Read The Mitford Murders by Jessica Fellowes Online

the-mitford-murders

It's 1919, and Louisa Cannon dreams of escaping her life of poverty in London, and most of all her oppressive and dangerous uncle.Louisa's salvation is a position within the Mitford household at Asthall Manor, in the Oxfordshire countryside. There she will become nurserymaid, chaperone and confidante to the Mitford sisters, especially sixteen-year-old Nancy - an acerbic, bIt's 1919, and Louisa Cannon dreams of escaping her life of poverty in London, and most of all her oppressive and dangerous uncle.Louisa's salvation is a position within the Mitford household at Asthall Manor, in the Oxfordshire countryside. There she will become nurserymaid, chaperone and confidante to the Mitford sisters, especially sixteen-year-old Nancy - an acerbic, bright young woman in love with stories.But then a nurse - Florence Nightingale Shore, goddaughter of her famous namesake - is killed on a train in broad daylight, and Louisa and Nancy find themselves entangled in the crimes of a murderer who will do anything to hide their secret . . ....

Title : The Mitford Murders
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780751567168
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 400 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Mitford Murders Reviews

  • Sandy *The world could end while I was reading and I would never notice*
    2019-03-27 10:50

    EXCERPT: 'As she moved along, stately but sure, like the Lusitania departing from Liverpool, she thought she recognized a figure out of the corner of her eye. It gave Florence a start. Did he know she would be at Victoria? The man was slight, angular and frayed at the edges - a wooden life raft to her ocean liner. His back was half turned away and his hat was pulled down low so that she couldn't be sure if he had seen her. Florence picked up the pace, her heart quickening. She spotted her Porter up ahead, waiting patiently by her bags, and she calmed herself. She had only to get on the train; in less than twenty minutes she'd be on her way. ....It was not long before the guard blew his final whistle. The train moved off, slowly at first, then gathered momentum steadily until, by the time it reached the first tunnel, it was rolling down the line at full speed. That was the last time anyone saw Florence Nightingale Shore alive. ..'THE BLURB: It's 1919, and Louisa Cannon dreams of escaping her life of poverty in London, and most of all her oppressive and dangerous uncle.Louisa's salvation is a position within the Mitford household at Asthall Manor, in the Oxfordshire countryside. There she will become nurserymaid, chaperone and confidante to the Mitford sisters, especially sixteen-year-old Nancy - an acerbic, bright young woman in love with stories.But then a nurse - Florence Nightingale Shore, goddaughter of her famous namesake - is killed on a train in broad daylight, and Louisa and Nancy find themselves entangled in the crimes of a murderer who will do anything to hide their secret . . . 'MY VIEWS: I didn't realize, when I began The Mitford Murders by Jessica Fellowes, that it is based on a real murder. It was not until I reached the end of the book and read the author's historical note, that I discovered Florence Nightingale Shore actually existed, that she was god-daughter of the famous woman herself, and that she was indeed attacked on the Brighton line Monday 12 January, 1920 and died a few days later of her injuries. Nobody was ever found guilty of her murder. The Mitford Murders is a captivating blend of fact and fiction. Newspaper reports of the interviews conducted with the witnesses at the Inquest have been used to recreate the events. People, including Florence's friend Mabel, the Mitford family and their servants, also have their roots in reality, although some things have been changed for the benefit of the novel. Fellowes has captured the atmosphere of the early 1920s splendidly. The war is over, but nothing has quite returned to normal. There is a shortage of men; many physically and psychologically wounded soldiers have returned home to nothing, wondering what it was all for. Life is nothing like we know it. The British class system is still very evident. Poverty is a way of life for the lower classes where survival is all, violence and intimidation a way of life . But then again, perhaps nothing has really changed after all, only fashion and technology. The Mitford Murders is a captivating read. Fellowes, perhaps best known for her Downtown Abbey books, is very good at what she does. This is, apparently, the first book of a new series,one I am looking forward to reading. Thank you to Hachette Australia via Netgalley for providing a digital copy of The Mitford Murders by Jessica Fellowes for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own. Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page for an explanation of my ratings. This review and others can also be viewed at sandysbookaday.wordpress.com

  • Susan
    2019-03-30 07:32

    I am a great lover of Golden Age mysteries, but often feel that modern novels which attempt to recreate that period feel, sometimes suffer from an attempt to make them modern and appeal to modern readers. In some ways, this novel is a good example of a mystery, set in the period 1919 – 1921, yet which is aimed at a modern audience and attempts to make the crime more realistic; yet, in doing so, loses some of the charm of those books. Louisa Cannon lives with her washerwoman mother, and her unscrupulous, vicious uncle, Stephen, in London. We first meet her on Christmas Eve, 1919, when she runs into an old friend, who is chaperoning Nancy Mitford. Jennie suggests that the Mitford’s need help in the nursery and offers to put in a good word for Louisa, which leads to her escaping her unhappy life and finding a job with the Mitford family. On her way to her interview, Louisa meets Guy Sullivan, a member of the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway Police and becomes embroiled in his attempt to solve the murder of Florence Shore. Florence Shore was murdered on a train, on her way to visit a friend, Rosa Peal, who lives above a teashop. By coincidence, Rosa is the twin sister of the Mitford’s beloved Nanny, meaning that Louisa has a link to the crime, as well as romantic feelings for Guy. Anyone who reads this book expecting the Mitford sisters to be central to the plot, may be a little disappointed. Louisa is working in the nursery as most of the sisters are very young (while their only brother is at boarding school for most of the time). Despite poor Nanny dealing with the little ones, Louisa seems to get the easy option for much of the time; accompanying the eldest, Nancy, as she throws herself, with abandon, into sleuthing. I liked the character of Louisa and also of Guy Sullivan. Both are slightly damaged – a little bullied, a little insecure – and they work well together. Of course, this could be the first in a series and so we may have more of the younger Mitford sisters as they grow, which gives the author plenty of scope in future. The character of Louisa’s Uncle Stephen works less well and his intrigues and aggressive nature seem a little out of synch with the feeling of the novel. Saying that, despite some parts of the story feeling a little over long, the author did get a good sense of the period. The shadow of WWI hangs over the story, and the characters, like a pall. There is a good sense of London after the war, but, for me, the parts that worked best were set within the Mitford household. If there is a sequel to this, I would certainly read it, but it seemed, at times, to be unsure of whether it was a modern crime novel set in the 1920’s or a really authentic attempt to write with the feel of the Golden Age, which did not quite work. Rated 3.5

  • Brenda
    2019-04-02 10:52

    Louisa Cannon lived with her mother, both quietly working for others as a seamstress and washerwoman. Things had been hard since her father died, but it had become much worse when her uncle arrived. Louisa was frightened of him, and her mother was too cowed to speak up. So Louisa kept out of his way while she dreamed of escape. One thing led to another and suddenly Louisa had the opportunity to work in Asthall Manor with the Mitford family – she would be a governess of sorts to the six children of the household, assisting the elderly Nanny Blor.Florence Nightingale Shore, goddaughter of the great lady, Florence Nightingale had resigned her commission as a nurse at Ypres and was travelling on the train from London when she was murdered. The police could find no evidence but young, aspiring Guy Sullivan of the Brighton and South Coast Railway Police was determined to find the truth. He had also taken a liking to Louisa when he’d assisted her in her travels to Asthall Manor. Meanwhile Louisa and Nancy, eldest daughter of the Mitford children, had their suspicions regarding Florence Shore’s death and decided to search for the killer themselves.The excitable Nancy had no sense of danger, but Louisa did – and her fear at what could happen had her on edge continually. But Guy had a dogged determination, even without his superior’s approval. What would be the outcome? Would the killer be found without any further bloodshed?The Mitford Murders by Jessica Fellowes is based on the real-life story of Florence Nightingale Shore and her death in 1920 plus the Mitford family who were also a real family. The story around the events are fictional and the Historical Note at the end of the book is of great interest. I thoroughly enjoyed this historical mystery, which is my first by this author – it actually reminded me a little of Agatha Christie’s work. I certainly didn’t pick the murderer (even though I was sure I had!) Highly recommended.With thanks to Hachette Australia for my copy to read and review.

  • Sheryl
    2019-04-13 07:33

    This is the first book I’ve read by this author; she's built quite a following over her "Downtown Abby" books. I love historical mysteries primarily set in post-war Britain. This book did not disappoint; the way Ms. Fellowes weaved the facts of the case with her own brand of fiction made this a terrific mystery. I must confess, I had no idea this book was based on a true story until I finished the book and read the author’s notes.Florence Nightingale Shore was a war nurse whose God Mother you guessed it was the famous nurse Florence Nightingale. Ms. Shore was a kindly woman who dedicated her life to helping others, she had decided to retire after the war and enjoy the rest of her life. She was on a train headed to the coast to visit a dear friend of hers when she was murdered. Her murder caused quite a stir, it was shocking that someone could be murdered on a train during the mid-day without any one noticing anything. Several other plots were going on throughout the book that kept the storyline from lagging. The Mitford family was introduced into the book when Lady Redesdale employed a young woman, Louisa Cannon to assist the loveable overworked Nanny Blor who needed more help caring for the ever-growing Mitford clan. Louisa was only 19 years old and running from her past and she was relieved to be hired to work for Lord and Lady Redesdale as a nanny. She had no experience and it was a dream come true when Lady Redesdale hired her. It gave Louisa a chance to start a new life for herself but one that she would have to take extra care that her past didn’t follow her to their home. The oldest child of the Mitford’s was the precocious Nancy Mitford who was 16 years old and was more than thrilled to have the young Louisa as a nanny. The two young girls became quite close, Louisa had her hands full trying to reel the headstrong Nancy in from getting them both into some serious trouble. I liked the characters of this book; they were well developed and believable. David Mitford who inherited the title of Lord Redesdale after his oldest brother died during the war, David Mitford was an officer during the war that claimed his brother’s life.The mysterious death of Florence Nightingale Shore was a constant during the entirety of this book. It was a major cause of contention and speculation between most of the main characters. I was glad to see that this is the first of a series and the second book is already in the works. I'll be purchasing that one for sure. Disclosure: I would like to thank the publisher and NetGalley for providing me with an e-galley of this book in exchange for my honest opinion. The opinion I expressed above regarding this book is my own.

  • Maine Colonial
    2019-04-05 09:55

    As someone who’s been reading about the Mitford family for years, I just couldn’t resist buying this book. But I wish I had.Much of the story plays out at the Mitfords’ estate in 1920, when the eldest child, Nancy, is 16 and the youngest, Deborah is born. Our main character, Louisa Cannon, age 18, has fled dire circumstances in London and been taken on as a nursery maid. Nancy latches on to Louisa because she is starved for variety and the companionship of someone close to her own age.The Nancy of this book is a silly, flighty, selfish girl. Obviously I don’t know what the real Nancy Mitford was like, but I certainly always got the impression from my reading that she was intelligent and had a biting wit. Certainly not the annoyingly vapid character Fellowes paints. Fellowes names the other members of the family and throws in a handful of descriptions easily gleaned from a little bit of reading. Otherwise they are just paper dolls Fellowes moves around as her story requires. There is certainly no use of the famous Mitford style of speech. The family in this book could be any family well enough off to have a small domestic staff. It’s clear to me that Fellowes chose to call this family the Mitfords purely for marketing purposes. Anyone who knows the Mitford history will find this book unsatisfying at best.The mystery plot is more of a why- and howdunnit than a whodunnit. Florence Nightingale Shore, a goddaughter of the famous nurse and a WWI nurse herself, has been murdered on a train. The railroad police and Scotland Yard quickly run out of leads and close the investigation. (Shore’s murder happened in real life and was never solved.) But railway policeman Guy Sullivan is determined to find out the truth and perhaps prove himself worthy to become a Scotland Yard detective.Guy meets Louisa early in the book, as she flees the (quite literal) clutches of her evil uncle and, thanks to the insatiable curiosity of Nancy about the Shore murder, Guy and Louisa work together to find the Shore killer.The mystery plot is slow to get going and I wouldn’t say it’s particularly inventive. I thought it was easy to figure out where it was going. Fellowes also overuses the tired bit from police procedurals in which interviewees complain about having to answer questions more than once. True to her relationship with Downton Abbey stories, Fellowes depicts cruelty to women, with their being helpless to resist or defend themselves. This is one of the reasons why I got tired of Downton Abbey. However period-accurate it may be, that doesn’t mean it adds to the reading experience if it is dwelled on.I’d call this barely adequate as a mystery and a thorough disappointment as Mitfordiana. I strongly suspect that the use of the Mitford name is a calculated attempt to capitalize on the appetite for stories featuring the intriguing Mitfords. I think if you’re going to do that, you owe it to readers to do more than a slap a few names and biographical details on characters who don’t otherwise particular resemble the real characters.Finally, I should note that if you insist on reading this book, whatever you do don’t get the audiobook. The reader is actually very good except when it comes to Nancy, for whom she uses a gratingly childish voice that seems the antithesis of what you would imagine Nancy Mitford was like. And, not surprisingly given the writing, none of the Mitfords use the Mitfordian accent.

  • Ange
    2019-04-19 09:45

    *2.5 stars

  • Angie
    2019-03-25 13:44

    3.5 stars, rounded up A fun period mystery, based upon a real unsolved murder, with plenty of appearances of real people from the era. It grabbed me from the beginning, with the murder of Florence Nightingale Shore. As it still remains a mystery today, I couldn’t wait to see where the story went. I’m also fascinated by the the Mitford sisters and looked forward to reading about them. Although I enjoyed the story, I think it could’ve been even better with more details. I would classify this as a “high end” cozy. I’m excited to read the next entry in the series and what the next adventures will be!**Many thanks to NetGalley, Jessica Fellowes, and St. Martin’s Press for an ARC to read and honestly review!**

  • Amanda - Mrs B's Book Reviews
    2019-04-01 13:42

    *Review to come.

  • Joanne D'Arcy
    2019-04-22 08:59

    The Mitford Sisters have always fascinated me. How six women made such an impact on social and political history throughout the twentieth century. The people they knew and associated with jump from the pages of a history book.When I first saw this title, I was intrigued. even more so when I learnt the author is related to Julian Fellowes* of Downton Abbey fame. There must be a storytelling gene somewhere in them there Fellowes!But whilst this is a story, this is also a book based in reality, based in truth but I am not going to give anymore away about what reality and what truth - because like me you can read the book and find out in the end.Louisa Cannon lives with her mother and an unpleasant Uncle, teetering on the border of poverty in London.She finds herself escaping her uncle and going to work at the Mitford's Oxfordshire home where she becomes a maid and companion to the Nanny and the small Mitford girls but also a friend and confidante with Nancy Mitford the eldest. Her life is going to change and Nancy sees Louisa as a way to escape the confines of being in society.Florence Nightingale Shore related to her namesake and a nurse as well finds herself on a train at the same time as Louisa, the two do not know each other but their lives are about to become entwined especially as one ends up dead and the other making her own investigations.This is a book which is a mix of fact made into wonderful fiction. The settings are perfect, the insight into the Mitford Sisters early upbringing intriguing although of course we  do not know how much poetic license has been taken, but the infamy perhaps gives you an idea of the characters they were when they were small.This really is a different murder mystery book, but also seems to sit right in the Golden Age Mystery category. I am intrigued as to how the next book will pan out and what fact or reality is going to be featured and just how will the Mitford's fit in. There is so much scope with setting yourself such a task.* His adaptation of Mary Poppins for the stage is phenomenal!

  • Myrna
    2019-03-24 14:36

    This was largely a book of fiction but based on real events and people after WWI. I liked Louisa and Nancy Mitford story more than the murder mystery of Nightingale. Good book but I didn’t love it like I was hoping. 3.5 stars!

  • Melanie
    2019-04-07 07:33

    The Mitford sisters have fascinated me for more than a decade, I read biographies, autobiographies, their letters, Nancy Mitford's novels etc. I don't think I am an expert, but I am familiar, so I think the main reason I found this book hard to deal with was the fact that I simply could not see any point in bringing the Mitfords into this otherwise fine murder mystery. The setting is 1919/1920 and a young girl from London tries to escape from her evil uncle and is glad to get a job as nursery maid with the Mitfords, on the same day she heads to the interview after jumping off a train to escape said uncle a retired nurse (the niece of that Florence Nightingale) was murdered on a train to the south coast. This is something that actually happened. The rest is mere speculation. There is various strands to this story, many people (not helped by the Mitfords themselves and their number of children) and it just felt that it should have been several novels rather than just the one. There is no doubt that Jessica Fellowes can write, the mystery itself was brilliant and if the Mitford bit was eliminated, I would have loved it. The Mitfords simply failed to add their normal glamour to this story.

  • Josephine Quealy
    2019-04-13 07:53

    *cue Cartman voice* Ah’m talkin’ fifth-season Night Court LAME.This was a dreary effort and I’ll not be delving further into the series. A drippy heroine, a plodding plot, and having Nancy saying ‘Farve’ every five seconds does not conjure up the world of the Mitfords. There’s a plot twist revealed halfway through that you’ll probably see coming and, even if you don’t, will NOT have you clutching your pearls. You’ll also most likely guess the killer. Utter drivel.

  • Emjy
    2019-04-04 12:55

    Un excellent Golden Mystery qui nous plonge dans le Londres des années 20 et nous entraîne jusqu'à Asthall Manor, le domaine de la famille Mitford. Ce polar est en fait multi genres. En plus d'une enquête policière intrigante et menée avec adresse, le roman se révèle aussi une comédie anglaise pleine d'humour, de rythme et d'émotion. A classer indéniablement parmi les satires upstairs / downstairs typiquement british, on y suit en effet le parcours de la jeune nanny des Mitford, de 2 ans ans plus âgée que Nancy, une jeune femme volontaire qui, tout comme le lecteur, fait la connaissance, un brin émerveillée, de cette famille fantasque (la pétillante Nancy en tête mais aussi Lord Redesdale, son père, un aristocrate ronchon, aux colères légendaires mais néanmoins attachant qui a inspiré le fameux Oncle Matthew de la romancière). Les autres personnages ne sont pas en reste, je pense par exemple à un jeune policier attachant et aux autres domestiques des Mitford.Jessica Fellowes livre ici un roman (le premier d'une série) très romanesque mais qui a l'excellent mérite de ne jamais tomber dans l'excès (Julian, son oncle, pourrait en prendre de la graine :p). C'est un divertissement de qualité, qui rend un hommage savoureux à Nancy Mitford.

  • Roman Clodia
    2019-03-30 08:45

    It was probably only a matter of time before someone turned Nancy Mitford into a detective! This is set between 1919-21 when Nancy is 16-18 with a climax at her coming-out ball. She's bright and sassy, with some traces of her famous wit but Fellowes gets away with it by making her so young. The other 'Mitford gals' are more or less children and babies and don't play much part in this. The main characters are Louisa, a run-away working-class nanny and friend to Nancy, and her romantic interest, a transport policeman whose bad vision made it impossible for him to fight in WW1.This is light and easy reading but I found it disconcerting that there are moments of darkness that feel a bit out of place in something so frothy and fun: Louisa's abusive uncle and his plans to prostitute her feel like they've wandered in from another book altogether. Anyone who reads a lot of crime fiction will have spotted the 'twist' as soon as it appears - but a fun read for fans of cosies and Golden Age crime.

  • MetLineReader
    2019-04-06 09:51

    I absolutely loved this book. Jessica Fellowes evokes the 1920s very well and you are transported into the lives of The Mitfords. From humble beginnings in London, the nascent transport police on the Brighton line and service at The Mitfords, there are many strands to this tale.I must confesss that I found the initial chapters confusing but persisted and am very glad I did. I loved Louisa and the policemen which brought a more human angle to the book. Very enjoyable and a bit different - although, given the author's pedigree, it has echoes of Downton Abbey. It didn't really need the Mitfords but it does lend the book a thread that no doubt will be followed throughout the series.I look forward to the next book in the series.

  • Lindsay
    2019-04-02 11:56

    Oh my Lord, this book is BAD! I don’t know if I’m more bothered that the crime element was so weak it would have struggled to make an engaging novella, or that the Mitfords have somehow been reduced to insipid blandness.Don’t even get me started on the ending - you CANNOT just decide that an actual real person who was never even charged let alone suspected, was guilty of the murder. A real person who was a good friend. Who was involved in running the memorial to Florence Nightingale Shore. That’s just...terribly non-U!Not saying I won’t read the sequel though - I think I more love-to-hate-it than outright hate it?! Although I will be SHOCKED if the series makes it to the end of the planned 6 volumes (one for each sister). If we get to Debo I will eat my cloche!

  • Robyfri
    2019-04-02 08:37

    Chiudo l’ultima pagina del libro e mi sento esclamare: “mioddio che soporifero!”.Ebbene sì, concilia il sonno e questo accade quando il ritmo narrativo è eccessivamente lento, cosa che non dovrebbe affatto succedere in un romanzo giallo, che anzi dovrebbe tenerti sulle spine e farti divorare le pagine, grazie ad una buona dose di suspense e al ritmo incalzante con cui si susseguono le indagini.Purtroppo però qui non ho trovato niente di tutto questo, se non, forse, nelle ultime cinquanta pagine, dove oramai era giunto il momento per l’autrice di tirare le somme e di svelare l’assassino, dopo averla tirata per le lunghe per ben trecento pagine, con inutili descrizioni, che all’avanzamento del caso non servivano affatto e con inutili ripetizioni: ogni volta che Guy o Louisa o Nancy pervenivano a una qualche scoperta o intuizione se lo raccontavano l’un l’altro, come è giusto che sia, ma l’autrice poteva anche fare a meno di ripetere ogni volta le stesse cose, si possono fare anche le ellissi, ogni tanto…Inoltre ho riscontrato una frase ripetuta tale e quale poche pagine più avanti, come se il romanzo non fosse stato sufficiente riletto e limato (nei tempi antichi esisteva il paziente “labor limae” dello scrittore, che a quanto pare oggi è del tutto scomparso!).Per carità, non voglio affossare completamente il romanzo, la storia è anche bella, tutto sommato scritta anche con una sintassi scorrevole e piacevole, ma la vicenda parallela di Louisa secondo me all’economia della vicenda, ossia l’indagine sull’assassinio dell’infermiera Florence, non è servita granché, mi è sembrata una forzatura della trama.E poi vogliamo parlare del lieto fine alla “e tutti vissero felici e contenti” con la redenzione improvvisa della “pecorella smarrita” grazie a due minacce di un ex militare? Come far cadere tutta l’impalcatura di un giallo che poteva essere molto più intrigante!In compenso ho bevuto ettolitri di tè e d’altronde per una vicenda ambientata a Londra negli anni ’19-’21 è comprensibile, ma sinceramente sarebbe basta qualche tazza, anche per non far fare indigestione agli accaniti consumatori di caffè come me. (lol)Ci sono comunque due cose che mi sono davvero piaciute in questo romanzo, uno è l’aspetto storico, i personaggi protagonisti sono realmente esistiti, così come l’assassinio è reale fatto di cronaca dell’epoca, mai però risolto; l’altro è l’evoluzione e la maturazione di Louise che da ragazzina appena diciottenne paurosa e impacciata è diventata nei due anni di snodo della vicenda, forte, sicura di sé e volitiva. Solo per questi due motivi, tutto sommato, sono contenta di aver letto questo libro e mi sentirei anche di consigliarlo, seppur con tutti i limiti evidenziati.

  • Vikki P
    2019-04-15 08:40

    I received an e-ARC of The Mitford Murders by Jessica Fellowes from NetGalley and the publishers in exchange for an honest review.The Mitford Murders is set in the 1920s and surrounds the investigation of the murder of Florence Nightingale Shore on a train. I found out after I had finished the book that the murder is a true story although the killer was never found. That being said, lets move on to what I thought of the book.PlotAs far as the murder investigation goes, the book had a terrific plot! There were twists and turns that left you dumbstruck and the journey to the end was filled with interesting revelations, although the book did start out slightly slow and took a long time to get to the point. The book had a very classic mystery feel to it – kind of like how an investigation progresses in Agatha Christie novels.CharactersSince I personally knew nothing about the Mitford Sisters, I did find them kind of dull. However, I did research them on my own later and was quite intrigued by their lives. I feel like the book would be far more interesting for people who know a little about them before they started reading the book. As for the fictional characters of Louisa and the investigating police officer Guy, I really did enjoy reading them. They were sweet, simple, smart and quite remarkable.Overall, the Mitford Murders by Jessica Fellowes gets 4 out of 5 stars from me.

  • La contessa rampante
    2019-04-06 10:59

    Nancy Mitford, lo scorso anno, è entrata in punta di piedi nella mia vita di lettrice con “L’amore in un clima freddo”, un romanzo molto piacevole in cui l’autrice ironizza sui vizi e le abitudini appartenenti all’aristocrazia dei primi anni del Novecento. Ne “L’assassinio di Florence Nightingale Shore” l’ho ritrovata, invece, nei panni di una giovane investigatrice che insieme alla sua governante, Louisa Cannon, ed al poliziotto Guy Sullivan, riesce a risolvere un caso di omicidio. Questo giallo scritto da Jessica Fellowes, lo definirei molto piatto e statico, in quanto durante la narrazione non riuscirete neanche a porvi la domanda “chi è il colpevole?” visto che è facile comprenderne l’identità fin dalle prime pagine, ma questo non è un male. Infatti, è quello che c’è oltre le indagini a colpire il lettore: la difficile vita di Louisa, l’insoddisfazione di Guy, la smania di apparire di Nancy ecc. Sono proprio queste storie e la voglia di un riscatto da parte dei protagonisti a rendere interessante la narrazione e a far sì che io vi consigli la lettura di questo romanzo. Cara Neri pozza, quando pubblicherai il secondo volume de “I delitti Mitford”? Spero che ciò accada molto presto!

  • Brenda Kittelty
    2019-04-12 07:50

    Do yourself a favour... and give this overly long, nonsensical insult to the mystery/crime genre a really wide berth. Anyone who can make the famously eccentric Mitford family appear so dull and boring deserves some sort of reverse commendation. And to pin the based-on-real-events-murder on an actual person, whom the author admits was blameless in her epilogue, is sailing close to the winds of defamation and slander. This book was ten kinds of crap. Why in the hell did I persist?

  • Susan
    2019-04-01 13:45

    1919, and Louisa Cannon by a stroke of luck is employed as a nursery maid in the Mitford household at Asthall Manor. But on the same train that Louisa had been travelling previously that day, Florence Nightingale Shore, is killed. Louisa, Nancy Mitford with Sergeant Guy Sullivan seem determined to find the murderer. I didn't really get an connection to the characters, I didn't really find them interesting enough. I have no idea if the Mitfords have been portrayed accurately (they were not the reason for reading the book) I was more interested in reading a murder mystery story. With that in mind and that I didn't particularly like the writing style, it was an just about interesting enough to get me to the end of the book.A NetGalley Book

  • Dana Loo
    2019-04-01 13:42

    Caso intrigatissimo, forse fin troppo, narrazione lenta, a volte dispersiva. La presenza dei Mitford piuttosto secondaria e comunque "sobria"rispetto a quelli che sono i protagonisti principali di questo mistery che si sviluppa tra realtà storica e fantasia: Louisa Cannon e Guy Sullivan.Molti passaggi e sviluppi della vicenda, compreso qualche personaggio legato alla vita privata di Louisa , non del tutto convincenti...

  • Amanda
    2019-04-13 09:47

    I really couldn't connect with this writing style. It was the type of book where I would read a chapter and would not be able to tell you what happened. Although others might enjoy the novel it was not the right book for me.

  • Giulia_lamadeleine
    2019-04-11 13:53

    Abbastanza anonimo

  • Sheryl
    2019-03-25 14:45

    This is the first book I’ve read by this author; she's built quite a following over her "Downtown Abby" books. I love historical mysteries primarily set in post-war Britain. This book did not disappoint; the way Ms. Fellowes weaved the facts of the case with her own brand of fiction made this a terrific mystery. I must confess, I had no idea this book was based on a true story until I finished the book and read the author’s notes. Florence Nightingale Shore was a war nurse whose God Mother you guessed it was the famous nurse Florence Nightingale. Ms. Shore was a kindly woman who dedicated her life to helping others, she had decided to retire after the war and enjoy the rest of her life. She was on a train headed to the coast to visit a dear friend of hers when she was murdered. Her murder caused quite a stir, it was shocking that someone could be murdered on a train during the mid-day without any one noticing anything. Several other plots were going on throughout the book that kept the storyline from lagging. The Mitford family was introduced into the book when Lady Redesdale employed a young woman, Louisa Cannon to assist the loveable overworked Nanny Blor who needed more help caring for the ever-growing Mitford clan. Louisa was only 19 years old and running from her past and she was relieved to be hired to work for Lord and Lady Redesdale as a nanny. She had no experience and it was a dream come true when Lady Redesdale hired her. It gave Louisa a chance to start a new life for herself but one that she would have to take extra care that her past didn’t follow her to their home. The oldest child of the Mitford’s was the precocious Nancy Mitford who was 16 years old and was more than thrilled to have the young Louisa as a nanny. The two young girls became quite close, Louisa had her hands full trying to reel the headstrong Nancy in from getting them both into some serious trouble. I liked the characters of this book; they were well developed and believable. David Mitford who inherited the title of Lord Redesdale after his oldest brother died during the war, David Mitford was an officer during the war that claimed his brother’s life.The mysterious death of Florence Nightingale Shore was a constant during the entirety of this book. It was a major cause of contention and speculation between most of the main characters. I was glad to see that this is the first of a series and the second book is already in the works. I'll be purchasing that one for sure. Disclosure: I would like to thank the publisher and NetGalley for providing me with an e-galley of this book in exchange for my honest opinion. The opinion I expressed above regarding this book is my own.

  • Joyce
    2019-04-06 13:43

    Louisa Cannon escapes her life of poverty and her mean uncle by obtaininga position in the Mitford household as a nursery maid. The year is 1920and Louisa and Nancy, the oldest daughter in the house become friends.Florence Nightingale Shore is killed on a train and the two girls becomeentangled in the crimes. I enjoyed this story with its twists and life ofMorals and manners among the rich in this time period in England and of ayoung girl who wishes to be a writer. It was a delightful light mystery.

  • Melisende d'Outremer
    2019-03-28 10:54

    Having read about the Mitford sisters in both Laura Thompson's "Take Six Girls" and Mary Lovell's "The Sisters", I was naturally quite intrigued as to how one of the Mitford girls was going to feature in a murder mystery.Louisa Cannon is a young woman looking to escape a harsh life in London in 1920. A chance meeting of an old friend leads to an introduction to the young Nancy Mitford, and for Louisa, the possibility of creating a new life when informed of a newly vacant position within the Mitford household.It seems that as Louisa is escaping the clutches of her evil uncle, a woman, Florence Nightingale Shore, is attacked a left for dead aboard a train. The two stories, told independently, begin to merge as the investigation onto Florence's death takes place, and by coincide, Louisa and Nancy Mitford slowly become involved.The story build slowly, characters cross our paths as the investigation progresses, and we are treated to an insight in the lives not only of the gentry in the early post-war years but also those who returned from the fighting. The empathy and identification with Louisa developed as the story progressed.I enjoyed the fact that this was a fictionalised account of the very real murder of Florence Nightingale Shore, with the author offering a resolution of sorts. I particularly liked the occasional interspersion of letters written by Florence from the front which gave a little background to current events.I'll be very interested to see how the Mitfords are introduced into the next in the series - obviously as this is #1 there follows that there will be a second book.

  • Robin Stevens
    2019-04-06 10:37

    An enjoyable historical mystery - but I think I was hoping for the Mitfords to be more central to the plot, and for their unique style of speaking and writing to be reflected in the book. A clever idea, though, and a promising start to the new series. (14+)*Please note: this review is meant as a recommendation only. Please do not use it in any marketing material, online or in print, without asking permission from me first. Thank you!*

  • Bron
    2019-03-28 13:59

    ** I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own**This was a completely fine murder mystery (think Phryne Fisher if the maid was the 'detective'), but I felt a bit let down by the Mitford connection being completely incidental and of no consequence in the story at all - I feel like the cover/blurb built it up a bit, but really Nancy was the only Mitford involved in the story and she could have been anyone. Maybe this will be built on in future books in the series?

  • Carole
    2019-03-29 14:53

    A good old fashioned murder mystery, perfect for Agatha Christie fans, this was a nice easy read with a couple of plots twist along the way. Based on real people and events, but largely fiction. It didn't really say a lot about the Mitford sisters (the eldest is only 16 an the start of the book), and Louisa their servant wasn't as fully developed as a character as she might have been, but an enjoyable read none the less.