Read Slapstick, Volume 1 by Reilly Brown Fred Van Lente Diego Olortegui Online

slapstick-volume-1

Steve Harmon was an average teenager who had an average job as your average clown, living in average New Jersey. But after being zapped by weird and mysterious extradimensional energy, Steve became Slapstick - a living, breathing cartoon character! Now, after joining - and then quitting - Deadpool's Mercs for Money, Slapstick is striking out on his own terms! Sure, he's goSteve Harmon was an average teenager who had an average job as your average clown, living in average New Jersey. But after being zapped by weird and mysterious extradimensional energy, Steve became Slapstick - a living, breathing cartoon character! Now, after joining - and then quitting - Deadpool's Mercs for Money, Slapstick is striking out on his own terms! Sure, he's gotta move back in with his parents, but these new business ventures take time. And anyway, he gets to team up with the Amazing Spider-Man - so things must be going pretty well, right?Collecting: Slapstick 1-5...

Title : Slapstick, Volume 1
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781302903350
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 112 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Slapstick, Volume 1 Reviews

  • Paul
    2018-09-11 15:02

    I may be loopy from pain medication (I pretty much always am) but I thought this was hilarious. It also managed to reference virtually every kids' cartoon and toy range since the 1960s. OK, this might not have been the most cerebral comicbook I've ever read but I had an absolute blast reading it... It probably wins the award for 'Most Dirty Jokes in Any Marvel Comic Ever', too.

  • Shadowdenizen
    2018-08-30 10:44

    Reading single issues. (Note that, as of this writing only the first 4 issues are out yet.)And I'm surprised at how much I'm enjoying this title. (Though to be fair, I do have a penchant for both B-list characters and titles with a slight goofiness to them!)I realize this title isn't for everyone, but if you liked SquirrelGirl, Great Lakes Avengers, Howard the Duck, or Damage Control (amongst others) give this title a try.

  • Kit
    2018-09-11 08:58

    Listen, kids. Kit's got a story to tell.The year: 1996. The place? Sunny Southern California. Kit is nine years old, turning ten during that blazing summer. Her neighbor invites her over to sneak into her big brother's room. Going through shoeboxes full of comics, Kit's life has changed. It changes further when said Big Brother comes home, gives a performative teenage fit about his stuff, and then starts lending small stacks of comics to Kit for pocket change. In that stack is the first book of a limited run series called "The Awesome Slapstick." ( http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php... ) Along with Lobo, Wolverine, the Mask, and the Freakazoid cartoon series, Kit has found a special place where being the weird one is fun, wild, heroic, violent, and, just like the brother, who later ends up behind bars, not always good for you. But for a kid from a conservative household who is part of a church that bans Disney for supporting gay people, yeah, for awhile, it's enough to have something special to hide away that is part of that harmless mini-rebellion of being a kid, and she jumps in with both feet. Years later, Kit is dating a man. A wonderful, gentle, thoughtful young man who helped her smuggle her precious books and childhood things out of the house where her mother, having another episode, demands her room be stripped of every book and cartoon character and "start growing up." They use the time her mother's brother is visiting from out of state to move out of the house while she isn't there to ask where she is moving. He picks up a few boxes at a time in his trunk. He doesn't have a job yet, but spends his time going between thrift stores finding old video games to sell online for a little cash. He uses some of that cash to help her find a four issue limited series called "The Amazing Slapstick," something she vaguely remembered from her childhood. She rereads it in his car on the way to his house, feet up on the passenger seat turning pages, and he smiles as he drives. A decade later, she's just turned 31, far too old to be reading comics still, by the estimation of some, but the world has gotten kinder to the idea of being yourself. For her 31st birthday, her friend and roommate, Kayleigh, hands her a book she knows she will love, because months before, when discussing childhood memories of comics late into the night, Kit has spoken with starry eyes about a 4-issue limited series she loved as a kid. One with cartoon powers and tons of jokes. "If I could have any power," she said animatedly, "I'd want cartoon ones. I'd like to be able to make people laugh whenever I wanted and know I could do anything I imagined. Everyone wants to be invisible or fly or be really strong, but I'd want it all as long as it didn't have to be serious. That's why I love The Mask so much. It's also the first CD I ever owned, the soundtrack. He never has to be afraid if he can make people laugh..." She yammers on as usual as Kayleigh smiles, suggests they watch the movie. They make popcorn on the stove and sit together on the couch in their pjs. Kit refuses to stop singing along with "Cuban Pete.""I thought you'd like it if I got you the new one," she says with her usual, practiced shrug of humility, not one to be too sentimental. But Kit can't see it too well through the tears in her eyes. ********************************************************So how was the book? Isn't this a review? I couldn't tell you how you'd feel, but I can tell you how it made me feel. I loved the feeling I got in reading it that things don't have to be serious to be worth my time. I loved knowing that I don't give a solitary damn about whether or not this is going to get an Eisner. I even had to suppress a sneer at the knowledge that I don't feel obligated to justify why something is enjoyable to me to a cabal of humorless taste-makers in order for me to want to set aside time to read it. I'm not going to suggest everyone run out and read it, or that it has never been done, or that it is even the best at what it has done. I just know it made me happy to see it again. And yes, I cried even as I laughed, giant rainbow robot blanket wrapped all around me and eating pixie stix on my front porch in my cartoon pjs, because it was a reminder for me that no matter what, some things will never change. And one of those is how I will always laugh at anyone using the word "dingus."And that's my Goodreads Goal, folks.

  • Ma'Belle
    2018-09-16 10:38

    Slapstick: That's Not Funny (No really, it's not.)The only reason I ordered this to my hold shelf at the library was a goodreads review that stirred the same nostalgia in me that it did in that reader's heart and mind. I remember picking up Slapstick #1 at my neighborhood grocery store in 1992 (In my city, that's where we went for a limited selection of comics and Marvel collectors trading cards.). I can picture some of the art, but I don't remember anything about the story, and I'm pretty sure I only had one part of that limited series (which apparently was voted Best New Comic by Marvel readers that year?) so it wasn't much of a story.The original Slapstick was a thing of its time - the same time period that Animaniacs and The Mask and several other Jim Carrey moves came out and were much-quoted and imitated by adolescents and high schoolers in the U.S. Having recently re-watched the first few seasons of Animaniacs on Netflix, I know that series was far ahead of its time and still stands the test of time. Read this hilarious look back in time at an imagined pitch meeting at Warner Brothers for Animaniacs! It introduced a new generation to the Marx Brothers' comedic style, combining political savvy with slapstick, and even gave us insight into films of the time that our parents were probably more familiar with.On the other hand, I'd wager that rewatching The Mask, Ace Ventura, or Dumb and Dumber would be rather painful experiences at this point in my life.Slapstick: That's Not Funny is just a lot of dick jokes and references to popular cartoons, toys, and cartoons derived from toys from the second half of the '80s into the early '90s. It's not the *worst* comic book I've read - after all, I was able to get through every panel of all 6 issues collected - but it's not one I would recommend to anyone. I would not even recommend it to the presumed target demographic of teenage boys fueled by sugar and a new influx of sex hormones, because we can do better, and they really don't need more of this garbage.my review is at https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3...

  • Ma'Belle
    2018-09-09 09:49

    Slapstick: That's Not Funny (No really, it's not.)The only reason I ordered this to my hold shelf at the library was a goodreads review that stirred the same nostalgia in me that it did in that reader's heart and mind. I remember picking up Slapstick #1 at my neighborhood grocery store in 1992 (In my city, that's where we went for a limited selection of comics and Marvel collectors trading cards.). I can picture some of the art, but I don't remember anything about the story, and I'm pretty sure I only had one part of that limited series (which apparently was voted Best New Comic by Marvel readers that year?) so it wasn't much of a story.The original Slapstick was a thing of its time - the same time period that Animaniacs and The Mask and several other Jim Carrey moves came out and were much-quoted and imitated by adolescents and high schoolers in the U.S. Having recently re-watched the first few seasons of Animaniacs on Netflix, I know that series was far ahead of its time and still stands the test of time. Read this hilarious look back in time at an imagined pitch meeting at Warner Brothers for Animaniacs! It introduced a new generation to the Marx Brothers' comedic style, combining political savvy with slapstick, and even gave us insight into films of the time that our parents were probably more familiar with.On the other hand, I'd wager that rewatching The Mask, Ace Ventura, or Dumb and Dumber would be rather painful experiences at this point in my life.Slapstick: That's Not Funny is just a lot of dick jokes and references to popular cartoons, toys, and cartoons derived from toys from the second half of the '80s into the early '90s. It's not the *worst* comic book I've read - after all, I was able to get through every panel of all 6 issues collected - but it's not one I would recommend to anyone. I would not even recommend it to the presumed target demographic of teenage boys fueled by sugar and a new influx of sex hormones, because we can do better, and they really don't need more of this garbage.

  • Michael Alonso
    2018-09-05 07:50

    "That's not funny" sums ups my experience pretty well.Marvel "Infinite Comics" are not my favorite to start with, but I expected Slapstick to be, worst case scenario, a rip-off of Dark Horse Comics' The Mask, but if failed at being a "toon" in most ways.Slapstick won't move a muscle unless he's getting payed and is obsessed with getting his "wangdoodle" back, to the point of hiring a villain who he betrays instantly when confronted by the good guys.Slapstick spends most of the comic fighting... pop-culture parodies and it feels like the people behind this know more about popular cartoon than "classic toons", he fights a He-Man parody, My Little Pony centaurs and meets G.I.Joe dog people.The minimum I expected of Slapstick was for him to be able to take a beating, but most of the people he meets know his weak point, the best I got was Slapstick getting an imprint of a fist on his face, speaking of which, you'd think he'd pull more funny faces, but we don't really get much in that department either.His cartoon powers seem to limited to invulnerability, except he's not, a mallet called Gertie, which is kinda tiny, "magic pockets", from which he just pull pop-culture references and a grenade or two. It looks like he can change costumes, but only uses this power to dress up for women he wants to impress.I'll end this with a minor spoiler that proves they don't seem to know what to do with a toon. The big baddie is defeated by an anvil, but they don't show it because the baddie wasn't a toon at that moment. Like I said before they fail at toon faces and instead of having a flat head, pained expression and stars flying around, it's just a panel with the anvil falling and the next panel has the anvil on the floor... that's it... that's...not funny?

  • Socialite
    2018-09-10 10:45

    I honestly thought this was a rather funny comic. I picked it up from the library on an impulse and would recommend it to others. It uses slapstick's cartoony look, along with other cartoon parodies of predominantly 80's cartoons, as a contrast to the rest of the art in the book. The art is where it's most interesting but it some humorous discussion on the challenges of being a cartoon character. It's short, sweet and extremely fun and the main thing is I had fun which is what I expected :)

  • Cody Contway
    2018-09-18 13:59

    I read the first issue only and not the entire book. I found myself not really caring for the protagonist and don't really care for this style of humor, which is why I really didn't care for it. I would suggest picking up a single issue and seeing if it is something you enjoy. I do like the art and the cover art is very nice.It tries to be like Rodger Rabbit where you have a more real-world setting and then you have silly cartoon characters in it, but it didn't work for me.

  • Daniel Butcher
    2018-09-11 08:53

    In the end there is some interesting pop culture satire here that pays off. The issue is the story is uneven and it really takes time to get us to the over side where Van Lente's style can kick in full force.

  • Josh Newhouse
    2018-09-19 11:36

    One strange book and not for kids.