Read Out at the Movies: A History of Gay Cinema by Steven Paul Davies Simon Callow Online

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Over the decades, gay cinema has reflected the community's journey from persecution to emancipation to acceptance. Politicized dramas like Victim in the 1960s, The Naked Civil Servant in the 1970s, and the AIDS cinema of the 1980s have given way in recent years to films which celebrate a vast array of gay lifestyles. Gay films have undergone a major shift from the fringe tOver the decades, gay cinema has reflected the community's journey from persecution to emancipation to acceptance. Politicized dramas like Victim in the 1960s, The Naked Civil Servant in the 1970s, and the AIDS cinema of the 1980s have given way in recent years to films which celebrate a vast array of gay lifestyles. Gay films have undergone a major shift from the fringe to the mainstream—2005’s Academy Awards were dubbed "the gay Oscars" with statues going to Brokeback Mountain, Capote, and Transamerica. Producers began clamoring to back gay-themed movies and the most high profile of these is Gus Van Sant’s forthcoming Milk, starring Sean Penn as Harvey Milk, the first prominent American political figure to be elected to office on an openly gay ticket back in the 1970s. The book also covers gay filmmakers and actors and their influence within the industry, the most iconic scenes from gay cinema, and the most memorable dialogue from key films....

Title : Out at the Movies: A History of Gay Cinema
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781842432914
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 208 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Out at the Movies: A History of Gay Cinema Reviews

  • Özlem Güzelharcan
    2019-04-09 06:41

    Güzel bir derleme olmuş. Bir sürü siyah beyaz filmi izleme listeme aldım bile şimdiden. Bazı oyuncular ve yönetmenlerle ilgili de bir sürü bilgi edindim. Yalnız kitap 2008 basımı ve elbette ki 2008'den bu yana lgbt-related milyonlarca film ve dizi çekildi. Yazarın ikinci bir kitap çıkarması farz olmuş gibi.

  • Laura
    2019-03-28 03:32

    I was going to give this book two stars- it's not so much a film studies book as it is a list of well-known LGBT movies interspersed with Davies's (smug, snide) opinions of them- but then I got to his description of Boys Don't Cry:Teena Brandon … a lesbian who transforms herself into a man under the name Brandon Teena, in order to gain acceptance in conservative rural Nebraska.If you're writing what is meant to be a history of LGBT cinema and still can't accurate describe Brandon Teena's gender identitiy (here's a hint: MALE) then you have failed so utterly at your job that I can't really give you anything other than one star.

  • Erik Caswell
    2019-04-15 01:41

    Good as a casual reader wanting to know more about gay film history. I am not exactly a film buff so most of these titles were new to me and it was insightful to be able to see how gay representation has oscillated between a few different tropes over time. We ((being gay men, although many of these same tropes applied to lesbians in film as well - the tormented sole trope in particular)) are either the pathological villain, the flamboyant sissy the audience delights in laughing at, or the tormented character who overdoses and dies or commits suicide. And then there's those few films in there that actually do queer people and representation a service. Someone more heavily invested in queer film - or film in any capacity - probably won't have much use for this text. And someone like me who is only partially invested in film probably won't really want or need to read the text in its entirety. But it's still a worthwhile touch & go read. Also now I know what that movie poster was a guy I was seeing photographed us kissing in front of for a photo project he had so that's a plus. ((It was Pink Narcissus))

  • Gareth Johnstone
    2019-03-25 01:29

    Far too many errors make the book an unreliable source for reference and the author gives his subjective opinion as if it was the consensus of critical opinion, or worse still, as if other opinions have no value. He also includes work created for tv, but does not do so until relatively recently, belying the fact that LGB characters have appeared on television for much longer. His authority to provide a History of Gay Cinema, is therefore compromised.

  • Erastes
    2019-03-28 04:18

    I wouldn’t consider this as a research tool, it’s more like a box of chocolates. Rather than a weighty tome dealing with the subject on a serious level, it’s more a coffee-table decoration and one that lets you pick it up, delve inside and read their view.Sadly, I didn’t find it a “history” rather than a rainbow coloured meander down a yellow brick road. And that is probably its aim–for a book to truly do justice to subject it would need to be about four times the length.Despite a very lengthy foreword by Simon Callow I felt disappointed by this book for several reasons. Many of the films I wouldn’t consider gay at all–but simply “films that have become favourites of gay men.” Films like Mildred Pierce are included, I assume, because Joan Crawford has become such a huge gay icon. But the film itself? Not gay in the absolute slightest. And “The Women” is listed–again, because of the performances and gay icons within and gay men love the film, but neither film is one I would consider to be “gay cinema.”As well as films that were included–and many of which were awarded their “gay oscar ” accolade at theend–there were notable omissions–the main one being “The Celluloid Closet” which baffled me, unless it was consdered to be a rival. I feel it was an important enough film to at least be mentioned.It’s an attractive book, with a beautiful layout, lush with photographs and I can’t fault it in that respect. Each era is nicely handled, and not one era is top heavy. It is certainly informative, I just don’t think that it’s as informative as it should be, given the title.It strikes me like someone’s favourite list, and not a tome for serious study. But it depends what you are coming to this book for, I suppose. If you want a book you can flip through and read snippets about star gossip and what the author thinks gay men take from the “not gay” films–interspersed with actual gay movies, but missing several important films out entirely–then you’ll probably enjoy it. It’s probably suitable for leaving on your coffee table for your friends to leaf through, but if you want a concise book for research on the subject, don’t waste your money.