Read The Raiders: Being Some Passages in the Life of John Faa, Lord and Earl of Little Egypt by S.R. Crockett Online

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Caught up in the strife between smugglers on the Solway Coast and the gypsies of Galloway, young Patrick Heron is flung into a society of social outcasts, outlaws and downright murderers. But this world of moonlit confusion and bloody horror offers a kind of freedom, too, as Patrick travels far beyond the conventions of his day to enter a world made anew by fear and desolaCaught up in the strife between smugglers on the Solway Coast and the gypsies of Galloway, young Patrick Heron is flung into a society of social outcasts, outlaws and downright murderers. But this world of moonlit confusion and bloody horror offers a kind of freedom, too, as Patrick travels far beyond the conventions of his day to enter a world made anew by fear and desolation and courage and energy. Crockett's raciest narrative is full of the wild Galloway landscape which he knew so well and loved so much, informed at every turn of the plot by his delight in local history and old folk tales of the region....

Title : The Raiders: Being Some Passages in the Life of John Faa, Lord and Earl of Little Egypt
Author :
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ISBN : 9781841952345
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 352 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Raiders: Being Some Passages in the Life of John Faa, Lord and Earl of Little Egypt Reviews

  • Hannah
    2019-04-08 07:30

    The long time I took to read this book doesn't mean I wasn't enjoying it. This is a book to savor, not to hurry though when there's no time to read and you're actually doing something else also at the same time. Not the book to keep one eye open over while attempting to use it as relaxation material to go to sleep with. Not the book to curl up with on a rainy night with growls of thunder, as there are some spooky bits.It's character-driven, while the plot meanders a bit. Actually, the raiders are larger-than-life bugaboos that probably never existed, but it's an interesting look at the Scotch culture in the early 1700s. There is a nod to the legend of the demon dogs, which is explained later in the book but is plenty spooky in a couple spots. The narrator, Patrick Heron, laird of the island Rathan, is sometimes dense and sometimes sharp, sometimes gifted with a truly tongue-in-cheek dry wit and humor (see some of my status updates for a couple quotes.) He spars with the fair May Mischief and has for a friend the silent and inexplicable Silver Sand, an aging man who is often a loner but is always at his side in a pinch, along with the trusty canine Quharrie, a huge dog.Though the plot has some odd pacing issues, truly each character springs off the page, larger than life. Patrick learns to be a man in the course of the story and learns to value those things that matter most.Also, a man's testimony is given near the end: he was once one of the evil raiders, yet his whole life is changed by converting, meeting Jesus—comparing himself to Saul of Tarsus. Just another example of another excellent Crockett tale!