Read The Political Culture of the American Whigs by Daniel Walker Howe Online

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Howe studies the American Whigs with the thoroughness so often devoted their party rivals, the Jacksonian Democrats. He shows that the Whigs were not just a temporary coalition of politicians but spokesmen for a heritage of political culture received from Anglo-American tradition and passed on, with adaptations, to the Whigs' Republican successors. He relates this cultureHowe studies the American Whigs with the thoroughness so often devoted their party rivals, the Jacksonian Democrats. He shows that the Whigs were not just a temporary coalition of politicians but spokesmen for a heritage of political culture received from Anglo-American tradition and passed on, with adaptations, to the Whigs' Republican successors. He relates this culture to both the country's economic conditions and its ethnoreligious composition....

Title : The Political Culture of the American Whigs
Author :
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ISBN : 9780226354798
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 414 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Political Culture of the American Whigs Reviews

  • Don Incognito
    2019-03-27 19:35

    SECOND REVIEW - September 25, 2017The Political Culture of the American Whigs should not be the only book you read to learn about the 19th-century Whig party.The key to the book's huge limitation is in the title: the phrase "political culture." It's erroneous: the book is about the philosophical and intellectual predispositions of the Whigs, not any aspect of their politics. I read it five or six years ago, but frankly I remember that their was relatively little discussion of the Whigs in politics. If that's what you really want to know, you will be disappointed. From this book you will learn learn such interesting things as the nature of Abraham Lincoln's poetry (which the author snobbishly judges second-rate or amateurish) and the eccentricities of Massachusetts statesman Rufus Choate.The book takes great care to avoid discussing topics that would make the Whigs look bad, such as "internal improvements" or why the Whig Party fell apart before the Civil War. The author obviously writes from a sympathetic viewpoint._______________________________________First Review - 2011This is an essential book on the 19th-century American Whig party. It explains what the Whig party was; what it stood for; what it did in politics; who its opponents were, how and why it officially died out (but unofficially survived in its similar successor, the Republican Party) and who its prominent members were.Although highly informative, it is obviously biased in favor of the Whigs. It doesn't whitewash them, but has little or nothing critical to say about them. For instance, it makes little or no attempt to explore the downside of their strong belief in "internal improvements" (essentially, using government subsidies to stimulate economic development in ways they liked). The only time the Whigs really look bad in this book is when it explains why the Whig party fell apart. That was over slavery: the Whig Party opposed slavery, but was willing to compromise on it in order to keep the Union from fracturing; but when the sectional conflicts became too intense to be saved through compromise, the Southern Whigs--many of whom were rich slaveholders--sided with the South and openly expressed white supremacist views. The Northern Whigs were just as resolutely anti-slavery, and the irreconcilable opposition split the party. The Southern Whigs mostly became Democrats, while the Northern Whigs formed the Republican party, whose only substantial policy difference from the Whigs was refusing to compromise on slavery.This book told me what I wanted to know about the Whigs. Now if only I can find a similarly illuminating book about the 19th-century Democrats and their viewpoint.

  • Christopher
    2019-04-24 19:41

    A brief but fascinating introduction to an almost forgotten pillar of America's political and social development in the 19th century. The chapter on Lincoln is especially interesting, clarifying the impossibility of understanding Lincoln without understanding the Whig system that shaped his personal and professional development.

  • Dayla
    2019-03-27 19:43

    Lincoln was a member of the Whigs. Need we say more? This is a great book written by a man who visited our school district. For this book alone (and everyone who attended received a copy), it was worth sacrificing five evenings.

  • Ashley
    2019-03-28 18:35

    This book makes the Whigs interesting, if not downright fascinating-- something I did not expect to say. It's a detailed (but not boring) explanation of the party's politics, philosophy, and culture. I highly recommend it.

  • Mrjeffreymiller
    2019-04-06 22:37

    fantastic - a great well rounded view on antebellum political history.

  • Ben Rothman
    2019-04-02 19:47

    Lively account of a dead political party.