Read Breathing into Marble by Laura Sintija Černiauskaitė Marija Marcinkute Online

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When Isabel decides to adopt the troubled young orphan, Ilya, she has no idea of the trauma that is about to be unleashed upon her family. Taking him back home to their cottage in the country, his dark presence unsettles the family and resurrects the ghosts of Isabel’s past.Breathing into Marble is a dark and poetic story of love, family, deception and death.It won the 200When Isabel decides to adopt the troubled young orphan, Ilya, she has no idea of the trauma that is about to be unleashed upon her family. Taking him back home to their cottage in the country, his dark presence unsettles the family and resurrects the ghosts of Isabel’s past.Breathing into Marble is a dark and poetic story of love, family, deception and death.It won the 2009 EU Prize for Literature...

Title : Breathing into Marble
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780995560000
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 192 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Breathing into Marble Reviews

  • Jackie (Farm Lane Books)
    2019-02-19 08:22

    Breathing Into Marble is probably the first Lithuanian book to be translated into English, and it is for this reason that I agreed to accept a review copy from its publishers, Noir Press.The book follows Isabel as she adopts Ilya, a boy with a troubled past. The way he disrupts life in his new family is beautifully described, skillfully showing how trauma from past events affects people as they try to proceed with their lives.The problem was that I was too aware of the writing. Brilliant prose flows so well that you barely notice it, but the writing in this book was strangely jarring. There was an overuse of metaphor that often made me cringe, in what would otherwise be a great paragraph:The sky above the woods shone like a pearl, a reproach to the heavy darkness of the earth. The painfully empty space attracted her. At night, half sleeping in bed, as heavy as a bag of gravel, her body would grow lighter and soon Isabel would feel that if she just rid herself of one last small stone she would rise up into the air.In copying out the above passage I realised that it was quite beautiful in isolation. The problem was that there were so many metaphors throughout the book that I quickly became irritated by them.I also found reading the book to be hard work. So much of what happens isn't described explicitly - the reader has to deduce it by reading between the lines. This meant I sometimes missed important events and, confused, had to back-track to see where I had failed to spot the action.The above criticism makes it sound as though I didn't enjoy the book, but this isn't strictly true - I appreciated its literary quality, and the emotion of individual scenes, but found it wasn't compelling as a whole. I'm pleased I read it - particularly as it's the first Lithuanian book I've tried, but I prefer reading to be less hard work.If you enjoy literary fiction that works the mind, then you'll find a lot to like in this book. It is beautifully observed and captures many profound moments in the relationship between family members.

  • K's Bognoter
    2019-03-03 05:11

    Litauisk, psykologisk gyser og familiedrama har stærke elementer og evner at berøre undervejs. Romanen taber imidlertid på et lidt for anstrengt og selvbevidst forsøg på at skrive finlitterært.Læs hele anmeldelsen på K’s bognoter: http://bognoter.dk/2017/12/21/laura-s...

  • Virginie
    2019-03-09 10:13

    Reading the world in books: Lithuania.

  • Dane Cobain
    2019-03-07 08:10

    Disclaimer: While I aim to be unbiased, I received a copy of this for free to review.This book is different to almost anything else you’re likely to find. It’s a beautifully told piece of literary fiction that features a twist on the “boy meets girl” tale by subverting it into a “boy meets mum” story about an adopted kid with some mental health issues.Translated into English from Lithuanian, the language in which the original piece was a bestseller, it’s almost like a modern day revival of Hemingway and Graham Greene, or even Burroughs or Kerouac.Just as it is, it’s a very good book. But it’s made more impressive by the way that it translates so easily – the story itself could take place almost anywhere, and that alone makes it relatable. That’s boosted by the beauty of the language and the little thoughts that Laura’s characters have. It’s full of little observations that leave you nodding your head and smiling, and it’s also entertaining.

  • World Literature Today
    2019-03-10 11:22

    "This work richly deserves the EU Prize for Literature, which it won. It’s a slim, memorable slice of suprareality wrapped in a family tale, at times something to marvel at, at times closer than your life vein." - Andrew SingerThis book was reviewed in the May 2017 issue of World Literature Today magazine. Read the full review by visiting our website: https://www.worldliteraturetoday.org/...