Read Mr Noon by D.H. Lawrence Peter Preston Online

mr-noon

The first annotated paperback publication of Lawrence's autobiographical and strikingly innovative unfinished novel Begun in 1920, Mr Noon is divided into two distinct parts, the first of which appeared in 1934 and the second of which remained unpublished until the Cambridge edition of 1984, the first publication of the novel in full. Abandoning a promising academic careerThe first annotated paperback publication of Lawrence's autobiographical and strikingly innovative unfinished novel Begun in 1920, Mr Noon is divided into two distinct parts, the first of which appeared in 1934 and the second of which remained unpublished until the Cambridge edition of 1984, the first publication of the novel in full. Abandoning a promising academic career at Cambridge, Gilbert Noon returns to Whetstone, where he becomes a teacher at the local technical school. His rootlessness leads him into an inept experiment of 'spoony' love with a fellow schoolteacher, Emmie Bostock. The ensuing scandal causes him to flee to Germany, where he finds true passion in his developing relationship with Johanna, the unhappily married wife of an English doctor.For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators....

Title : Mr Noon
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780140189735
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 368 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Mr Noon Reviews

  • Sarah Magdalene
    2019-03-02 08:04

    Mr Noon Was a First Rate SpoonFound Mr Noon in the second hand bookshop the other day. Oh joy! A DHL I hadn’t read! It is unfinished and unedited (a process he took very seriously), and reading it, I get the feeling that a large part of his editing process involved toning down his wild and surreal silliness. It is full of narrative breaking, fanciful addresses to his reader who he is certain is female, because males are all so frightened of him. Frightened because he eviscerates them so brutally. He has the classic Virgoan ability to dissect and ridicule, and mercurial skills I am quite jealous of. He would have been excellent company, I am sure. This novel is very funny. I rather like him unedited. You get the real man, and this is worth a little disarray. It’s also mostly about the early days of him and Frieda, which makes for fascinating reading. What a unique man he was, most of all in how he saw women. I have never encountered another author so in love with what a woman REALLY is. Not some pious unreachable ideal, but the vital and furious blood magic of her. He is quite stunning really, as a personality, and undoubtedly the most significant author of the 20th century (if also the most misunderstood), as well as being the patron saint of vilified artists. He was a first rate poet as well, which makes his prose shine like the sun, edited or not. I love how he believes that everything worth doing is a fight, a struggle, including his tempestuous marriage. He has the grit of a coal miner and the erudition of an angel. Wonderful combination!

  • Diane Adam
    2019-02-21 05:09

    This is a difficult book to review because it was never finished; it was abandoned in 1921 and found among Lawrence's papers after his death. Also, it doesn't really have a plot as it's more a fictionalised account of the author's travels in Europe and his meeting with Frieda. However, the writing is as wonderfully descriptive as ever with lots of the word inventions that Lawrence does so well:sun-shimmering, dry-souled, bluey-effervescent, dawn-tender. Worth reading.

  • Krissy
    2019-03-23 10:26

    Do you love to spoon? There's an entire chapter dedicated to the art in this book.

  • Amanda
    2019-02-22 08:19

    very chatty, Mr. lawrence is awfully mean to his reader.

  • Lisa
    2019-03-18 05:14

    It was fun to read an unfinished work by D.H. Lawrence, especially since the story follows so closely to the author's own life. Passionate, over-the-top, and downright goofy at times, the author by turns abuses and seduces the reader. :-) A refreshing change of pace from the fiction I've been reading of late.

  • Satia
    2019-02-24 08:07

    I've read and enjoyed Lawrence before. Unfortunately, this book fell flat for me and by the time I reached part two I was too bored to continue with it. I can see why this was not published during his lifetime.

  • Richard Lodge
    2019-03-12 09:15

    Worth a look. It's written in a flippant, nudging sort of style that can get a little wearing, but it has a verve and a humour about it that make it entertaining for a while, at least. I can see why he didn't go on to finish it. I was not sorry when it ended. But I'm glad I took a look.

  • Peggy Aylsworth
    2019-02-24 04:28

    This is an engaging book. Lawrence's language is wondrous...better than muchof his other writing. It has a free-flowing sense...often directed to "gentlereader." There is humor as well as romance in this novel.

  • Kezia
    2019-03-16 04:22

    Alas, another unfinished work, but as one of his more autobiographical and personal works, it has a special place on the shelf.