Read Deciphering Capital: Marx's Capital and Its Destiny by Alex Callinicos Online

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Marx's Capital is back where it belongs, at the centre of debate about Marxism and its purchase on the contemporary world. In recent years there has been an explosion of much wider interest in Capital, after the debate on Capital largely fell silent in the late-1970s. In Deciphering Capital, Alex Callinicos offers his own substantial contribution to the debate. He tacklesMarx's Capital is back where it belongs, at the centre of debate about Marxism and its purchase on the contemporary world. In recent years there has been an explosion of much wider interest in Capital, after the debate on Capital largely fell silent in the late-1970s. In Deciphering Capital, Alex Callinicos offers his own substantial contribution to the debate. He tackles the question of Marx's method, his relation to Hegel, value theory and labour. He engages with Marxist thinkers past and present, from Gramsci and Althusser to Harvey and Jameson....

Title : Deciphering Capital: Marx's Capital and Its Destiny
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ISBN : 9781909026681
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 334 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Deciphering Capital: Marx's Capital and Its Destiny Reviews

  • Rhys
    2018-11-22 05:38

    Brilliant scholarship, well written, and interesting.Having lumbered through Harvey, Heinrich, Althusser, Balibar, Jameson, Lebowitz, Meszaros, Sweeney, and Braverman on Marx's Capital, I found this refreshingly clear in thought and exposition. His discussions on Value, Labour, and Crises were top drawer.Wow. (And thanks Goodreads' Sara for recommending it).

  • Imran Rasid
    2018-11-29 06:34

    A rare 5 stars book! Very enlightening!Now for those who would like to embark on a journey through the arguments in the book, i must warned you that the author set the arguments with an assumption that you are already familiar with Marxian basic discourses, and more importantly, hegelian logics and phenomenology. In fact, if there is another subtitles added here, it would be; Marxian's quasi-hegelian method in Capital and its relevancy in the existing debates relating to it.Having said that, i must confess that there are many parts in the book that i makes me struggling, and some others have to be skimmed through and bookmarked for later. This is the sort of book that might insist to be read more than once.Regardless, this book open my eyes to a new reading of Marx and Hegel, and the importance of such readings in understanding some of the substantialist criticism made against Marx. The book taught me that there is so much you cna learn if one attempt at a close reading of the texts, instead of just simple reading process.I hope to reread this again, and maybe i will be more prepared next time.

  • Sara
    2018-11-12 22:31

    Society must be defended[Through my ratings, reviews and edits I'm providing intellectual property and labor to Amazon.com Inc., listed on Nasdaq, which fully owns Goodreads.com and in 2013 posted revenues for $74 billion and $274 million profits. Intellectual property and labor require compensation. Amazon.com Inc. is also requested to provide assurance that its employees and contractors' work conditions meet the highest health and safety standards at all the company's sites].Extremely difficult, but maybe for this reason marvelous book, going in the opposite direction to those who try to show how sensible ol' Marx was (Harvey for example tends to offer a pre-digested, pacified Marx). Actually, Marx was not wise at all, busy as he was fighting battles - the only process that can generate knowledge (as Foucault established). A fight with Ricardo, and then another against Malthus, and then against Bailey, Ricardo's most dangerous adversary, in an endless chain of duels. The magisterial ability of the author to frame the duels and the issue at stake brings Marx's thinking to life. The light shone on Marx's use of Hegel in particular is breathtaking. Marx's attempt to save Ricardo's theory of value from the perils of market's randomness unfolds before our eyes. You can see Marx build a line of defence after another, shoring up the labour theory of value and protecting it from the market and the attacks of the first marginalists. Marx does the opposite of what you'd expect: rather than vilify capital - as Ricardo did with the rentiers - he breathes life into it, using all of Hegel's old-fashioned idealism to downgrade (or upgrade, in hindsight) capital from a self standing thing (something that is) to a relationship in perpetual becoming and always in need of a counterparty to lean upon. It then becomes more difficult to see through this hegelian smoke who loses and who wins, who needs whom - which is the 'particular' and which is the 'singular'.Marx engages in the fight because he sides with the workers and the misery capital accumulates to push back its own demise. The labour theory of value is the only ammunition Marx can offer them. But then how weak must a theory be that needs such a Napoleonic orchestration of armies to protect it. And there's no Lakatos - or other sophisticated theory of science - that can come to the rescue.Surprisingly, the generally most ridiculed of Marx's observations - the tendential fall of the rate of profit - is the one that emerges from the book (see the remarkable chapter six) as the most convincing. From the vantage point of the current depression, Marx's ability to explain his contemporary boom and bust cycles appears as wondrous (we are made illiterate by thirty years of Keynesian stability, followed by thirty years of wild neoliberalism, and fail to see the common features). For epistemologists.

  • Martin Empson
    2018-11-21 02:39

    This is an excellent, detailed and frequently challenging examination of Karl Marx's book Capital. Callinicos explores Marx's method both in his approach to the politics and economics of capitalism, but also his approach to the writing of Capital itself. It is not an introductory guide to Marx's Capital, but should be read by anyone trying to get to a deeper understanding Marx's approach and the importance of a revolutionary critique of capitalism in the 21st century. Alex Callinicos was interviewed about the book here.There is also a detailed review of it by Mark L Thomas here