters is an amazing slice of history, taking us inside the presidency of Dwight D. Eisenhower, Augusta's most famous member. It is a look at how the new South coexists with the old South: the relationships between blacks and whites, between Southerners and Northerners, between rich and poor--with such characters as James Brown, the Godfather of Soul; the great boxer Beau Jack; and Frank Stranahan, the playboy golfer and the only white pro ever banned from the tournament. The Masters is a spellbinding portrait of a tournament unlike any other....

Title : The Masters: Golf, Money, and Power in Augusta, Georgia
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780375753374
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 304 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Masters: Golf, Money, and Power in Augusta, Georgia Reviews

  • Stephen Fogle
    2019-02-09 08:05

    Every golf fan dreams of making their hajj to experience golfs Mecca. Unfortunately, you might have better odds to win the lottery than you do to play a round at "The National." Luckily, us mere mortals can watch on TV or try to scalp weekly badges for upwards of $10,000. If you want the next best thing, read Curt Sampson's book,The Masters: Golf, Money, and Power in Augusta, Georgia.This book is packed full of interesting and entertaining anecdotes about Augusta and the tournament while also shedding light on its unsavory past. I love playing and watching golf and found that I learned a tremendous amount from this book which will make my experience at the 2018 Masters even better. If you want to enter an actual ticket lottery to win tickets at face value, click the link below and pray. https://tickets.masters.com/app/welcome

  • guillaume philippe choquet
    2019-01-30 06:07

    Great book !Take you behind the curtains of this institution Augusta as become, from the American civil war to the creation of the course and finally what it as become today a tournament everyone recognises even none golfers.

  • Jeff Edgens
    2019-02-01 09:20

    The Masters is two things at once – a disquisition on the social inequality of controlling white “masters” of the Augusta National and the City of Augusta itself. Then there is The Masters championship which separates the invited golf masters from the uninvited almost champions for the exclusive tournament. Sampson begins with how Augusta National sprung up from a former plant nursery to become an exclusive golf mecca for the well-heeled from all over the country. And how two men –one a northern taciturn financier and founder of a stock brokerage firm, Cliff Roberts; and, the other man a genteel Southerner and the greatest amateur golfer in the history of the sport, Bobby Jones, shared a common vision to build Augusta National. Clearly Roberts is the one to control Augusta National as the years go by and Jones is afflicted with a severe nervous disease rendering him nearly an invalid. Roberts’ takes a firm guiding hand to all affairs of Augusta National while shaping it into the discrete, confidential but revered tournament it is today. Sampson weaves a tale of those insiders vs outsiders and illustrates the dichotomy of Northeners vs Southerners, Augusta National caddies vs Personal caddies; Augusta vs non-Augustans and ending with Roberts’ suicide on the course he nurtured and built. The Masters is a great story on Augusta places and characters (the famous fighter Beau Jack, James Brown; the Bon Aire Hotel, etc.). Highly recommend for the golf enthusiast and anyone interested in southern and Augusta history.

  • Denise
    2019-02-22 04:19

    This is an interesting read but is a bit outdated and the writing style can be distracting. Seems like the author assumes the reader already knows a lot about golf. I read this book because I lived in Augusta, Georgia but am not a native but rather moved there in connection with the military.Candid portrait of Cliff Roberts who was the genius and devil behind the club and tournament. I love the Masters and have attened a numbe of times. This book tarnishes the polish a bit but there are still plenty of things to admire. This book is now somewhat out of date. The author was also a bit hampered by the refusal of some parties to be interviewed so an element of balance is missing a bit.

  • Nicole Conlan
    2019-02-05 03:19

    I enjoyed this because I'm a golfer, but if I weren't, I don't think I would have liked it nearly as much. The writing is lovely in some places and REALLY made me roll my eyes in others. Curt Sampson definitely tries to romanticize the past in a way that feels a little ham-fisted. The book is a little dated - it was first published in the 90s, and it shows. But if you like golf, it's an interesting look behind the scenes and I don't regret reading it.

  • Nick
    2019-02-07 08:58

    Fascinating history of the Augusta National Golf Club, and to a lesser extent the area around it. Tons of things I didn't know that I wish I read before going last week! Oh well.A quick read, this one ends sooner than you'd like it to. There needs to be an updated edition with the past 15 or 20 years covered. I will warn any reader though that the course will lose a tiny bit of its luster by the time you finish reading this, so beware!

  • Richard Lister
    2019-01-28 02:15

    If you've ever wondered about the blue bloods who are and have been a part of the Augusta National Golf Club, this is your book. Curt Sampson beautifully lays out the vision that Bobby Jones and Clifford Roberts held for the course they would create on an abandoned Augusta, Georgia nursery. The club's evolution along with its tournament is something anyone who has been glued to the Saturday and Sunday rounds of the Masters would want to discover. This book is the place to do just that.

  • Henry
    2019-01-23 08:23

    I compare this to "Ball Four", in that it was salacious when first published, but more "yawn" as time elapsed from publication. I guess i just expected something i hadn't heard before. I had the same feeling after finishing "Ball Four"

  • Major Doug
    2019-02-18 04:23

    Listened to this book: good information; less than optimal narration = told better stories than 'Augusta', but in a poorer fashion.

  • Benny
    2019-02-02 08:17

    loved it

  • Frank Ogden
    2019-02-06 05:20

    This is an excellent history of the Masters. Sampson takes you back to the very beginning. He also explains how the club continues to flourish.

  • Evan Kirby
    2019-02-18 06:15

    A fascinating read on how the Masters came to be and all the finagling, corruption and power behind the greatest tournament in the world.

  • Kyle Porter
    2019-02-15 06:15

    5 stars...granted I'd read Arabic if it was about Augusta.