Read Anti-Man by Dean Koontz Online

anti-man

Sam was an android.His flesh was the ultimate miracle of science, artificially created and completely self-sustaining. And he had the unusual power to heal others. In fact, Sam was too good to live.The world was overpopulated. Medicine had made the decision to stop trying to prolong life. Thus anyone who was not only immune to disease but who healed the dying was dangerousSam was an android.His flesh was the ultimate miracle of science, artificially created and completely self-sustaining. And he had the unusual power to heal others. In fact, Sam was too good to live.The world was overpopulated. Medicine had made the decision to stop trying to prolong life. Thus anyone who was not only immune to disease but who healed the dying was dangerous to the now precarious balance of nature.The order was issued by the Secret Police: "Disassemble Sam and destroy all records of his existence."But one man couldn't bear to see the work of a lifetime destroyed. He kidnapped Sam and began to run.Now they were enemies of the State -- hunted like animals, hurtling toward the terrifying secret of existence itself!...

Title : Anti-Man
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 3335845
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 142 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Anti-Man Reviews

  • Sophie
    2019-03-27 02:46

    One full star deducted for page 98 alone.Our main characters completely plot-irrelevant thoughts about a completely plot-irrelevant waitress:"All in all, it was a delightful meal, and I managed not to think about anything but the taste of the food - and whether or not the young blonde's blouse-bulging attributes were real or silicone-induced. I had no compunction against marrying a girl with chemically-created allurements, so long as they were indistinguishable from the real thing. As far as i could tell, these were. I played a game with myself, trying to decide whether or not I should ask her to marry me. I listed what i could see of her faults and virtues. In the end, I decided to come back in a day or two and look the merchandise over again."Really necessary, young Koontz, really ?!

  • Ralph Carlson
    2019-04-10 23:35

    Koontz's fourth novel. Of the four I have enjoyed this one the best. While neither of them have been great reads, they have all been highly entertaining. I believe them to be great starts to his eventual career, and don't distract from a listing of his works.

  • Xiamera
    2019-04-06 03:47

    I felt a sense of disquiet when I first started reading and the android was referred to as simply Him. It was a little too close to paralleling how Christians refer to God when speaking about him. (view spoiler)[ It was actually a bit funny when later down in the story that the android referred to himself as a god. I liked that he made a course correction though and explained that he drew that comparison so that Jacob could better understand what he was trying to say. I also just realised that Jacob is another biblical name.(hide spoiler)] I paid it no mind and continued to read. As I was reading, I wasn't quite drawn into the story and I started and stopped quite frequently. It was such a short read but kind of difficult to get through. The ending felt anti-climactic and the whole thing felt like a waste of time. It pains me to give it one star but I just didn't connect to the story and it wasn't even a fun diversion.

  • Robert Beveridge
    2019-04-09 23:39

    Dean Koontz, Anti-Man (Ace, 1970)[originally posted 17Sep2001]Koontz' earlier work is inconsistent, and you're often taking a crapshoot when picking up one of his pre-horror novels. Anti-Man is one of the better ones, from the perspective of writing style—it flows much more smoothly than many of his earlier works, without the repetition and one-sentence paragraphs that mar the early short stories and novels. The plot's a doozy, too—a scientist has kidnapped, and is hiding, an android who's capable of healing the sick and raising the dead, who's supposed to be dismantled on sight by order of the government (when the world's overpopulated, after all, why would you WANT to heal the sick and raise the dead?). While the questions discussed and the answers revealed are very much the stuff of well-tread science-fictive paths, the treading is above average, leading almost to glimpses of Koontz' later brilliance. ***

  • Alanseinfeld
    2019-03-30 01:27

    An interesting book. The themes of Frankenstein and Jekyll and Hyde, as referenced to within the book are brought into the future in a very fluid style. The metamorphosis of Him and his android selves pre-dates Terminator style technology! The idea of Him being God holds the interest for a while. Not brilliant but a good introduction, for me, as I have never read anything by Koontz. Would recommend.

  • Mary
    2019-03-20 23:30

    Early Koontz book-science fiction type with good vs. evil theme. Good descriptions of Alaskan wilderness and futuristic society and NYC. Enjoyed the book but gave it a lower rating than I usually do for Koontz because it was an early book before he wrote as well as now and characters not as strong.

  • Rogue
    2019-04-09 03:42

    One small detail. The android is not called Sam, it's called Him. Sam was the name of the humanoid in the previous book Fear That Man. Someone's getting a bit muddled. Jacob considered giving the android a name, but never did, other than Him.

  • Tumchenmamentumlein
    2019-04-01 05:31

    Fantascienza allo stato puro. L'androide e il suo creatore fuggono dal Governo in modo che "Lui" (l'androide, cosi' chiamato dal medico) possa evolversi rapidamente e salvare vite umane. Nel corso della loro fuga l'anti uomo si muta sempre più velocemente e devono stare in agguato.

  • Nicholas
    2019-04-20 07:23

    Decent story idea, decent writing. But it could have easily been edited down to about 75% of the length without losing anything. Still, one of the better things I've read from the author.

  • Takedown
    2019-04-06 02:43

    Very good.

  • Brandon Fryman
    2019-03-31 01:30

    you can see themes in his early work that he incorporates into his later works.