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Pared down to cold hard facts, surrogacy is the commissioning/buying/ renting of a woman into whose womb an embryo is inserted and who thus becomes a ‘breeder’ for a third party. Surrogacy is heavily promoted by the stagnating IVF industry which seeks new markets for women over 40, and gay men who believe they have a ‘right’ to their own children and ‘family foundation’. PPared down to cold hard facts, surrogacy is the commissioning/buying/ renting of a woman into whose womb an embryo is inserted and who thus becomes a ‘breeder’ for a third party. Surrogacy is heavily promoted by the stagnating IVF industry which seeks new markets for women over 40, and gay men who believe they have a ‘right’ to their own children and ‘family foundation’. Pro-surrogacy groups in rich countries such as Australia and Western Europe lobby for the shift to commercial surrogacy. Their capitalist neo-liberal argument is that a well-regulated fertility industry would avoid the exploitative practices of poor countries. Central to the project of cross-border surrogacy is the ideology that legalised commercial surrogacy is a legitimate means to provide infertile couples and gay men with children who share all or part of their genes. Women, without whose bodies this project is not possible are reduced to incubators, to ovens, to suitcases. And the ‘product child’ is a tradable commodity who has never consented to being a ‘take away baby’: removed from their birth mother and given to strangers aka ‘intended parents’. Still, those in favour of this practice of reproductive slavery speak of ‘Fair Trade Surrogacy’ and ‘responsible surrogacy’. In Surrogacy: A Human Rights Violation Renate Klein details her objections to surrogacy by examining the short- and long-term harms done to the so-called surrogate mothers, egg providers and the female partner in a heterosexual commissioning couple. Klein also looks at the rights of children and compares surrogacy to (forced) adoption practices. She concludes that surrogacy, whether so-called altruistic or commercial can never be ethical and outlines forms of resistance to Stop Surrogacy Now. www.stopsurrogacynow.com It is the global advertising campaigns that groom infertile couples and gay men that have led to the establishment of multibillion cross-border industries: money made literally from women’s flesh....

Title : Surrogacy: A Human Rights Violation
Author :
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ISBN : 9781925581034
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 220 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Surrogacy: A Human Rights Violation Reviews

  • Hannah Ens
    2018-09-03 15:03

    While the title makes the author's opinion of surrogacy clear, don't dismiss it out of hand if you hold a different view. Far from being an ultra-conservative manifesto, Klein references a wealth of resources, including quotes and viewpoints from pro-surrogacy parties, which are presented without malice before being critically examined. She also makes a point to mention her pro-abortion stance and recognizes prominent gay leaders in the anti-surrogacy movement. "Surrogacy" starts at square one by describing in easily understandable terms the concepts that will be discussed throughout, including traditional vs. gestational surrogacy, altruistic surrogacy, the use of egg and sperm donors, and a brief overview of the class, racial and socio-economic divides that permeate surrogacy.From there it progresses naturally to a range of organized topics including short- and long-term harms, effects on the children involved, ethics, regulation vs. abolition, a history of anti-surrogacy efforts and Klein’s ultimate conclusion to stop surrogacy now. I found the entire book to be quite readable in regard to language and industry terminology, with the chapter on regulation as a slight exception. Readers may feel bogged down by listings of various conventions and committees with longwinded names, but Klein does make sure to distill extended descriptions down to the key points, with helpful references to other sections of the book as their topics overlap.The international scope of surrogacy makes this book applicable for global audiences. Though the author is Australian and often lists Australian cases as examples, the ethics of surrogacy are not bound by borders. Stories and references involving the United States are present, and highly applicable, as the U.S. is one of the few countries where both altruistic and commercial surrogacy are (in certain states) allowed. “Surrogacy: A Human Rights Violation” tears down pro-surrogacy arguments from too many angles to cover here, but they all flow back to soundly support what Klein declares in the title. Commercialization, eugenics, entitlement; a dozen doors are opened for readers to pursue further research after this introduction. “Surrogacy: A Human Rights Violation” is not a personal attack or vendetta; it’s not a call to vote a certain way or endorse a certain person. At its core, this book strives to promote the rights and welfare of women and children, and that’s a cause that transcends party lines and international borders.