Read The Dagger Affair by David McDaniel Online

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"Tell us all about Dagger!"That was the command thrown at Napoleon Solo and Illya Kuryakin by the unseen THRUSH agents who kidnapped and interrogated them with lie detectors. And from each U.N.C.L.E. agent came the same answer: "We know absolutely nothing of DAGGER.""You appear to be telling the truth," said the hidden voice. "A pity..."But it was more than merely unfortun"Tell us all about Dagger!"That was the command thrown at Napoleon Solo and Illya Kuryakin by the unseen THRUSH agents who kidnapped and interrogated them with lie detectors. And from each U.N.C.L.E. agent came the same answer: "We know absolutely nothing of DAGGER.""You appear to be telling the truth," said the hidden voice. "A pity..."But it was more than merely unfortunate that the U.N.C.L.E. organization had never heard of DAGGER. For the secret behind that name was an insane plot for mass murder - the murder of the human race....

Title : The Dagger Affair
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 2686066
Format Type : Mass Market Paperback
Number of Pages : 159 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Dagger Affair Reviews

  • A
    2019-04-20 00:18

    I've heard that David McDaniel is one of the better Uncle writers, and that holds true with this book. The Dagger Affair is a pretty good rip-roaring tale with the added attraction of a deranged villain causing Thrush and Uncle to temporarily join forces. We're treated to the history and background of Thrush via a charming Thrush leader and his sweetly sadistic wife. One part of the novel that stayed with me from my first reading twenty years ago was the attempt to make a man talk by chaining him to the moving cable of the San Fransisco cable car, a task the Thrush wife takes great delight in. The book strays towards Raymond Chandler, but not absurdly so, has lots of Waverly, and well drawn portrayals of Napoleon and Illya. Plenty of humour and drama, and a diabolically evil device at the centre of the plot. The only glaring issue is that if our duo had thought to take the deranged villain in at the start of the book when he was unconscious in their hands, the whole thing might have been avoided.

  • Mike (the Paladin)
    2019-04-02 01:26

    I remember this one (and a couple of others) better than the rest. If you check my reviews of the earlier Man From U.N.C.L.E. tie in novels, you know that when I was (say) 13-15 I was a rabid U.N.C.L.E. fan. I had all the novels (not to mention a lot of other memorabilia) and this may be the best. I still remember the villains (Ward and Irene Baldwin) and Napoleon's near demise (demises?) also the expansion of THRUSH (Technological Hierarchy for the Removal of Undesirables and the Subjugation of Humanity ) I really enjoyed these books (and the TV series...even the bad episodes) and get sucked into the nostalgia every time I run across it in almost any form, so prejudice admitted, this may be the best of the lot and for me it's a 5.

  • Ralph
    2019-04-15 00:37

    This is an important book in the "Man From U.N.C.L.E" series because in it Dave McDaniel (the best of the handful who wrote these novelizations) not only gives us the history of THRUSH, tracing it from 19th Century London as the brainchild of a man who could be Professor Moriarty, but finally tells us what THRUSH means and why it is always written in upper case letters...it has nothing to do with the bird.

  • Lily
    2019-04-15 01:23

    McDaniel captured the characters well--Illya gets knocked out three times, Napoleon is distracted by ladies, and they easily let the bad guys get away. Perfect.(I got 3 different McDaniel MFU books for my birthday and I'm quite pleased. Don't let my snark fool you, these spies may be incompetent at times but the knuckleheads kind of own my heart.)

  • Mike Jensen
    2019-04-13 22:20

    ADAPTATION SCHOLARS, TAKE NOTE OF THIS BOOK.Is it possible for a TV-tie in to be better than the series? In theory, yes, but I had not seen it actually happen until I read this novelizaton of THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. However glowing your memories of the show may be, it really was not very good in the sixties and looks worse when viewed today, at least after the excellent pilot. This book, however, is just a good book, whether you like the series or not. It is punchilly written, the story moves, the author bothers with characterizations of both familiar and unfamiliar characters, and he makes some things that seemed implausible about the series, especially the villainous organization Thrush, seem much more plausible. McDaniel does almost everything right starting with giving Thrush a human face, a likable villain who is dedicated to the organization and to himself, which amount to the same thing in this telling. He makes sense of their systems and divisions is most ways, though McDaniel makes the mistake of telling us that Thrush is a smaller organization than U.N.C.L.E., which is quite impossible. Operating with the cooperation of many nations and the law enforcement of those nations means that U.N.C.L.E. does not need the intelligence operation that Thrush would need nor the infrastructure to ensure their secrecy. McDaniel did not think this through. There are minor problems. The explanation of the Thrush acronym is lame, even if you concede its fictional age. Waverly always calls Napoleon Solo, "Mr. Solo" in the TV series, so the familiar form of address in the book stands out as wrong and there seems to be one or more scenes missing between pages 87 and 88, thought that may have been hurried writing or bad copy editing. The addition of a mere sentence could fix this problem. Nor did McDaniel think through the McGuffin of this story. It is an energy damper that shuts off electricity, including batteries and the electrical system in the human body. What powers it? We know it is not wind, solar, or the waves, so it has to be batteries or electricity. Since it works by proximity, that which is closest to the machine shuts off first as the dampening field expands. In other words, it should shut itself off first before it can shut off anything else. This problem did not occur to the author, and that was a very, very stupid mistake. That aside, there are several pleasures including four Shakespeare quotations, well, three with one repeated, the origin of Thrush - it began from the ashes of the criminal organization run by Prof. Moriarty, Sherlock Holmes's adversary, and something the TV series never had: a real sense of place, here San Francisco, to ground the improbable story in the real world. Overall this book is quite an achievement and mostly holds up more than 50 years after it was written. How many TV tie-ins can you say that about?

  • Timothy Boyd
    2019-04-03 19:36

    Excellent book adaptation of the TV series. Great spy adventure book. This is how the CIA and FBI should operate. Recommended

  • Ed Wyrd
    2019-04-04 02:22

    Another fun, pulp-like read. This time UNCLE and THRUSH, mortal enemies, must team up to stop a new world-wide danger. Waverly actually sees some action in the field.

  • Ronald
    2019-04-13 23:40

    read during school year 1965-66, possibly in spring