Read The Day We Almost Bombed Moscow: The Allied War In Russia, 1918 1920 by Christopher Dobson John Miller Online

the-day-we-almost-bombed-moscow-the-allied-war-in-russia-1918-1920

An undercover RAF squadron prepares to bomb Moscow from a makeshift landing ground in the Steppes two hundred miles from the Russian capital ...Two British regiments land at Vladivostok ... The Japanese invade Siberia with 70,000 troops ... American infantrymen fight the Bolsheviks in a bitter winter war south of Archangel ... British spies in Moscow plot the overthrow ofAn undercover RAF squadron prepares to bomb Moscow from a makeshift landing ground in the Steppes two hundred miles from the Russian capital ...Two British regiments land at Vladivostok ... The Japanese invade Siberia with 70,000 troops ... American infantrymen fight the Bolsheviks in a bitter winter war south of Archangel ... British spies in Moscow plot the overthrow of the Russian government ... Thriller fiction? No. These events actually happened in a little known and much misunderstood war conducted at the beginning of the 20th century. The Allied intervention began in 1918 as a desperate attempt to maintain the Eastern Front against the Germans after Russia's decision to withdraw from the Great War. But by 1920 it had developed into a haphazard and often chaotic offensive against Bolshevism itself and set the pattern for East-West relations which persists with all its dangers today - long after British troops landed at Murmansk to protect the Soviet government of the town from the Germans and invading White Finns....

Title : The Day We Almost Bombed Moscow: The Allied War In Russia, 1918 1920
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780340337233
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 288 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Day We Almost Bombed Moscow: The Allied War In Russia, 1918 1920 Reviews

  • Jan-Maat
    2019-04-17 07:59

    A book written by a couple of journalists after a chance chat with an old man on a golf course who insisted on telling them about the day he almost bombed Moscow. I can't say I have had a similar conversation, but then I only play crazy golf. Anyhow, after a couple of gin and tonics, their journalistic instincts begin to crank into life, the result of which is this book. As a result it is a readable popular history of the allied intervention in Russia during the civil war after the slow collapse of the Government in 1917, but is a mixed bag. They look at the intervention largely from a British perspective. French assistance in the war in Poland is not included and Japan's involvement in the Russian far east only briefly mentioned. Britain's role in the Ukraine and Archangel area is best served with some attention given to Baku, Central Asia and the Baltic republics (where the Soviet advance was stopped by blocking the railway lines). There are lonely chapter about Sidney Reilly who was a British spy active in Moscow for a while during the civil war and the adventures of the Czech Legion. The Czech Legion had been formed from prisoners of war prepared to fight for the allies against the Central Powers during WWI. When the Soviet Union left WWI the Czechs agreed to be shipped from Vladivostok, round the world, to serve on the Western Front. However the best laid plans of mice and men so oft go awry and changing circumstances within Russia after the 1917 and the fact that the Czechs were well armed led to them controlling a good portion of the Trans-Siberian railway for several years until eventually over 60,000 of them and their dependants were evacuated from Vladivostok in 1920. The British intervention was most directly active in the far North around Archangel where units of anti-Bolshevik troops were recruited and equipped by Britain, but the soldiers happened to have a keen sense of the political realities of the situation and so tended to desert. Down in Southern Russia British intervention was limited to supporting the efforts of the White generals. The promised raid on Moscow with biplanes flying at the limits of their range, as suggested by the book's title, was aborted. Not much attempt to draw out the broader themes or to reach overall conclusions, just an introduction to some of the odder events that took place on the fringes of the Russian revolution and Civil War (the oddest of course was the Emir of Bukhara's use of his dancing boys left behind one by one to delay the pursuit of the Red Army as he fled across Central Asia, but that has nothing to do with this book). Naturally since this is a conflict largely forgotten among the countries that intervened in the Russian civil war I found my copy in one of the bookshops that only sell sharply discounted remainders that would otherwise be pulped.