Read Outpost by F.T. McKinstry Online

outpost

In a war-torn realm occupied by a race of immortal warlords called the Fylking, trouble can reach cosmic proportions. Using the realm as a backwater outpost from which to fight an ancient war, the Fylking guard an interdimensional portal called the Gate. The Fylking’s enemies, who think nothing of annihilating a world to gain even a small advantage, are bent on destroyingIn a war-torn realm occupied by a race of immortal warlords called the Fylking, trouble can reach cosmic proportions. Using the realm as a backwater outpost from which to fight an ancient war, the Fylking guard an interdimensional portal called the Gate. The Fylking’s enemies, who think nothing of annihilating a world to gain even a small advantage, are bent on destroying it.After two centuries of peace, the realm is at war. A Gate warden with a tormented past discovers a warlock gathering an army that cannot die. A King’s Ranger is snared in a trap that pits him against the Fylking's enemies. And a knitter discovers an inborn power revered by the gods themselves. Caught in a maelstrom of murder, treachery, sorcery and war, they must rally to protect the Gate against a plot that will violate the balance of cosmos, destroy the Fylking and leave the world in ruins.The god they serve is as fickle as a crow....

Title : Outpost
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 26033947
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 351 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Outpost Reviews

  • Mark Lawrence
    2019-03-22 09:35

    I haven't read this book (yet), but it is one of the 10 finalists in the Self-Published Fantasy Blog-Off. That's 10 out of 300 hopefuls!Read about the competition herehttp://mark---lawrence.blogspot.co.uk...See ratings and reviews of all the finalists here:http://mark---lawrence.blogspot.co.uk...

  • Dianne
    2019-04-12 14:34

    Immortal warriors who live by the sword. A gate between the worlds.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Enter to win one of three eCopiesClick on Banner to EnterThey became three misfit warriors, allies in the battle between good and evil. Now the fate of their world lay in their hands. Welcome to the Outpost, where the portal to another realm must be kept closed or the wrath of hell and power hungry monsters will plow every living creature down in a bloodbath of terror and annihilation.The Fylking, alien immortal warriors have long used the realm as an Outpost against infiltration from an ancient intergalactic foe and its army of zombie-like soldiers. Arcmael a seer and once the son of power and wealth, has chosen a solitary life where he has become the servant of the Fylking. It is time to leave his tortured past behind as the dangers of magic and war become an ever-growing threat. Will he rise up from the ashes of his life with newfound pride and purpose?Melisande will live through the vilest of circumstances, in part because she has a god-given power to knit magic into the yarn she uses. Feared by her countrymen and sought after by armies, her heart belongs to one the one man who has been kept from her through politics and treachery. Othin’s duty is to defend the realm, but one night of drunkenness leaves a gap in his memory that will be the tool of blackmail used, forcing him to choose between his love for Melisande and his sworn duty to uphold the honor of another. Together these three will make unlikely heroes most likely to die, but in times of need unlikely allies will rise to stand with them. Follow their journey, watch their hidden strengths evolve as the world around them becomes a battleground for warlocks, immortals and the soldiers of a dead army.F.T. McKinstry has shown great strength in writing and blending three separate tales, one for each character into one huge tapestry of suspense, treachery and magical wars. From the details of scenes that seem to come from the past, take the paths uncovered through dense and deadly forests and step inside a small cottage with the smell of wood smoke and herbs. Watch as each character comes to life, or in the case of the draugr, re-animate in death. A well told dark fantasy that twists around itself like a cobra waiting to strike.I received this copy from F.T. McKinstry in exchange for my honest review.Publication Date: November 1, 2015Publisher: F.T. McKinstryGenre: Epic FantasyPrint Length: 370 pagesAvailable from: Amazon | Barnes & NobleFor Reviews & More: http://tometender.blogspot.com

  • Mogsy (MMOGC)
    2019-04-15 15:26

    3 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2016/12/26/...There’s a lot to say about Outpost by F.T. McKinstry. Rich in detail and beautifully written, the book features incredible world-building, taking place in a fantasy setting that breaks the bounds of expectations. The cultures and concepts and creatures portrayed in this novel are also brought to life so vividly that they practically leap off the pages. That said though, if you’re looking for a story that grabs you right away, this one might not be for you; there are many things going on beneath the surface, and McKinstry arguably takes a slow-burn, tantalizing approach in drawing out its mysteries. It’s therefore a book that might require a fair bit of patience, but could be worth it.Outpost introduces us to the world of Math, an epic fantasy realm steeped in both political and military conflict. Complicating the situation is the presence of unseen immortal warrior creatures called the Fylking, said to have originated from another dimension by coming through an ancient portal. The Fylking themselves are fighting a war with an enemy called the Niflsekt, using Math as a strategic outpost after training a select group of human seers as Wardens to guard the interdimensional gate that leads back to their home world. Wardens also have the ability to see the Fylking, who may take on the avatars of animals when they need to communicate, but generally they are invisible to the rest of the population. After two centuries though, human seers are disappearing, and without the eyes and ears of their helpful Wardens, the Fylking are threatened with the possibility of continuing their war blind.The story follows three POVs. First is Othin, a Ranger sworn to protect the people of Math. A fierce fighter and a free spirit, he patrols across the land, guarding travel routes and enforcing peace in towns. His fellow Rangers respect and look up to him, and he also receives no small amount of attention from the smitten ladies wherever he goes. Othin’s heart, however, already belongs to a young woman named Melisande. Millie, as she is called, possesses a special kind of gift called Pattern Sense – a type of magic they say is touched by the gods. To the people who live in Millie’s village though, that kind of power is difficult to understand, and she becomes ostracized, distrusted, and labeled a witch. Finally, there’s the seer Arcmael, the disavowed oldest son of a prominent lord. Little did he know, being banished from his home would lead him on the path of becoming a Warden, trained by the Fylking and tasked to guard their gateway, even though Arcmael has sworn never again to take up the sword.It probably comes as no surprise, one of the most alluring aspects of Outpost was the world of Math. This is high fantasy with a heavy emphasis on lore, highlighting the sense of age and intensity. This is, after all, a story involving a race of beings who have been around for a long, long time. They have changed the face of the world and influenced the culture of its people. Admittedly it’s a lot to take in, but the world-building being far more interesting than most, getting the hang of it was a lot easier than I expected. It might also help to check out the glossary in the back to familiarize yourself with the many names of places, people, and terms before you start, which would make the avalanche of information a little less overwhelming.I guess in a way, the author’s love for detail can also be considered a double-edged sword. McKinstry writes gorgeously, but despite the excellent prose and the novel’s great setting, her style can take some getting used to. I mentioned the rich level of detail, but at times the overburden of information can come at the cost of potential confusion, as well as plot pacing. I confess I found the story to be on the slower side, and if you have a busy schedule that limits your reading time to short bursts here and there (like it did in my case), it’ll take a lot more motivation to pick up the book again and to keep pressing on.I also enjoyed the characters, but did not take to them all equally. My favorite was perhaps Othin, whose “classic hero” persona belies a more complicated spirit beneath. He may come across a bold, somewhat rash fighter who works hard but plays harder, if his tavern habits are any indication. The truth is though, he’s a real softie. I liked this mellower, more romantic side of him—which might actually explain my eventual disappointment in Melisande’s character. So much of Othin’s motivations were bound up in his love for her, but I had a hard time feeling it, especially with his initial dismissal of their courtship as casual. They shared very little page time together too, which didn’t help. I also wished Millie had a more active role in the story, especially since her Pattern Sense is so interesting. My least favorite character was Arcmael, however, whose chapters were the toughest to get through, which is ironic considering how much I enjoyed reading about the Fylking (as a Warden, Arcmael’s POV gave us the most information about them). I think most of my problems with his character stem from the fact that we don’t get to know the truth of his origins until closer to the end of the book, and so many of his early motivations are hard to understand.Despite my issues though, I definitely enjoyed Outpost. To sum up, it’s a solid self-pubbed novel. McKinstry can write, and she has the imaginative vision to create this incredible, fascinating world to stoke the envy of fantasy writers everywhere. To truly grab me though, the story could have used some streamlining to improve the pacing, and the characters probably needed more impetus. But overall, I had a good time.

  • Erica
    2019-04-18 09:23

    War is lurking and evil is brewing, and three unlikely allies must come together to stop it.This is a fascinating tale, full of creatures one doesn’t encounter every day. My personal favorite were the draugrs, an underused Norse version of zombies. But these guys are way cooler than zombies. They’re tough and evil, and something to be feared, awakened by the hand of an evil sorcerer, my absolute favorite type of villain.Melisande was definitely my favorite of the characters. She is self-sufficient, smart, and finding her way around the magic she didn’t quite know she could use. With her ability, she’s able to knit spells into clothing, something straight out of a fairy tale. I have no idea if that has been used before, but I can’t recall reading anything like it. For me, it was new and fresh and definitely unexpected.Arcmael comes second on my list of the three main characters. He’s genuinely likable and relatable, being forced into his profession by an overbearing father. He doesn’t quite fit his role as a warden, but he has begrudgingly accepted it. He was real to me and very believable. He gained several notches for me when he made a personal sacrifice to save a friend whom he hadn’t known long. It showed what kind of a person he is, that he’s willing to do what it takes to put things right, and I liked that about him.Othin was all right, but not my favorite. His early chapters have too much about his womanizing, boobs, and hookers. That’s all well and good and served to show what kind of man he is. It just didn’t make me like him. Though his dedication to Millie is admirable. He grew on me a little as the story went.Rich and beautiful descriptions of the landscape and characters really stood out in this story. I could picture myself there. I love it when I’m allowed to live in a fantasy world, even one as messed up as this place becomes. The action moves a little slow at first, but toward the end it’s very hard to put this book down.I was given a free copy in exchange for an honest review.

  • J. Ellyne
    2019-03-25 14:19

    This is a great book. I highly recommend it. It's high magic and sword epic fantasy. I guess there will be a sequel and I'm looking forward to it. There are three protagonists and McKinstry switches from one's POV to another through the book and manages these transitions beautifully. They all need to work together to defeat the Demons who threaten to come through the gateway from Otherworld and destroy the (fantasy but realistic) world of our heroes and heroine. One of the heroes is a Ranger named Othin, a good man betrayed by his bad employer (sound familiar anyone?). Othin has a lover named Mellisande. His knickname for her his Millie. She knows high magic but is very modest about it. I think I can always see the character in a novel who is the author's surrogate and I think Ms. McKinstry has put a lot of her personality into Millie and therefore we get to meet Ms. McKinstry in the pages of Outpost. I wished there would have been more Millie in the book but I bet we get a lot more of her in the sequel and I can't wait. The final character is mild mannered Arcmael. He's a warden, belonging to a group committed to helping the Fylking, nonhuman alien good guys (mostly good anyway), to protect the towers that keep the gateway to and from otherworld closed to Demons and other bad guys. He doesn't want to fight but is left with no choice. The fate of the world will depend on him, Millie, and Othin. Arcmael also has a good bit of magic which helps and he ends up being pretty good with a sword as well.A major subplot of the book is the love story of Othin and Mellie. They become separated by events beyond their control. Will they ever get together again? Will they end up living happily ever after? Will they be able to save the world together? Sorry no spoilers. Read it and find out. You will not guess the ending. It's not trite but it's not really sad either. Ms. McKinstry admits she has been heavily influenced by Tolkien, like so many of us have been, but I think in at least one respect she has done Tolkien one better and that's in pacing. Her pace builds like that of a Stephen King novel, laconic at first, then very interesting and mysterious, and finally becoming a thrilling drama, ratcheting along to an epic conclusion at breakneck speed. At some point it will become really hard for you to put the book down. I'm going to also post this review on Amazon, Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, and Kobo because Outpost is available as an Ebook at all those places, worldwide. You should buy it, you won't be sorry.

  • W. Tinkanesh
    2019-04-19 16:24

    A rogue warden, a rogue ranger, a rogue witch, and a lot of wandering, but that is part of their jobs. Arcmael is a Warden; estranged son of Lord Halstaeg the High Constable of the King’s Rangers, he has forsaken his Guardians. Othin, named after the Trickster God, is the Ranger who loves Melisande, but gets set up for a marriage he doesn’t want. Melisande, who knits with Pattern Sense, knits wonderful pieces of clothing, but is suspected of witchcraft by most of the people she knows. Who can they trust?‘Outpost’ is a well written novel, a fantasy saga itching to burst into the stars. It is Book One of ‘The Fylking’. The Fylking are mysterious warriors from another star system, who appear only to their human wardens, seers they trained to protect the Gate, an inter-dimensional portal between the Realm of Math and a nearby star system.Politics and supernatural intertwine and weave together. Magick is afoot and war could break out any day between Dyrregin and Fjorgin. F.T. McKinstry created a complex world of Norse inspiration where Otherworldly creatures abound in the treacherous fog and tangled forest. The captivated readers will follow the heroes along abrupt mountainsides and across lively rivers, questioning the ground they tread, while listening to distant echoes of Tolkien.On the technical side, ‘Outpost’ is the kind of novel where a glossary and a map should be mandatory.NB: I was given a free e-copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.

  • Theresa Leone Davidson
    2019-04-02 14:26

    There is no doubt that this book is beautifully written, and I loved the characters, especially Arcmael, and I enjoy reading novels so different from what I normally read. All of that is why I gave it three stars; however, it is me, not the novel, but I just do not really like fantasy. It is a genre that I just cannot really get into, never have (have never read a Harry Potter nor seen any of the films), though if I have to read a story of fantasy, I am glad it was one this good. :)

  • Michael Smith
    2019-04-15 09:37

    Outpost, Book One of The Fylking, the author’s meticulously crafted new fantasy series, is a truly masterful achievement.The Fylking are powerful, otherworldy beings who use the planet Math as a portal to numerous planes of existence where they battle the mysterious and deadly Niflsekt. While respected and feared among the people of Math, the Fylking are also distant and abstract, and the novel creates a wondrous sense of human beings battered by unknown forces beyond their comprehension, playing out their own conflicts with a disturbing yet fully accepted belief that godlike beings always have the final say and may be manipulating humans to their own ends.Book One focuses on three excellently drawn main characters, who anchor and make concrete the novel’s world-building: Arcmael, a warden tasked with being an intermediary between humans of Math and the Fylking; Melisande, a knitter who begins to understand that the “pattern sense” she weaves is actually ancient magic with more power than she ever suspected; and Othin, Melisande’s lover, a warrior and King’s ranger who becomes a renegade to escape a dreary political marriage with his boss’s manipulative daughter.Constantly encountering serious trouble against the background of coming war, each of these characters has limitations and powers which they must face up to during their adventures. These aren’t just stereotypical fantasy characters or superheroes who always know exactly what to do. Their past defines them but they are open to vast future change. They learn about themselves and discover new strengths even as conflicts erupt many levels above their understanding. The three are multi-layered personalities, products of their culture, subject to its traditions and with their own psychic shadows.The novel has a sensuous, visceral, you-are-there feel. The settings and plot are well-wrought but never overdone. As you suffuse yourself in the complex characters, the background of the coming of war and the history of Fylking involvement on this planet unfold effortlessly. The bad characters are also very real, again not overdone, acting from ambition and power impulses not so different from what we encounter in real life, so that when they oppose our main characters, their actions are all ring true.I have no idea what lies in store for the second book, but the thoroughly satisfying ending does beg for more investigation of the Fylking. There is an epic structural sense about this series already apparent in Book One. The Fylking have been demonstrated to be central to this book, but in many ways they’ve been backstage during the narrative; thus we look forward to further revelations in Book Two, and we sense it won’t be a mere sequel, that the author has much more to unfold about this intriguing planet and its uncanny gateways to other worlds.Review by Michael D. Smith

  • Dallas
    2019-04-16 10:17

    I do enjoy a good fantasy book, and I say a Good Fantasy book, and Outpost fulfilled all the requirements. McKinstry's solid world-building skills set the stage where otherworldly magical and ephemeral beings perform. McKinstry draws inspiration from mythical Nordic tales and brings these to the fore with her characters. Millie, the Northern country girl has Pattern Sense, the ability to knit and bring things into being, and an innate magical ability to interact between worlds. Although the action centres around Arcmael, a warden to the Fylking, and Othin a patrolling Ranger and who is also Millie's sometimes lover, it is however, Millie who takes centre-stage in the magical and spiritual drama that is Outpost.I'm looking forward to my next installment of Fylking.The Fylking, those otherworldly and godlike beings, have all the trappings that you would expect eternal warriors to have: armour, swords, wisdom etc. Sometimes you see them, and other times you don't. Even if you can't sense their presence it is still there. They make their mark on a landscape studded with stony Gate Towers.Outpost: The Fylking #1 is clever mix of mythical elements, faery tale, sword & sorcery, and romantic lust.

  • HeatherAnne Norbury
    2019-04-15 17:26

    Outpost is an enjoyable fantasy novel, intricately written to weave magic with politics. The reader follows the warden Arcmael, protected by the Fylking, the ranger Othin, who defends the humans of this world, and the witch Melisande, magical with knitting and touched by the gods. All three main characters have their strengths though my favorite is Melisande. With a hint of Dickens's Madame Defarge, Melisande knits magic into her creations that aid many people in all sorts of ways. Outpost is filled with beautiful imagery and touches of magic on every page. While the world starts at relative peace, war is coming and political intrigue makes it uncertain who our heroes can and can't trust. This is book one of The Fylking series. I look forward to reading more about these Gods of War in future books of the series.

  • Cloud Riser
    2019-04-03 09:43

    This book was awesome. The world building was great and indepth, yet believable and not overwhelming. I love how the author handled magic and the gods of their world. Like usual, it’s hard to talk about the plot without giving things away. What I’ll say is: the plot is solid. The characters are diverse and interesting. Everything flows and comes together.It reads like a typical high fantasy, so fans of that genre will like it. It isn’t an intimidating length, so I enjoyed that as well. Also, the plot and world isn’t so complex that people who aren’t as familiar with the genre can’t handle it.I just liked this book. I’m not sure what else to say beyond all of that. Go read!

  • Fee Roberts
    2019-03-29 17:26

    Outpost by F.T. McKinstry is a fantasy novel about immortal warlords called the Fylking, and a warlock using Fylking magic to create an army to destroy the world. This is your typical good against evil fantasy. but the world building and character development is anything but typical. F.T. McKinstry's writing style is superb. For a self published novel, this is an excellent fantasy story. I won the Outpost in a blog giveaway, and all opinions are my own.

  • Kme_17
    2019-04-09 11:29

    I received this book as a first read. This was a great read! I love all the creatures in the tale. I also enjoyed many of the characters. I will definitely read on in this series. Recommend if you are looking for a wonderful fantasy book.

  • L.K. Evans
    2019-03-23 17:44

    This is a really hard book to summarize. I’d have to lamely say it’s about some new bad guys that pop up and our good guys try to figure out who/what they are. I mean, that’s really bad. There’s a lot going on in this book, a lot of character growth, a lot of character confusion and mystery. I have to start by saying if I had a map, I might have loved this a bit more. My problem is that our group travels to, or talks about, lots of places. Because I’m visual, I had one hell of a time imagining where they were at any given time, which hindered my understanding of certain timelines and events. To make matters worse, there’s a lot of terms thrown out very early on in this book, and if you don’t pay attention you’ll be lost. If I had felt more grounded in the story, I could have easily loved this book. As it was, I found myself lost one too many times. Normally those negatives would end up lowering my rating farther, but I thoroughly enjoyed the characters and the world. There’s ghouls and Fylking and elves and goblins and so many other things that I can’t remember them all. The world has as much going on as the story; tons of nuances and a wide range of creatures. There’s gates that lead to other worlds and, if broken, allow in a variety of creatures. Wardens protect them, along with their Fylking guardians. Those creatures were very interesting indeed.As for characters, I liked them all, which is rare for me. Millie was a free-spirited woman living in a village where one of the gateways I mentioned earlier exists. She’s got a power we don’t initially understand, but it was delightful and frightening to see it grow. Archmael was my favorite character, probably because the poor guy kept getting pushed into a direction he didn’t want to go, no matter how much he fought it. Forced to a life as a warden, it was easy for me to relate to his battle between his love of solitude and his need for companionship. Othin was a ranger; your typical good looking, womanizing hero. He does have a love who owns his heart, regardless of his frivolous sex life. I think the reason I liked him was because his scenes had the most action.Pacing was okay in this book. I’d have liked some of the explanations to be spread out, delivered at more pertinent times. A few info dumps had me glazing over, which probably explains why it took effort for me to grasp all that was happening. There was a lot of imagery in this book, and sometimes it slowed things down for me. Regardless, I did enjoy the writing.Overall, I’d say anyone who likes a plethora of creatures should definitely pick this up. I highly suggest paying attention in the beginning—no matter how arduous it is to you—so the rest of the book makes sense. I certainly wish I had taken my time with it.EDIT: I just looked at the author's website and there is a map available. Rather beautiful too. I really wish it would have been in the book. Here’s the link: https://ftmckinstry.files.wordpress.c...

  • W. Tinkanesh
    2019-03-21 13:31

    A rogue warden, a rogue ranger, a rogue witch, and a lot of wandering, but that is part of their jobs. Arcmael is a Warden; estranged son of Lord Halstaeg the High Constable of the King’s Rangers, he has forsaken his Guardians. Othin, named after the Trickster God, is the Ranger who loves Melisande, but gets set up for a marriage he doesn’t want. Melisande, who knits with Pattern Sense, knits wonderful pieces of clothing, but is suspected of witchcraft by most of the people she knows. Who can they trust?‘Outpost’ is a well written novel, a fantasy saga itching to burst into the stars. It is Book One of ‘The Fylking’. The Fylking are mysterious warriors from another star system, who appear only to their human wardens, seers they trained to protect the Gate, an inter-dimensional portal between the Realm of Math and a nearby star system.Politics and supernatural intertwine and weave together. Magick is afoot and war could break out any day between Dyrregin and Fjorgin. F.T. McKinstry created a complex world of Norse inspiration where Otherworldly creatures abound in the treacherous fog and tangled forest. The captivated readers will follow the heroes along abrupt mountainsides and across lively rivers, questioning the ground they tread, while listening to distant echoes of Tolkien.On the technical side, ‘Outpost’ is the kind of novel where a glossary and a map should be mandatory.NB: I was given a free e-copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.

  • Simon Williams
    2019-04-03 17:35

    An enjoyable high fantasy / epic fantasy read, which gathers pace as the story goes on. The world is well thought out and the author has clearly put a fair bit of planning into the background. There's a lot of intrigue and politics which means you need to pay attention to the detail rather than skimming through at any point (not a particular issue for me). Recommended to readers who enjoy well-structured and intricate fantasy.

  • Janet
    2019-04-20 17:16

    Enjoyable fantasy.

  • G.R. Matthews
    2019-03-27 12:24

    Review to appear on Fantasy-Faction as part of the SPFBO. I'll tell you this, I enjoyed it.

  • Vanessa
    2019-04-05 17:36

    Sci-fi/Norse-fantasy mashup: Invisible warrior aliens must be managed by human "wardens" to protect the general populace from their mischief and maintain the aliens' stargate. Polished prose but super infodumpy. The characterization is so-so. The plotline meanders without purpose for far too long that I eventually lost interest.

  • Katharine (Ventureadlaxre)
    2019-04-09 14:41

    Broken into three main POV characters, we start off with Arcamel, a warden, who can see invisible (to others) creatures. This makes the start interesting as we immediately learn that the creatures aren't necessarily good or bad - they're tricky, which is always a winner for me. We also have Othin, a ranger, and Melisandre, who at first seems like a herbalist and craftswoman (yay, knitting!) but its her journey of discovery and coming into power that drives much of the novel. Which is good, as I'm mighty tired of women being there just as healers. Through action and hardship they all join each other - Arcamel having cast away his familiars, Othin having to turn away from his employer, and Melisandre cast from her village for her unfathomable powers. Along with some background characters we have a very enjoyable book if you like to read for character rather than plot - not that this lacks for plot at all, only that it's history, world-building, magic-system, and character-heavy. This is character driven and so I should love it. However parts drag here and there simply because some parts felt rushed and others dragged with slight info-dumping, nothing a determined line editor couldn't vastly improve. A few parts meander slightly which made it a little too easy to put down in places, but we're rewarded with a decent ending. A few parts were vastly American which threw me out of the story completely (nothing is more annoying than their penchant for 'could care less', which makes no sense...) which is a shame, as it reminds you you're not actually in some other world at all.The romance in this book is slight and well-handled, feeling like one of the more realistic elements of the book. They didn't exaggerate or wax poetically about their misfortunes, and you're left really hoping that things come out alright for them. Overall this is a decent self-published book, but it needs work in places to be considered beyond that. There's a triggering scene which I felt could have used some work (though I'm possibly a harsh critic on this topic at the moment. And I'm just reading The Deed of Paksenarrion by Elizabeth Moon which is handling it the best I've ever seen, so...) and overall... this would have to be my second favourite book read for this challenge.