Read The Blood Knight by Greg Keyes J. Gregory Keyes Online

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Brimming with passion and adventure, Greg Keyes's epic saga of a royal family's fall from power through treachery and dark magic, set amid the return of ancient evils whose malevolence threatens to annihilate humanity, bids fair to become a classic of its kind. Now, in the eagerly awaited third installment, Keyes draws the threads of his tapestry ever tighter, illuminatingBrimming with passion and adventure, Greg Keyes's epic saga of a royal family's fall from power through treachery and dark magic, set amid the return of ancient evils whose malevolence threatens to annihilate humanity, bids fair to become a classic of its kind. Now, in the eagerly awaited third installment, Keyes draws the threads of his tapestry ever tighter, illuminating old mysteries and introducing new ones as events build toward a shattering climax. The legendary Briar King has awakened, spreading madness and destruction. Half-remembered, poorly understood prophecies seem to point to the young princess Anne Dare, rightful heir to the throne of Crotheny, as the world's only hope. Yet Anne is hunted by the minions of the usurper Robert, whose return from the grave has opened a doorway through which sinister sorceries have poured into the world. Though Anne herself is the conduit of fearsome powers beyond her understanding and control, it is time for girl to become woman, princess to become queen. Anne must stop running and instead march at the head of an army to take back her kingdom . . . or die trying. But a mysterious assassin stalks her, so skilled in the deadly fencing style of dessrata that even Anne's friend and protector Cazio, a master of the form, cannot stand against him, nor can her sworn defender, the young knight Neil MeqVren. As for Anne's other companions-Aspar White, the royal holter who bears an enchanted arrow capable of felling the Briar King; and Stephen Darige, the monk who blew the horn that woke the Briar King from his slumber-they cannot help her, as their separate paths carry them ever deeper into a deadly maze of myth and magic from which return may be impossible. Meanwhile, Queen Muriele is a prisoner of the false king. With no allies but a crippled musician, who is himself a prisoner, and a servingwoman who is both more and less than she seems, Muriele will find herself a pawn in Robert's schemes for conquest-and a weapon to be used against her own daughter....

Title : The Blood Knight
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780345440686
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 512 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Blood Knight Reviews

  • Dirk Grobbelaar
    2019-05-18 15:03

    A word of advice: do not let too much time pass before reading each next instalment in this tetralogy. This novel opens somewhat in the thick of things, and I had to refer back to both The Charnel Prince and The Briar King to catch up on the characters and the back story. This is not a bad thing though. It is, to be honest, a quite seamless transition between novels. As the story progresses, the reader’s memory is jogged more than adequately, so no harm done.Again, I have to commend Keyes for his action sequences. Really good stuff! Anybody who has read my review of The Charnel Prince will know that I have a rather high regard for this series, and this instalment certainly didn’t disappoint. It is dark and grim and moody, for the most part, but has some sly offerings of humour as well. Something interesting was how Keyes actually altered the history of his world this time round, making much of what we learn in the earlier novels moot, as the characters become aware of hidden truths and deceptions. There are also some shocking reveals and twists to keep thing interesting.The trend of ending almost every chapter on a cliff-hanger is continued here. This makes for some pretty exciting reading. I love the pacing in these books. Keyes doesn’t allow the story to get bogged down. There is intrigue, but Keyes offsets it nicely with suspense and high drama. The creatures of his world also continue to impress. A new one is introduced here, namely the Woorm. The horde of Slinders, introduced in The Charnel Prince, is developed in much more detail here. Really, really creepy. And then, of course, there is The Kept…The elements of music and languages are explored, again, and I was impressed, again. This series is a roller coaster ride that I am thoroughly enjoying.This novel, like its predecessors, drips with atmosphere. I am looking forward to reading the closing chapter in this saga: The Born Queen.

  • Althea Ann
    2019-04-25 16:14

    This excellent fantasy series ("Kingdoms of Thorn and Bone") is veryreminiscent of George R.R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire - except thatit's actually finished! (There's one more book in the series that Ihaven't yet read.) It follows a similar format, structurally, and the'feel' of the writing is very similar. The story itself, however, isquite original - at least, more so than many fantasy epics. I mean,it's still got Dark Forces and Bold Warriors and Beautiful Queens etc,etc... but we want that, right?In the third book, The Blood Knight, the composer Leoff finds himselfentangled with the cursed and undead usurper, Robert. His only hope ofescape may be to create a composition of deadly power - music that maykill anyone who hears it performed. But what cost to his soul willwriting this music take?Meanwhile, Princess Anne is still on the run - but has begun to acceptthe prophecy that she must be Queen, and finds a new maturity andauthority that is necessary to her destiny.Anne may be the only hope the land has - because foul and deadlycreatures are seemingly multiplying, laying waste to the forest andthe lands. The Holter Aspar, Stephen, and Aspar's young villagesweetheart, Winna, are desperately seeking an answer to a dire problemthat becomes worse every day...And now, I really rather desperately need to get my hands on a copy ofthe fourth (and final) book in the series!

  • Lasairfiona Smith
    2019-04-23 16:59

    More! Must have more!It has taken three books to figure out who is the good guys and who the bad guys are. It becomes much more clear in this book but I still have a bit on uncertainty. I love how complex this is. And that twist!When my boyfriend who usually sticks to things like Kafka loves this series, you know it is a good one. Yes, the writing is a bit chopy but the story completely and utterly makes up for it. I believe I have said that before but it bears repeating.The next one doesn't come out until late March '08. I want it now. Both of us are chomping at the bit. I may actually have to order two copies so we can read it at the same time.

  • James
    2019-05-12 10:15

    This review is going to be, sad to say, basically a list of what annoyed me. The more I continue into this series the more I find small things that didn't bother me before, but do now. The series actually seems to be slowing down as I read it. The characters don't seem to be doing much until the very end of the book. When I think back on the book, almost nothing stands out to me and I literally can't say what exactly went on. There are some plot elements that are still open from the first book that I want to know more about, but the author is holding them tantalizingly close but still out of reach. He's basically forcing me to read the last book, which I will because I want to know, and I might as well now that I'm this far. Its like I have to wade through all the fluff to get just a small tidbit of what I wanted to know.Other things that started to get on my nerves were things like the author's obsession with language, which at first was kind of cool, but now it turns into characters talking endlessly about what a particular (made up) word means and how it changed through history. Kind of boring and forced. It's like the author really wants to force his love of language upon the reader.The title of the book has almost nothing to do with the content and that irked me for some reason I can't explain. There were also a slew of love interests that randomly popped up in this book. All of them, (again a common theme) seemed forced. Characters would cling to each other after only just meeting and it was clear to me that the author wanted me to believe that this was a deep and involved union.Anyways, not super interesting, though there were a few small parts I liked, but I will read the last book because I fell for the trap and want to know the ending.

  • YouKneeK
    2019-04-24 15:10

    This is the third book out of four in the Kingdoms of Thorn and Bone series and I enjoyed it a lot – about as much as I enjoyed the second book. This book felt a little more concentrated on a smaller set of story lines and characters, although that perception may be inaccurate. I think in reality it had close to the same number of characters, but fewer distinct storylines because events have begun merging together more. However, the over-all story seems to be getting progressively more intricate and interesting as it goes on and the world continues to gain more and more depth. This book explained a lot more about some aspects of the world and its inhabitants. By the end, I felt like I understood the big picture better. However, there are still lingering questions that will hopefully be answered in the fourth and final book. Some interesting events also occurred near the end, and a couple of choices were made that I’m sure will lead to more trouble. I look forward to seeing what happens in the final book, and I hope the ending will bring everything to a satisfying conclusion.

  • ShariMulluane
    2019-05-12 12:50

    I have some mixed feelings about this installment of the series. Maybe because my gut is telling me that it should all be wrapped up by now, and yet there is another book to go. More then likely it is the lack of character development, which has been replaced by plot development. Well, I am all about the characters, and this book did not feed my need so to speak. Basically, readers who are more story focused then character focused will find plenty to love here. Character focused readers might be a bit disappointed, but as I said, there is plenty of story to get you through.Full Review: [url=http://dragonsheroesandwizards.blogsp..., Heroes and Wizards[/url:]

  • Matt
    2019-05-03 15:00

    This one took me a while to read, mostly due to other distractions and I think my enjoyment of it suffered due to that.These books are clearly designed to be fast paced page-turner's based on some of the techniques used (e.g. cliff hanger chapter ends). To get most out of it I think the reader needs to reciprocate and keep up a good reading pace so that events flow smoothly towards the all action final 100 pages or so.I do enjoy the way he mirrors the reality of historical records and tradition - the way that the "real history" and the "know history" have points in common but are vastly divergent.

  • Jeff
    2019-05-15 09:59

    This was the best book of the series so far. Things are really moving along. If you are a fan of epic/heroic fantasy, you should give this series a shot. This book, as well as the final book, The Born Queen will give you your money's worth. More thoughts here

  • Megan
    2019-04-21 13:56

    It was enjoyable, but I was led to believe this series was on par with Song of Ice and Fire. That's not true, but it doesn't mean it's not worth reading, it's just very different. This probably isn't the best book in the series either, mainly because like 90% is characters just randomly getting laid out of nowhere.

  • Mark
    2019-04-26 09:50

    An excellent continuation of the series. If you like high fantasy with a dark and political bent (think Martin's Game of Thrones series), then you'll like this one even more, mainly because it's actually finished...

  • John
    2019-05-16 11:14

    A solid continuation of the series that increases the stakes as well as raises some interesting questions about good and evil. Second only to George R. R. Martin's series, this is my favorite high fantasy series.

  • Joy
    2019-04-28 09:03

    This is a very good story. Constant action, good villains, clean crisp dialog and even some laughs. The author also creates imaginative poems/songs and quotes fitting the worlds myth. Eager to get to each new book in the series.

  • Renamski
    2019-05-20 17:13

    This book begins to reveal that the line between good and evil can sometimes be blurred.

  • Dellitt
    2019-04-25 10:57

    This book is as good as The Briar King. Fantastic. I love how complex the plot is and the characters are equally intriguing.

  • Emily Jepsen
    2019-04-25 10:51

    It's good. I'm kinda done with all the gambits piling up though. There's all these mysteries, but none are being solved and it's really frustrating

  • Errolyn
    2019-05-15 09:02

    The Kingdoms of Thorn and Bone Series I am always surprised that this series does not get anymore attention, because it deserves more. I picked up the first book, The Briar King, on a whim. I was looking for something to read to pass the time and just picked it up at the bookstore because it sounded interesting. I am always looking for books that are good fantasy, but not predictable repetitive like some other fantasy books. You know, the usual young boy finds out he is special in some way; goes on epic journey, fights bad guy, and win...it can be a bit much. So this book sounded like a change and I was glad I picked it up once I got going.The first thing that stood out to me was the fact that the main protagonist is a female, and a good character at that. Once complaint I always have about fantasy books are that the females in it are always flat and one dimensional. They either are there to serve as love interest for the male character, who sit about and annoy me with their uselessness and weak personalities. Little pure princesses, that don't actually exist in real life. Or they are the evil witch who must be defeated. That whole Madonna, whore thing...but then Fantasy is mostly written by men. So I was happy to see that this series has a strong female lead character that is useful and central. Yeah in the first book she makes mistakes that make you want to smack here, but because they character is well thought out...the mistakes are understandable, and you can see growth. She learns and changes from her mistakes.Another aspect of this series I enjoy is the action. There are plenty of fighting scenes complete with blood and guts and sword fighting for those that enjoy that sort of thing. But it not only has physical action, but literary action..the book never stalls and has a great pace..that almost makes you feel like you are one this frantic journey with these people. But the series is not also without lots of plot driven action as well. The plot is complicated and thick.Which gets to the final thing I liked...the mystery of what is exactly going on. There are plots within plots, and just when you think you know what is going on, and who is behind it...another layer is peeled of and you realize that there is more going on than meets the eye. As you answer on question, two more pop up..and all evidence seems to point to this not just being a wild goose chance with no satisfying pay off at the end. It seems the writer knows where he is going and what is going to happen...that this story line will be wrapped up.But with a plot so dense, there can be time when there is confusion. There is a large group of characters and sometimes more are introduced. It is definitely a series that requires re-read before a new installment to make sure that the players and events are fresh in your mind.So, having finished the third book, The Blood Knight, I can say that this series is very good and worth the read. I have the final book, The Born Queen, and look forward to finishing this underrated series. 

  • Jimmy
    2019-04-23 10:06

    Greg Keyes is still loosing me in the story because of the language barriers, and ancient languages. If he had simply stated that the character said, whatever, in Vitellian or which ever, but wrote what the character said in English, readers like me would not be kicked out of the story. Part IV was the most powerful with the revelations and secrets of the Sefry, that I didn’t see coming.(view spoiler)[The undead Prince Robert separates Muriele from Alis, and tells her of his plan to secure “his” throne. Alis isn’t done with him yet! (hide spoiler)] Anne is determined to meet her uncle Robert Dare with her own army. She is pursued by a demon woman. Who saved her? With the help of Neil MeqVren and her Aunt Elyoner, she may succeed. (view spoiler)[Anne and Austra make amends to their relationship.(hide spoiler)]Austra’s tale of Rose, teaches Anne of the usurper Robert Dare’s evil nature. The slinders, servants to The Briar King, cover the King’s Forest like a blanket. (view spoiler)[They’ve captured Stephen, but for what purpose. Leoff’s hands are destroyed by torture. What’s his life worth, if he can not play? Mery Gramme is reunited with him. With her talents, he devises a plan for revenge. Stephen’s capture will lead him on an adventure to an unknown mountain. With the aid of Zemle and her friendship, he will learn about himself and of untrustworthy others. Aspar’s sighting of Fend throws him off track. He’ll have a very uncomfortable visit with the Sarnwood Witch, and will be given a chance to get the answers he feels that he needs from Fend.(hide spoiler)]Who will win in a fight between a woorm and the Briar King? Anne tries to take back the castle with the help of Cazio and others she has made promises to. (view spoiler)[But, will she keep her word and deliver on her promises? She and her army will go through the secret tunnels of the castle, where Anne will come face to face with the Kept, the Faiths, and Prince Robert Dare.(hide spoiler)]Will Anne make the right choices, or prove herself to be selfish and try to save them all?

  • Jimmy
    2019-05-14 16:18

    Greg Keyes is still loosing me in the story because of the language barriers, and ancient languages. If he had simply stated that the character said, whatever, in Vitellian or which ever, but wrote what the character said in English, readers like me would not be kicked out of the story. Part IV was the most powerful with the revelations and secrets of the Sefry, that I didn’t see coming.(view spoiler)[The undead Prince Robert separates Muriele from Alis, and tells her of his plan to secure “his” throne. Alis isn’t done with him yet! (hide spoiler)] Anne is determined to meet her uncle Robert Dare with her own army. She is pursued by a demon woman. Who saved her? With the help of Neil MeqVren and her Aunt Elyoner, she may succeed. (view spoiler)[Anne and Austra make amends to their relationship.(hide spoiler)]Austra’s tale of Rose, teaches Anne of the usurper Robert Dare’s evil nature. The slinders, servants to The Briar King, cover the King’s Forest like a blanket. (view spoiler)[They’ve captured Stephen, but for what purpose. Leoff’s hands are destroyed by torture. What’s his life worth, if he can not play? Mery Gramme is reunited with him. With her talents, he devises a plan for revenge. Stephen’s capture will lead him on an adventure to an unknown mountain. With the aid of Zemle and her friendship, he will learn about himself and of untrustworthy others. Aspar’s sighting of Fend throws him off track. He’ll have a very uncomfortable visit with the Sarnwood Witch, and will be given a chance to get the answers he feels that he needs from Fend.(hide spoiler)]Who will win in a fight between a woorm and the Briar King? Anne tries to take back the castle with the help of Cazio and others she has made promises to. (view spoiler)[But, will she keep her word and deliver on her promises? She and her army will go through the secret tunnels of the castle, where Anne will come face to face with the Kept, the Faiths, and Prince Robert Dare.(hide spoiler)]Will Anne make the right choices, or prove herself to be selfish and try to save them all?

  • Daniel
    2019-05-21 14:03

    For the most part, I enjoyed reading Keyes's third installment to his Kingdom of Thorn and Bone series. The mysteries that drive the plot kept me interested, and each revelation that Keyes dropped increased the scope of the story and raised the stakes for the characters. There were moments when I felt an intake of breath and marveled at the ramifications of what passed and what was said. It is this epic feel that brought me back to the genre of fantasy (as in: swords and sorcery and the like), and it was fun to experience that again.If anything held this book back, it is Keyes's reliance on an episodic structure that relies upon cliff-hanger endings. Every single chapter ends with on a note of suspense that is then prolonged until that narrative thread is picked up again a few chapters later. For some scenes this works well, and encourages interest; in other parts of the book, however, this breathless delivery undercuts any drama or introspection or pause that necessarily accompanies all of the action. Much as I enjoyed the pace of events, there were times that I wanted everything to slow down and just let the characters be for a moment - especially after some of aforementioned revelations. Wouldn't people need to dwell on what they've learned at some point, even in a time of war? According to Keyes, no, events just keep pushing people forward. Even if this is true historically, in the context of fiction it makes for narrative that can be wearisome and almost absurd. Just how much punishment can Aspar take before he sits down and says, "Sceat, I'm gonna take a bloody nap."Lack of narrative variety aside, I do look forward to the fourth and final installment, and the answers that it will bring. I can also say that I'm glad I picked this series up.

  • Peter Greenwell
    2019-04-28 13:57

    The least of the three I've read so far and rather than comment on what I liked (see my previous reviews of this series to date) I'll have a minor league rant on the things that got my goat. A whole bunch of unwelcome fantasy (and literature) tropes are starting to creep into this series. Absurd personal relationships being the big one. What is it with fantasy novels and this? It's almost as if the presence of dragons, necromancers and magic warps people's romantic emotions...much of the boy-girl stuff is nothing short of surreal. A lot of the feelings some characters have for others are borderline sociopathic. Bizarre, illogical jealousies and so on. Then there's the need to end every chapter with a cliffhanger. Other reviewers here have lamented that Keyes overdoes the language thing, but I like that. Languages are the core of any myth and legend, and it shows a bit extra attention to detail. What else? The book's title has negligible relevance to anything in the book. There's no depth to the bad guys. They're inviolate and immutable card carrying members of the Bad Guys Union and no argument will be entered into. Come off it, it would've been great to see things from their PoV just once...There's a lot of padding too. Much of the time the protagonists are running to and fro for no real purpose to add filler to the book, to make it extend into a fourth tome. Yeah, that's par for the course in these sorts of books too.It's all a big plug for "you must read the last book!" Guess what, it worked...

  • Mike
    2019-05-15 14:00

    To save time I'm reviewing the series rather than the individual books.I enjoyed The Kingdom of Thorn and Bone, but I did have some issues. For one thing, it's quite a bit darker than the fantasy books I usually enjoy -- more in the vein of "grimdark" fantasy, though perhaps not as much as George R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire, which it slightly predates. The series also had a bit more torture, murder, sex, and sensuality than I would normally choose (the sex is not explicit, but the torture sometimes is!).For another, it feels like you never really know what's going on. This is, I'm sure, intentional -- and in fact the end of the series turns a lot of plot lines and past "truths" on their heads -- however it made the first two and a half books feel a little aimless at times. There really isn't any clear or coherent goal for the characters until part way through the third book, and I seem to prefer a plot with a bit more of a clear "quest" so to speak.As for the ending, it seemed a bit abrupt when it finally did come -- and I'm somewhat particular that if I'm going to read a long series, the ending has to be satisfactory (not too abrupt or unbelievable).So I'm giving the series three stars, though that's perhaps a little harsh. I'm not likely to read it again, and I'm not sure when/if I would recommend it to others, but I did enjoy it and get drawn along through the ~2,500 pages.

  • Brian
    2019-04-22 10:11

    Book: 8/10 - 3/5/11Series: 5/10 - 3/21/11This is another series that started out well but ended terribly. The first two books were excellent - great fantasy with interesting and detailed characters; a good plot with an interesting world with a big back story. It kind of reminded me of A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin, but focusing on fewer characters with a less intricate plot. The third book was still solid, but there was less character and plot development...still interesting and readable though. The fourth and final book took a complete left turn and ticked me off. The characters completely changed their personalities, devolving into shallow facades of their earlier selves with a lot immature unlikable features. It kind of appeared like a shallow and lazy way for the author to say that power corrupts, but was not believable at all. The plot became a jumbled inconsistent mess with not a lot of tie in to the earlier books. There were tons of pseudo cliffhangers with implausible last minute rescues and silly romantic sub-plots. The ending was a complete cop-out to try to make everything (almost) rosy. It was a sad ending to a very promising series and left a bad taste in my mouth. I would not recommend it, unless you skip the final book.

  • Geoff
    2019-04-30 14:10

    The third book of this series follows the formula of the others, it builds up to a grand climax, and leaves us hanging for answers. One thing that I noticed is Greg is not very good at, is describing battle scenes. Battles were sectioned into very small parts, and left the reader wanting more description (at least i did). And one thing that Greg does well, is create believable characters, which are described in great detail. This is Greg's strong point, and makes the reader cheer and have feelings for the characters. Which, as a result, makes this a pretty good fantasy series. it's not excellent, but it is pretty good. I'm eager for the final volume, which comes next year.My only complaint, is Greg refuses to kill off major characters. There were ample opportunities in this book, but he refused to disappoint the readers. Which means he refused to take chances. But this story is still adult fantasy, and there are plenty of killings, but they just occur to smaller players in the story. But Greg is not the first to do this, in fact most authors follow this formula, and I just have to deal with it.

  • Joy Wilson
    2019-05-13 16:59

    This series just keeps enthralling me!Where to begin? First of all, I hate to keep reading because then the series will be over; however, I must keep reading because I am totally captivated by this work of fiction. Greg Keyes, I can't believe I haven't read your work before, it is truly wonderful. The characters are rich and deep, they do some things true to archetypes, but they also do the unexpected. Yes, they live when they should die, but isn't that the point. Heroes are supposed to survive even if they shouldn't. And what a cast of heroes and villains here. I really was thrown for a loop at the end of this novel, what is the big lurking secret about this world that I can feel but can't quite reason out yet? The pacing is perfect and I love the language. When you say the names out loud, you get such a musical tone, and although difficult to read are true to the text. Can't wait and yet hate to read the last book because then it is over, but this has been one of my most favorite reads in fantasy in a long time!

  • by Ax
    2019-05-14 11:10

    Verso la fineQuesto terzo volume di Keyes cresce in intensità (rispetto ai romanzi precedenti) grazie a una maggiore propensione all'uso di colori scuri nelle emozioni dei personaggi, così come nel tocco visionario di alcune situazioni in grado di elevare le vicende al di sopra di una linearità di fondo che, seppur capace di tenermi incollato alle pagine (e con gusto!), non mi ha mai dato un reale senso di meraviglia; rimango dell'idea che l'autore debba osare di più.In conclusione, questa trilogia — almeno fino ad oggi, visto che è in cantiere un ultimo e conclusivo capitolo — ha spunti interessanti legati alle forze messe in campo, una trama articolata ma scorrevole, e la capacità di catturare il lettore; mi è capitato spesso di continuare a leggere per sapere cosa sarebbe successo nel capitolo successivo. Indubbiamente una bella sensazione.

  • Quadragon27
    2019-04-26 11:10

    It took me a long time to get through this one because I've been so busy, which is a shame because there was so much going on that I feel like I probably missed some of the flavor of the book. It's also been a while since I read the first two books in the series, so there were some details I had trouble remembering. However, despite that this was a pretty good read. Keyes does a good job of giving his world some unique flair through his use of language and mythology. What's more, there are several instances where it really isn't clear who the "bad guys" are, which makes this feel more realistic than your average end of the world drama. And the point of view characters are all pretty decent - there's nobody who I feel especially taken with, but there also aren't any who I absolutely can't stand, which is always a nice quality. Will definitely read the next one in the series.

  • Solace Winter
    2019-05-20 14:00

    Book three gave me more hope for Aspar as a character. I spent a lot of book two wondering why this story was even prevalent in the plot, as the kingdom storyline took hold, and found in book three the stories all melded together much better. I can't help but feel sorry for Winna again in this story as she seems very easily brushed aside and like a character who never really could come into her own because she was never given the chance.That being said, we still have Neil, Anne, and Cazio who continue to fight for the kingdom and against the army that stands before them. This novel concludes this story arc perfectly and leads us into the finality. I'm curious how they will bring the two conflicting stories together and if everyone is going to survive.

  • Esther
    2019-05-02 11:15

    The story continues...And I am seriously enjoying this series. The pacing is great with each chapter ending on an almost-cliffhanger without the repeated trick feeling "cheap" as it does when so many other authors do it. The characters are complex and varied - you understand why each is making the decisions they are, while simultaneously realising they are not headed in the same direction. The world-building is awesome with layer after layer of complexity. None of the "reveals" feel "cheap and nasty". They all make sense while being true revelations. I really don't know where the series is going to end, but I am loving the ride. (I also like that all the books are about the same length. It feels like the author has the whole thing under tight control).

  • Robert Negut
    2019-04-22 12:10

    The story continues, though it may seem a little too fragmented at times. The deeper plot is still very obviously there for anyone who is interested in it and I really want to know how it will all turn out in the end. I must note that the beauty of the world is seriously lessened, though that is perfectly normal considering what's going on.One real complaint I have is the fact that basically every chapter ends with a cliffhanger, which makes it feel more like a writing exercise at times. But the moments when there's a break in the action in order to make room for character development are quite brilliant.

  • Ubersmaug
    2019-05-14 11:53

    Still enjoying this series, with it's new revelations about all the bizarro prophecies that may or may not be true or even translated correctly, and there are new, even weirder magic bits (looking at you, woorm!). It is both frustrating and awesome that each chapter ends in sort of a cliffhanger, which doesn't get resolved until you've gone through the stories of three more people. It does propel the story along faster that way, though, or else it just makes me read faster so I can find out what the hell is happening. Also... the music and literature part of the series is quite awesome. Very well done.