Read Culture Care: Reconnecting with Beauty for Our Common Life by Makoto Fujimura Mark Labberton Online

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"Culture is not a territory to be won or lost but a resource we are called to steward with care. Culture is a garden to be cultivated."Many bemoan the decay of culture. But we all have a responsibility to care for culture, to nurture it in ways that help people thrive. In Culture Care artist Makoto Fujimura issues a call to cultural stewardship, in which we become generati"Culture is not a territory to be won or lost but a resource we are called to steward with care. Culture is a garden to be cultivated."Many bemoan the decay of culture. But we all have a responsibility to care for culture, to nurture it in ways that help people thrive. In Culture Care artist Makoto Fujimura issues a call to cultural stewardship, in which we become generative and feed our culture's soul with beauty, creativity, and generosity. We serve others as cultural custodians of the future.This is a book for artists, but artists come in many forms. Anyone with a calling to create―from visual artists, musicians, writers, and actors to entrepreneurs, pastors, and business professionals―will resonate with its message. This book is for anyone with a desire or an artistic gift to reach across boundaries with understanding, reconciliation, and healing. It is a book for anyone with a passion for the arts, for supporters of the arts, and for "creative catalysts" who understand how much the culture we all share affects human thriving today and shapes the generations to come.Culture Care includes a study guide for individual reflection or group discussion....

Title : Culture Care: Reconnecting with Beauty for Our Common Life
Author :
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ISBN : 33845728
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 160 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Culture Care: Reconnecting with Beauty for Our Common Life Reviews

  • Ben Palpant
    2019-05-22 19:33

    I respect Makoto Fujimura very much and his efforts to reclaim a properly hopeful view of culture has deeply influenced me as both teacher and writer. I find the culture war narrative so common amongst Christians to be very unhelpful when it comes to actually building a culture. We find ourselves condemning cultural artifacts (as we should) but ill-equipped to understand the purpose behind the artifacts and Ill-equipped to displace them with anything better. I take issue with him on several theological points. He prematurely suggests that denominations and church buildings have largely lost the light and power of God. He also flirts with a pluralism I cannot condone, but his call to culture care is antithetical to the culture war that pervades evangelical circles and I applaud him for that. I also applaud his fight against pragmatism and his encouragement to artists who find themselves on the margins, both societally and within the church. His call to think generatively and generationally is too much neglected amongst Christians."Culture is not the territory to be won or lost but a resource we are called to steward with care. Culture is a garden to be cultivated." "Well nurtured culture becomes an environment in which people and creativity thrive... at the most basic level, we call something generative if it is fruitful, originating new life for producing offspring, or producing new parts. When we are generative, we draw on creativity to bring into being something fresh and life-giving... it is constructive, expensive, affirming, growing beyond the mindset of scarcity.""I am not a Christian artist. I am a Christian, yes, and an artist. I dare not treat the powerful presence of Christ in my life as an adjective. I want Christ to be my whole being... It is time for followers of Christ to let Christ be the noun in our lives, to let our whole being ooze out like a painter's colors with the splendor in the mystery of Christ, the inexhaustible beauty that draws people in."

  • Dave Weiss
    2019-05-03 14:28

    Creative ministry has been a passion of mine for nearly two decades so it should be of no surprise that I loved this book. Makoto Fujimura has been at the forefront of this movement for a long time. He's an amazingly talented artist, writer and speaker, as well as being the founder the International Artists Movement (IAM). This book is a breath of fresh air for creatives in the church. I think the book is best summed up from the quote on the back cover. "Culture is not a territory to be won or lost but a resource we are called to steward with care. Culture is a garden to be cultivated." This book goes well beyond theories and is carefully thought out by a man who clearly loves both the arts and the church.The book includes a study guide for group discussion. This would be a great resource for arts groups or individuals who want to putter talents to use to the glory of God. This is a great book.

  • Philippe Lazaro
    2019-05-26 18:21

    “An industrial map in the mid-twentieth century colored New York’s Hudson River black. The mapmakers considered a black river a good thing—full of industry! The more factory outputs, the more progress. When that map was made, “nature” was widely seen as a resource to be exploited. Few people considered the consequences of careless disposal of industrial waste. The culture has shifted dramatically over the last fifty years.”.“When I share this story today, most people shudder and ask how anyone could think of a polluted river as good. But today we are doing the same thing with the river of culture. Think of the arts and other cultural enterprises as rivers that water the soil of culture. We are painting this cultural river black—full of industry, dominated by commercial interests, careless of toxic byproducts—and there are still cultural mapmakers who claim that this is a good thing.”–Makoto FujimuraBook No. 47 from 2017This was a book full of important and valuable ideas for artists and makers.It wasn’t always the clearest or most straightforward book to understand. I realize it’s a book about art and culture that’s destined to be on the esoteric side, but a little clarity would’ve probably helped me appreciate it even more.Still, I enjoyed hearing Fujimura’s perspectives on art, culture, creation, environment, and faith and this book gave me the impression that he’d be fascinating to sit down and talk to. He puts caring for culture at a similar level of importance as caring for the environment and physical needs.⭐⭐⭐

  • Kyle
    2019-05-05 14:38

    In Culture Care, Fujimura sets forth a vision for a different kind of cultural engagement for Christians. Instead of winning a culture war, Fujimura suggests that we are agents of culture care, stewards of the culture, and those who make contributions to the culture. Fujimura, an accomplished artist and director of the Brehm Center at Fuller Theological Seminary, particularly focuses on culture care from an artistic perspective, though he has excellent insight and application for non-artists as well. One of the more helpful discussions relates to what Fujimura calls mearcstapas, border stalkers, who dwell on the outskirts of Christian society but are making inroads into the culture. He says that mearcstapa is not a comfortable position, “but mearcstapa can be a role of cultural leadership in a new mode, serving functions including empathy, memory, warning, guidance, mediation, and reconciliation. Those who journey to the borders of their group and beyond will encounter new vistas and knowledge that can enrich the group.” I was so impressed by this book that I will be using it with my BSU leadership team next spring.

  • Andy Bettencourt
    2019-05-07 15:28

    Creative and interesting readMako brings together a lot of knowledge and thought. The result is a guide for artists and Christians (sometimes both....and) on how to interact and create cultures and communities that produce a deeply good work that goes beyond mere utility to touch the soul. In other words, Culture Care is a great idea that can bring meaning to any task and/or person.

  • Jeff
    2019-04-28 19:36

    Creation Care is the idea that humans are God’s stewards over creation. Therefore, as stewards, it is our responsibility to protect and preserve creation. Fujimura’s book “Culture Care” applies the same principal to culture. Rather than argue for culture wars, Fujimura argues that artists must present beauty and grace in a culture that rejects such things (he has an interesting bit about modern art’s rejection of beauty). He doesn’t champion the idea of “Christian artists” but the idea of border crossers: artists who can communicate across cultures.This is not a book I would have picked up on my own. Englewood Review picked it as one of its best books of the year. It also just happened to be available on my digital library app. It was a quick read. At times it was a bit dry, but Fujimura keeps the pace of the book going with stories and references to Mahalia Jackson, Marvin Gaye, Vincent Van Gogh, Emily Dickens, J.R.R. Tolkien, and a few personal anecdotes. My main criticism of the book is the idea of “Culture Care” (TM). It sounds like a bad marketing idea. The phrase used dozens (hundreds?) of times in the book. There are recommendations for starting Culture Care (TM) groups. This kind of marketing always makes me a bit cynical.