Read The Magic Years: Understanding & Handling the Problems of Early Childhood by Selma H. Fraiberg T. Berry Brazelton Online

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To a small child, the world is an exciting but sometimes frightening and unstable place. In The Magic Years, Selma Fraiberg takes the reader into the mind of the child, showing how he confronts the world and learns to cope with it. With great warmth and perception, she discusses the problems at each stage of development and reveals the qualities—above all, the quality of uTo a small child, the world is an exciting but sometimes frightening and unstable place. In The Magic Years, Selma Fraiberg takes the reader into the mind of the child, showing how he confronts the world and learns to cope with it. With great warmth and perception, she discusses the problems at each stage of development and reveals the qualities—above all, the quality of understanding—that can provide the right answer at critical moments.To a small child, the world is an exciting but sometimes frightening and unstable place. In The Magic Years, Selma Fraiberg takes the reader into the mind of the child, showing how he confronts the world and learns to cope with it. With great warmth and perception, she discusses the problems at each stage of development and reveals the qualities—above all, the quality of understanding—that can provide the right answer at critical moments....

Title : The Magic Years: Understanding & Handling the Problems of Early Childhood
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780684825502
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 320 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Magic Years: Understanding & Handling the Problems of Early Childhood Reviews

  • George
    2019-04-04 03:56

    A magnificent book!!! I finished "The Magic Years" several months ago for the second time. It was a required “text” in a course that I took at Manhattan College, many years ago. It’s message is just as fresh and enlightening now as I remember it being then!To a small child, the world is an exciting but sometimes frightening and unstable place. The point of this book, Selma Fraiberg says, is that “A method of child-rearing is not – or should not be – a whim, a fashion or a shibboleth. It should derive from an understanding of the developing child, of his physical and mental equipment at any given stage and, therefore, his readiness at any given stage to adapt, to learn, to regulate his behavior according to parental expectations.”The primary subject matter of the book is divided into three parts – the first eighteen months, eighteen months to three years, and three years to six. The author takes the reader into the mind of the child, showing how he/she confronts this world and learns to cope with it. She discusses the problems at each stage of development and reveals the qualities – above all, the quality of understanding – that can provide the right answers at critical moments. In describing, how children mature from birth to six years old, she discusses theories and facts about feeding, talking, sex education, fantasy, self-control, fear, and other subjects in practical terms of daily living. One of the most interesting parts of the book was the section, in Chapter 5, on the building of a conscience.Her style is literate and graceful. I think that The Magic Years should be required reading (a classic, still in print after more than 50 years since it was first published) for all social scientists and parents-to-be. I’ve given it as a Christmas gift to several such couples this past year.

  • Claudia Vieira
    2019-04-12 09:04

    I read this book again now that I am a grandparent after first reading it about 28 years ago when I was a pre-school teacher. I greatly enjoyed it and find that so many of Fraiberg's examples still ring true and her good sense approach is still very refreshing and valuable. But it is very dated in it's psychoanalytical perspective and it's language about sexual identity. I felt that her discussion of the challenges that boys face was still quite relevant, while her discussion of girls sexual identification made me cringe. In the first two pages of the section "on being a girl", I count 20 uses of the words "feminine" and "femininity". At any rate, I'm passing it on to my son who is now a Papa of a baby girl and I trust he will be able to translate for his modern day sensibilities.

  • Bethany
    2019-04-09 04:15

    I thought this book was very helpful. The only thing that really bothered me was the first sentence of the introduction to the 50th Anniversary edition in which T. Berry Brazelton said that The Magic Years had been around for a half decade. Oops.

  • Meg
    2019-04-18 08:13

    One of my favorite books on early childhood. Not really a "how to" about handling problems so much as a philosophy and understanding of childhood development. A classic! First read in my child psych training.

  • Yassin Salama
    2019-04-19 07:19

    The best passages to understand your childhood years.This is the best book I have ever read about chikdren psychology indeed. I advise every father and mother to read it, and for those who wants to be parents also.

  • Sandra de koning-vd pol
    2019-04-01 06:58

    Altijd fijn, een handleiding om je te kunnen inleven in de belevingswereld van je kind ;-))

  • Dgratner
    2019-04-14 11:15

    Crucial reading to understand children and the adults they become. I finished it a long time ago now, but the ideas open your eyes to what being a child is like better than anything besides memory.

  • Erik Graff
    2019-04-09 08:21

    I read this book for the Human Growth and Development class at Union Theological Seminary. At that time children were very distant from me, particularly the very small ones. I'd been away in school for seven years, living on campuses, and had virtually no contact with them. The idea of having a child myself was never considered nor do I recall any fellow students ever discussing the matter except for the married couple who lived next door my freshman year.Since that time, since leaving academics I've had occasion to meet many more children. Indeed, I've not only dated a woman with a toddler (now, sadly, deceased at the age of nineteen), but recently had the fortune of being included in the family of an old neighborhood friend who married a fellow with three adolescents and promptly got pregnant herself. They live a block away and the latest addition to their family, Jack, is one of my best friends, someone I see and interact with (play with) almost daily. He's now approaching three.Fraiberg's book is to be recommended for prospective and new parents. I'm not sure it's a good choice for developmental psychology courses, however, unless the class is made up of persons planning to have children or of students actually working with children as, say, in preschool internships. For me, at the time, its portrayal of the inner world of childhood was simply too abstract and, frankly, irrelevant.

  • David
    2019-04-15 09:56

    I started reading What's Going On in There? How the Brain and Mind Develop in the First Five Years of Life, but it was waaaaay too dense for the time I had to devote to it. And too long.So I picked this up on the advice from... someone, and it was actually a wonderful read. It sits somewhere between academic analysis (a la the Eliot book) and psychotherapy manual. But the way the insight is presented, even when as anecdotes about patients, is digestible and useful in a relatable, non-clinical way (the bit about a toddler's mind being like a corrupt court was a particularly handy analogy).There's a bit of belaboring at times, much like with sleep training books, but it's a much more useful vehicle for this kind of instruction (study->lesson->mantra), so it didn't feel repetitive.

  • Nancy Frishberg
    2019-04-22 08:16

    This book was an eye-opener 25 years ago when my child was young, despite my having read a bunch in child development. I remember it strongly, and it helped explain and handle interesting issues related to toilet training, falling asleep fears, and imaginary friends, among others. Fraiberg writes with authority and compassion: she likes kids, and writes for parents and families in a readable voice. The "magic" is about how children interpret the world - amazing things happen, and as they grow in capabilities, they demonstrate increasing control over their world, and show how they believe themselves in control (perhaps beyond what adults would claim). In fact I like this book so much I'm buying copies for a half dozen families with new babies. I hope they like it half as much as me :) (And I'm about to reread it to inform my observations of the grandchild, physically nearest to me.)

  • unperspicacious
    2019-04-09 10:21

    Overly pedantic. Maybe it was a landmark work in 1959, but other writers have been able to express the same ideas and observations in much more accessible ways.--- Revised on 20 May 2012 from 1 to 3-stars. The writing unfortunately distracts from what are some very powerful stories and metaphors, which, IMO, are exactly what active new parents really need (rather than being told in academese what is supposedly going in your kid's skull). There is a priceless description of the young baby/toddler as scientist. Suddenly a lot of my son's less obvious behaviour began to make more plausible sense from his point of view. It is not often stated as such, and certainly not at such a young age. Somewhat these mental images stuck afterwards without any prompting, which redeems what I thought was a pretentious book to begin with. When there is more time, I might go back and finish this.

  • Angela
    2019-04-23 10:20

    This book was given to me by my mother-in-law and I completely wrote it off because it was published in 1959. I assumed it would be full of outdated information and ideas, but I could not have been more wrong. Throughout the book I was astonished at descriptions of parenting dilemmas that I assumed to be too modern to have been considered in 1959, particularly issues around discipline and exposure to TV/media. The only area where this book's age really showed was around gender issues. I highly recommend it to anyone seeking to better understand the mental and emotional development of children up to 6 years.

  • Gail
    2019-03-31 03:24

    This is a great book! I would have thought it would be terribly out of date since it is an older book, but most of it still holds true today and fits with what I have learned in child development and child psych classes recently. The great part about it is the easy to digest format and the way it conveys the "magic" of these early years. It is easy to forget how much children really have to learn in the beginning. It really makes you appreciate the learning process and some of their early milestones much more.

  • Myfanwy
    2019-04-17 08:17

    My friend Ellen gave me this book and I am so grateful for it. Every time I'm feeling anxious about my child's development or how I am doing in my parenting, I refer to this gem of a book. Told with compassion and insight, this book helps new parents understand what is going on in those developing minds as they wander through their child's first years. As my child goes, I will continue to reread this book.

  • Sarah Gordon
    2019-04-23 08:24

    A wonderful exploration of the early years of a baby/child's development. The author describes the child as a magician in the way s/he encounters the world, and offers ways to address problems by considering the perspective of the child, which is magical rather than rational. An enjoyable read that offered new ways to understand both my 3-month-old and my 4-year-old, who sadly is nearing the end of that magical time.

  • Michelle
    2019-04-10 07:00

    I re-read this book this book this past summer and it has so much more meaning and application for me (now that I'm a parent myself). The writing style is somewhat academic (it was a required read for a Human Development course I took 12 years ago), but the knowledge is truly invaluable! I'm a better parent for having re-read this book.

  • Sarah
    2019-03-26 07:59

    I wish I'd read this before E was born. I struggle more with the toddler phase than I did with the infant phase, and have been reading more books now. This one covers from infancy, so I was looking at parts in retrograde. I found a lot valuable. There were a couple of things I found dated or didn't agree with, but I can't remember them now.

  • Sandra
    2019-03-26 02:55

    I read this early childhood book when our first-born was a wee soft one. In a sort of Erma Bombeck style, with many illustory anecdotes, Ms. Fraiberg imparts a wealth of information to help one understand what goes on in a child's head from infancy to about school age. Very helpful to first time parents, this book is a favorite to give as a baby shower gift, along with "Good Night, Moon"!

  • Rachel
    2019-03-26 11:21

    Out of many childhood psychology books that I've read, I found this very insightful and helpful. Very relevant to the 2 1/2 year-old in my life right now! I look forward to reading the later sections in the coming months.

  • Diane
    2019-04-22 04:06

    I appreciated the very scientific/clinical approach of this book. It's full of many wonderful examples & explanations as to what's really going on inside your child's head during certain stages of their life as well as how to handle each situation in a way thats not above them. Very handy reading.

  • pjr8888
    2019-04-15 09:01

    i read this for my dev psych class, should be mandatory for people who are making babies. you need a licencese to get married, you need a licence to drive a car, you need a licence to cut hair.... but any idiot can have a child without the least knowledge on how to care for and raise him.

  • Derrith
    2019-04-09 10:25

    Despite the fact that it was written 40 years ago, Magic Years feels pretty contemporary, and offers good insight into the cognitive and emotional development of young children. And Frailberg is a much better writer than Dr. Spock. :-)

  • Michelle
    2019-03-30 09:06

    wonderful book on child development. amazing to learn what's happening in those little heads during these first crucial years. makes you realize that there are no tricks to parenting, only listening, common sense and lots of loving.

  • Bojana Duke
    2019-04-04 10:56

    Fun writing style and very insightful. Only wish the ideas would have been organized a bit more with sections to break things up. As it stands it's very hard to use as a reference for specific issues.

  • Madeleine
    2019-04-13 03:59

    "De magische wereld van het kind" Daar heb je nog eens wat aan en.... leuk lezen bovendien.

  • Nancy Davenport
    2019-04-14 09:17

    Started me on the way to becoming a therapist

  • Dionne
    2019-03-26 09:00

    I am trying to learn what is going on in my kid's head, why is she so whiny and full of hot emotion all of the sudden?? I am hoping to be more patient with some insight.

  • Angie
    2019-04-25 10:14

    I liked her advice. The format is dense, but interesting enough with anecdotes sprinkled through. A bit dated of course, but majority is still relevant and helpful. Worth the read.

  • Tara
    2019-04-12 05:25

    I won't read all of this. I've gotten some useful information out of this book but we're past the point with much of it.

  • Sandra
    2019-04-10 03:05

    The primary book I relied on to raise 2 kids.