Read Symmetries of Things by John H. Conway Heidi Burgiel Chaim Goodman-Strauss Online

symmetries-of-things

Start with a single shape. Repeat it in some way--translation, reflection over a line, rotation around a point--and you have created symmetry. Symmetry is a fundamental phenomenon in art, science, and nature that has been captured, described, and analyzed using mathematical concepts for a long time. Inspired by the geometric intuition of Bill Thurston and empowered by hisStart with a single shape. Repeat it in some way--translation, reflection over a line, rotation around a point--and you have created symmetry. Symmetry is a fundamental phenomenon in art, science, and nature that has been captured, described, and analyzed using mathematical concepts for a long time. Inspired by the geometric intuition of Bill Thurston and empowered by his own analytical skills, John Conway, with his coauthors, has developed a comprehensive mathematical theory of symmetry that allows the description and classification of symmetries in numerous geometric environments.This richly and compellingly illustrated book addresses the phenomenological, analytical, and mathematical aspects of symmetry on three levels that build on one another and will speak to interested lay people, artists, working mathematicians, and researchers....

Title : Symmetries of Things
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781568812205
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 448 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Symmetries of Things Reviews

  • Jeffrey
    2019-06-06 02:31

    Lets get the obvious out of the way. This is a math book. Still here? Good. This is a math book by among othersJohn Conway. You know, the creator of the Game of Life. I actually ran into the book through Chaim Goodman-Strauss, who has a wonderful podcast called Math Factor. Well worth your time if you are into recreational mathematics (and if you weren't, you probably would have stopped reading once I expected you to know who John Conway is). I'm afraid I don't know anything about Heidi Burgiel, so I can't really name drop her. Where was I?Ah yes, the book. This isn't your usual math book. Oh, it has lots of pretty pictures and beautiful equations (even better than)The Fractal Geometry of Nature. But this book has two big big things different. First up, the authors are very aware of what level they are writing to. The book is split into three parts, and in the intro they warn you Part 1 is for everyone, Part 2 is for those that know group theory, Part 3 is for professional mathematicians. That is exactly how the book lays out. For those of you that don't read math books for pleasure, this is very very rare.The other, and perhaps more shocking, thing is that it is written backwards. Oh, you get warned about that too, but it still comes as a shock as you finish the first chapter. See, math books are laid out so that you start at basic principles and step by step show bigger and bigger things. This is how math works. This book, on the other hand treats it more like an archaeological expedition where you are pawing around in some sand out in the Sahara and suddenly you find a gold cup. Wow this is cool! what else is here? By time you are through you know why everything was there. It is like the old school mystery novels where they "cheated" and after the detective got people together he starts revealing the clues the author never showed the reader. Except it works here. No, I don't know why. You end up having to keep a lot more in your head as (to steal from CS), he is presenting information in a stack rather than a queue. You have to remember what happened in the first chapter to get the payoff at the end.Anyway, I've blathered on long enough about it. I have no good objective complaints about the book. I don't know Group Theory, but it was the group theory jargon that killed me not the notation.

  • Peter Mcloughlin
    2019-06-05 04:18

    Lavishly illustrated and clear book on symmetries and how they relate to geometry and group theory. Whether it be tessellations, or repeating polyhedra in spherical, Euclidean or hyperbolic space and with topology included as well very down earth book for such an abstruse subject.

  • Eric Skaug
    2019-06-07 22:27

    Thoroughly enjoyed the first portion of this book. From there I understood progressively less (as the authors warned), but it was still fun to see what I could pick up as I went along. And of course, the illustrations were both beautiful and a fantastic aid to understanding.

  • Espen
    2019-06-09 00:20

    It is a beautiful book with lots of illustrative, colorful pictures, and completely awesome! Highly recommended for mathematically inclined children!