Read From Cape Charles to Cape Fear: The North Atlantic Blockading Squadron during the Civil War by Robert M. Browning Jr. Online

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A list of U.S. naval vessels compiled in April 1861 contained only 90 names: 50 were sailing vessels, and the remaining 40 were propelled by steam. At the outbreak of the Civil War the navy had only three armed vessels ready for service on the Atlantic Coast, the remainder being either in the Gulf of Mexico or on foreign stations.President Lincoln proclaimed a blockade ofA list of U.S. naval vessels compiled in April 1861 contained only 90 names: 50 were sailing vessels, and the remaining 40 were propelled by steam. At the outbreak of the Civil War the navy had only three armed vessels ready for service on the Atlantic Coast, the remainder being either in the Gulf of Mexico or on foreign stations.President Lincoln proclaimed a blockade of Southern ports on April 19th, and on May 1st Flag Officer Silas Horton Stringham took command of the squadron blockading the Atlantic Coast from Alexandria, Virginia, to Key West, Florida. Stringham's command consisted of 14 gunboats and the Potomac Flotilla, but during the early months of the war the blockade was almost totally ineffective in restricting commerce in the coastal cities of North Carolina. Wilmington became the Confederacy's busiest port, as the navy focused attention on other Southern ports.As the war progressed Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles oversaw the construction of a large navy powered by steam, and by war;s end the United States possessed one of the largest and most powerful navies in the world. By early 1862 most of the ports in the operational area of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron were captured, forcing General Lee to elongate his supply line and making his army vulnerable to the success or failure of ships running the blockade. The Union armies in the eats depended upon the navy to maintain control of the interior waterways and to provide additional support services for its many military maneuvers.From Cape Charles to Cape Fear scrutinizes the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, which operated along the coast and inland waters of North Carolina and Virginia. This is not only an operational history, but also an examination of naval logistics, tactics, and strategy. Browning shows the many external influences on the blockade and naval operations, which both enhanced and inhibited their effectiveness.In the eastern theater the navy provided the army mobility, added firepower, and solid lines of communication. The North Atlantic Blockading Squadron successfully augmented Union army operations, although it was often crippled and decimated by logistical problems caused by commitment to a wide range of duties. From the perspective of the Union navy, this study clearly presents a startling and accurate picture of the role of the blockade in Civil War military history....

Title : From Cape Charles to Cape Fear: The North Atlantic Blockading Squadron during the Civil War
Author :
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ISBN : 9780817306793
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 472 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

From Cape Charles to Cape Fear: The North Atlantic Blockading Squadron during the Civil War Reviews

  • Jim
    2019-05-24 14:32

    The North Atlantic Blockading Squadron was responsible for blockading Virginia & North Carolina. It also provided crucial support for the Union armies in Virginia & North Carolina. During the winter of 1861-62 the Union navy captured Roanoke Island, Hatteras Inlet, Beaufort and many towns along the sounds and rivers in North Carolina. However it wasn't until 1865 that the navy and army captured Fort Fisher, the largest of the many forts and batteries guarding the approaches to Wilmington. Wilmington became the major port supplying the Confederacy.I've read Civil War naval histories that told the stories of the entire Union and Confederate navies but this is the first squadron level history I've read. If they haven't been written yet, I'd like to see squadron level histories for the other Union squadrons blockading the south Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico.This is a detailed history that looks at many aspects of the squadron: the crucial decision to only build steam powered naval ships; the restrictions the shallow waters of the sounds placed on the navy; the ineffectivness of the blockade; confederate blockade runners; shipboard life; how mechanical problems & the need to get more coal severely limited the amount of time a ship spent patrolling; and the blockade and eventual closure of Wilmington.I recommend this book to anyone interested in Civil War naval history.