Read Habeas Viscus: Racializing Assemblages, Biopolitics, and Black Feminist Theories of the Human by Alexander G. Weheliye Online

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Habeas Viscus focuses attention on the centrality of race to notions of the human. Alexander G. Weheliye develops a theory of "racializing assemblages," taking race as a set of sociopolitical processes that discipline humanity into full humans, not-quite-humans, and nonhumans. This disciplining, while not biological per se, frequently depends on anchoring political hierarcHabeas Viscus focuses attention on the centrality of race to notions of the human. Alexander G. Weheliye develops a theory of "racializing assemblages," taking race as a set of sociopolitical processes that discipline humanity into full humans, not-quite-humans, and nonhumans. This disciplining, while not biological per se, frequently depends on anchoring political hierarchies in human flesh. The work of the black feminist scholars Hortense Spillers and Sylvia Wynter is vital to Weheliye's argument. Particularly significant are their contributions to the intellectual project of black studies vis-à-vis racialization and the category of the human in western modernity. Wynter and Spillers configure black studies as an endeavor to disrupt the governing conception of humanity as synonymous with white, western Man. Weheliye posits black feminist theories of modern humanity as useful correctives to the "bare life and biopolitics discourse" exemplified by the works of Giorgio Agamben and Michel Foucault, which, Weheliye contends, vastly underestimate the conceptual and political significance of race in constructions of the human. Habeas Viscus reveals the pressing need to make the insights of black studies and black feminism foundational to the study of modern humanity....

Title : Habeas Viscus: Racializing Assemblages, Biopolitics, and Black Feminist Theories of the Human
Author :
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ISBN : 9780822357018
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 224 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Habeas Viscus: Racializing Assemblages, Biopolitics, and Black Feminist Theories of the Human Reviews

  • Ralowe Ampu
    2019-03-29 15:36

    does the stuff it says it's going to do on the back cover, the second half focuses more on the shortcomings in agamben's usage of schmitt, the sovereign fantasies that black feminism cannot abide. black feminism operative in the scene of subjection moten and hartman rankle with, a nonsovereign place or zone of indistinction where body and flesh can get confused, and all of what's potentially agentive in that confusion. the book is a continual meditation on what's productive in considering the aunt hester shriek scene, producing pornotropes for good or ill, a black understanding well understood before foucault thank you very much. "produce the flesh" is an injunction that moten might term jurisgenerative for those not eligible for humanity. i stumble on weheliye's usage of the "human," but maybe sylvia winter, whose book i'm waiting to get, offers redemption for the "human." i roll with "personhood" personally. this makes me want to read donna haraway!

  • yarrow
    2019-04-07 10:22

    One of the most brilliant books I've read all year. Weheliye makes it clear in the introduction that he is out for blood, and pulls no punches. The book is best when he is checking Foucault and Agamben and subjecting them to black feminist critique. Particularly compelling is his expose of Agamben's efforts to systematize Benjamin as a Schmittian. Also when he shows Foucault's indebtedness to George Jackson. Dense, but can't recommend highly enough for those who are already reading continental theory and black feminism.

  • Quin Rich
    2019-04-09 15:34

    Challenging but brilliant critique of biopolitics/bare life discourses, as well as an affirmation of modes of life outside the "genre of Man." Emphasizes the ontological relationality of humanity over and against comparison and calcuability as modes of interpreting different forms of domination. I'm still chewing it over!

  • Tomás Narvaja
    2019-04-06 16:08

    Great discussion of the work of Hortense Spillers, Sylvia Winter, Michel Foucault, and Giorgio Agamben. Very contemporary discussion as to the value of black studies, the importance of its object of knowledge, and the relationships between systems of oppression, Man, the body, and flesh. Uses a lot of jargon that could require a slower reading for less-familiar readers. Definitely a must read for anyone who's work involves discussions of biopolitics or bare life.

  • Anthie
    2019-03-30 11:31

    A must-read for anyone interested in the humanities!

  • Ai Miller
    2019-03-30 10:27

    A really solid examination and troubling of biopolitics and racialization. It can be rough to get into at first, but once you get going, it gets easier and easier to read, and by the end you're really invested. The last chapter in particular is really good in terms of thinking about what it might mean to consider a futurity outside of the western Man. I really loved chapter 5 ("Law") as well, for its examination of how documented "wounding" may be necessary for full personhood. It may really help you to have reader Hortense Spillers and Sylvia Wynter before you read this, but it's not necessary by any stretch. A really good book overall,and one I'm glad to have read.

  • Ayanna Dozier
    2019-04-02 16:11

    This book is so necessary, it provides a self-determined framework of viewing black ontology. Weheliye excavates the work of Sylvia Wynter (an Afro-cuban theorist whose writings have been neglected by institution) as a way of situating blackness and black studies in society. Weheliye's call for self-determination and promises of afro-futurism through the racial assemblages of body and life and inspiring and offers an innovative way of re-framing Black studies in and outside of the academy.

  • Zach Irvin
    2019-04-11 12:18

    "Rather, habeas viscus points to the terrain of humanity as a relational assemblage exterior to the jurisdiction of law given that the law can bequeath or rescind ownership of the body so that it becomes the property of proper persons but does not possess the authority to nullify the politics and poetics of the flesh found in the traditions of the oppressed." (136-7)

  • Myriam
    2019-04-13 16:23

    Hands down the best academic book I have read in a while - highly theoretical, addressing issues of racialized identities and their marginalizations through the theoretical principles advanced by Black Feminist theorists such as Hortense Spillers and Sylvia Wynter. Very well written with a touch of hip-hop humor.

  • Amanda
    2019-03-25 14:12

    For those of you who work on social justice issues and issues of modern definitions of humanity, I highly recommend Alexander Weheliye's Habeas Viscus. I really appreciate the depth of theoretical engagement and the cultural critique. (If I can manage a more in depth review I will at some point)

  • Mills College Library
    2019-04-14 16:10

    305.4201 W413 2014

  • Decolonize D Native
    2019-04-06 08:08

    rocked my world

  • and
    2019-04-11 08:35

    a good counterpart for anybody who feels devastated after reading wilderson.