Read Pose, Wobble, Flow: A Culturally Proactive Approach to Literacy Instruction by Antero Garcia Cindy O'Donnell-Allen Online

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This book proposes a pedagogical model called Pose, Wobble, Flow to encapsulate the challenge of teaching and the process of growing as an educator who questions existing inequities in schooling and society and frames teaching around a commitment to changing them. The authors provide six different culturally proactive teaching stances or poses that secondary ELA teachers cThis book proposes a pedagogical model called Pose, Wobble, Flow to encapsulate the challenge of teaching and the process of growing as an educator who questions existing inequities in schooling and society and frames teaching around a commitment to changing them. The authors provide six different culturally proactive teaching stances or poses that secondary ELA teachers can use to meet the needs of all students, whether they are historically marginalized or privileged. They describe how teachers can expect to wobble as they adapt instruction to the needs of their students, while also incorporating new insights about their own cultural positionality and preconceptions about teaching. Teachers are encouraged to recognize this flexibility as a positive process or flow that can be used to address challenges and adopt ambitious teaching strategies like those depicted in this book. Each chapter highlights a particular pose, describes how to work through common wobbles, incorporates teacher voices, and provides questions for further discussion. Pose, Wobble, Flow presents a promising framework for disrupting the pervasive myth that there is one set of surefire, culturally neutral best practices....

Title : Pose, Wobble, Flow: A Culturally Proactive Approach to Literacy Instruction
Author :
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ISBN : 9780807756522
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 176 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Pose, Wobble, Flow: A Culturally Proactive Approach to Literacy Instruction Reviews

  • David Schaafsma
    2018-12-28 18:12

    I was asked to review this book. The main professional hat I wear is English educator, which means I prepare undergraduate and graduate students to teach grades 6-12 English, primarily in the Chicago area.Garcia and O'Donnell-Allen are writing in what is now familiar territory in education, how to work with a culturally diverse population of students. Most teachers that work in urban areas, working with a vast majority of people of color, are white women. They are given by the state the Common Core Standards, which assumes all students need the same thing everywhere. No acknowledgment of diversity. Few or possibly no teachers in a multicultural society agree with that position, but having said that, young (and in my school, often suburban white and well-meaning and committed) teachers do come in with assumptions about teaching that have to be discussed. They need to work with students and talk about those experiences to learn and grow as beginning teachers.There's research that would seem to indicate that white teachers sometimes expect less of their black students:http://www.theatlantic.com/education/...http://everydayfeminism.com/2015/08/1...There's a host of books and movies about this. There's some great movies, such as Half Nelson, about a complicated drug-addicted but still very good and human History teacher, and some movies that make out white female teachers to be heroes in "ghetto" schools, such Dangerous Minds and Freedom Writers.There's also a funny parody or two hat helps to make a useful point about unhelpful cultural assumptions:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVF-n...Garcia and O'Donnell-Allen know the literature of "culturally relevant" pedagogy and lay out, in primarily theoretical terms, various ways one can be what they call "culturally proactive" in teaching literacy. They pose six different stances or "poses" teachers can use in working with their students, which are really just general approaches to teaching: 1) being vulnerable with students (being a learner with students about their cultures and communities); 2) literacy as social action (connecting community and the classroom); 3) writing with students; 4) "curating" the reading curriculum by choosing relevant texts; 5) designing classroom spaces for democracy, and 6) teaching for praxis. Many of them as you can imagine bleed into each other; they are very similar, really. The basic point is to listen to students and community and not just going in their to try and "save" kids from their lives. Their contribution is that there are myriad ways to teach well, but you can't just go into the classroom with little or no training (as in Teach for America) and expect success.They talk about how you adopt a "pose" (or theoretical approach), and acknowledge you have to "wobble" in an approach before you "flow," an idea they in part borrow rom Csikszentmihalyi. The strength of the book is the range of ideas for how to think of cultural relevance; the weakness is that it is almost exclusively theoretical. Most of this stuff is by now very familiar to experienced urban teachers (and it's not just for urban teachers, it's any multicultural classroom), but I thin it may be useful to have this for new teachers. It's missing sufficient models to help new teachers do what they say, but I still liked it. New teachers that read it won't be as naive as the teacher in that parody video.

  • Xirzee
    2018-12-30 00:55

    LOVED this book!! Very thought-provoking and directly relevant to those who want to teach reading and writing. Had some SJW-theory, which was annoying (they even equated death threats made to Anita Sarkeesian as indicators of sexism, for goodness sake! Obviously I don't condone death threats, but I also don't believe that death threats necessarily denote sexism within society). Despite its faulty discussion on identity politics, I do think the book writes very well on understanding that a teacher's personal views will always affect his or her style of teaching. The book even discusses how trying to interact with students without "an agenda" is basically still teaching with one – to which I completely agree. So, even though the book promotes and encourages the inclusion of SJW-theory/identity politics within the classroom, its core discussion on how to implement a teacher's "agenda" within the classroom and why that predicament is unavoidable and necessary can be generally applied by anyone. Would definitely recommend this book to anyone who wants to better think about how to approach teaching reading and writing within the classroom. 4.7/5 for accuracy.

  • Jim
    2019-01-03 19:01

    Garcia and O’Donnell-Allen pack lots of theoretical and practical wisdom into this slim volume aimed at preservice teachers, in-service teachers, and teacher educators. Using a framework borrowed from yoga, they posit that effective teaching evolves when practitioners adopt conscious poses (or attitudes/dispositions) toward teaching, experience wobble as they adapt and modify their methods as a result of reflection, and achieve flow as they re-adjust their poses in light of formative feedback. As they explain, this is a recursive and constant process.Working from a social justice orientation, the authors use examples from their own practice to demonstrate five specific teaching poses—teacher as hacker, teacher as facilitator of civic engagement, teacher as writer, teacher as curator, and teacher as designer—as they challenge us to examine our own practice and identify ways we can induce wobble to improve our effectiveness.Accessible enough for new teachers, engaging enough for veteran teachers, and practical enough to make a real difference—this is a text I intend to share widely with colleagues and students.

  • Karen Yelton-Curtis
    2018-12-18 19:15

    The recurring message in the book that I most appreciate is this: teachers need to do what's best for their students. Yes, we need to be mindful of teaching standards, school district mandates, and school-site emphases, but our gut instincts should guide our work with kids. The authors provide examples from their teaching situations and also spotlight the work of colleagues who have found ways to "hack" the systems in which they have chosen to teach. There is emphasis on authentic assessment and teaching for social change, although I would not force my students into any one corner of curriculum; the book has encouraged me to orient my instruction this year around student passions -- any of which could guide students toward social action of some type. The book is an effective booster shot for teachers at the beginning of a school year.

  • Dalton
    2019-01-06 18:09

    Very useful resource for teachers.

  • Amanda
    2018-12-27 17:55

    This was more theory than practice, but a good reminder of things I know to be true.

  • Karma
    2019-01-08 20:09

    Inspirational and thought-provoking in parts, but it leave out the "how to." Also, it's more geared toward high school teachers than middle school teachers (as is often the case - much to my annoyance).

  • Jennifer Wittemann
    2018-12-27 22:57

    I'm reading this for the NWP CRW program. This was a good summer read to put me in the mindset of preparing for a new year of learners, moving into a new classroom space, trying on new instructional strategies, and hoping to really work on identifying myself as Teacher as Writer.

  • AcaciaLasita
    2018-12-26 23:50

    Absolutely loved and was changed by this book.