Read Polari - The Lost Language of Gay Men by Paul Baker Online

polari-the-lost-language-of-gay-men

Polari is a secret form of language mainly used by homosexual men, in London and other cities during the twentieth century. Derived in part from the slang lexicons of numerous stigmatised and itinerant groups, Polari was also a means of socialising, acting out camp performances and reconstructing a shared gay identity and worldview among its speakers. This book examines thPolari is a secret form of language mainly used by homosexual men, in London and other cities during the twentieth century. Derived in part from the slang lexicons of numerous stigmatised and itinerant groups, Polari was also a means of socialising, acting out camp performances and reconstructing a shared gay identity and worldview among its speakers. This book examines the ways in which Polari was used in order to construct 'gay identities', linking its evolution to the changing status of gay men and lesbians in the UK over the past fifty years....

Title : Polari - The Lost Language of Gay Men
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ISBN : 9780415261807
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 215 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Polari - The Lost Language of Gay Men Reviews

  • Helen
    2018-11-10 07:56

    This is both fun and academic. I wonder if calling Polari a language is overstating things a bit? (the author seems to be saying so). The history of the origins of some of the words reveal a lot of influence from other sources such as back slang, London slang, cant, and the language of the theatre (with quite a bit of Italian influence); also, US slang, some of which arrived during the war. Some of the words in the lexicon at the end of the book are not specifically "secret" gay words at all. Some perceptive comments on language death (further subdivided as "language murder" and "language suicide") and some interesting LGBT history. If the author were looking for a further source for camp language and linguistic quirks he might like to consider the language in use at various Anglican theological colleges in the 1970s and 1980s.Bona.