Read The Gothic King: A Biography of Henry III by John Paul Davis Online

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The first biography in many years of Henry IIIThe son and successor of Bad King John, Henry III reigned for 56 years from 1216, the first child king in England for 200 years. England went on to prosper during his reign and his greatest monument is Westminster Abbey, which he made the seat of his government—indeed, Henry III was the first English King to call a parliament.The first biography in many years of Henry IIIThe son and successor of Bad King John, Henry III reigned for 56 years from 1216, the first child king in England for 200 years. England went on to prosper during his reign and his greatest monument is Westminster Abbey, which he made the seat of his government—indeed, Henry III was the first English King to call a parliament. Though often overlooked by historians, Henry III was a unique figure coming out of a chivalric yet Gothic era: a compulsive builder of daunting castles and epic sepulchres; a powerful, unyielding monarch who faced down the De Montfort rebellion and waged war with Wales and France; and, much more than his father, Henry was the king who really hammered out the terms of the Magna Carta with the barons. John Paul Davis brings all his forensic skills and insights to the grand story of the Gothic King in this, the only biography in print of a most remarkable monarch....

Title : The Gothic King: A Biography of Henry III
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ISBN : 21104171
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 240 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Gothic King: A Biography of Henry III Reviews

  • Sarah u
    2018-11-17 01:02

    Over the past few years, I have read plenty of books and articles about King Henry III of England, the people around him and the time he lived in, especially those that discuss the period of the Second Barons’ Wars. The time is fascinating to me, and I cannot get enough of it. I often thought to myself what a shame it is- was- that no chronological narrative of Henry’s reign had been written by a modern author. For all the masses of analysis and contextualisation there is, there was nothing that just told us what happened in the right order.Well, no more, readers! Last August a book titled The Gothic King suddenly appeared in my amazon recommendations, penned by historical biographer John Paul Davis. Here it was, at last, the book the life and study of Henry III needed. I immediately pre-ordered, then waited extremely patiently for a little over nine months for it to arrive.Was it worth the wait? Absolutely. At just over 260 pages long, this is the life of Henry, in order, in a nutshell. Davis has engaged with his subject well, researching thoroughly using both primary source material and the work of recent scholars. In the introduction to the book it is made clear that the book is intended to put things in order rather than analyse in depth, which makes the book clear, concise and very easy to read. Many of the author’s points are referenced, and the end notes and bibliography are well presented. HenryIIIjpdGiven the fifty six years Henry was king and the intention of the book to remain readable, many of the events are recounted with the finer points missing. Though this on a few occasions made me look twice, I can understand the need to omit some detail on account of the length of the text and the fact that someone new to Henry’s reign is likely to pick this book up (I hope they do!). Davis himself states in the prelude that his book “could have been at least ten times longer than it is“- how daunting that would be for a newcomer to the period! The main objective of the book, to present the reign of Henry III in the most straightforward way possible, was achieved excellently. The critical analysis in the final chapter works really well, and I have to say that chapter 11- ‘Henry the Builder’- was a personal highlight of the book.Overall thoughts? Excellent writing, a clear concise account of what happened and when, some lovely plates of photography in the centre, short, easy to digest, fun and not overwhelming. An excellent addition to any medieval bookshelf.

  • Richard Brandy
    2018-11-21 19:33

    I decided to read this book purely via an interest in Edward I, to get more of an impression of what his younger days might have been like. However, I came to be very interested in Henry III in the process and actually find him to be one of the few Plantagenet kings that I think I might actually like as a person.He was compassionate towards the suffering of the poor and eager to enrich England's landscape with cathedrals and churches, from which many towns still benefit today. Henry is a king I had genuine empathy for, when hearing about how he came into his role at only nine years of age, at a time when the country looked set for takeover or civil conflict. The fact that he had such a long reign that left England in a stronger place, Davis argues, should counter many of the criticisms that he was a weak king because Simon De Montfort was able to usurp the throne.Henry's reign is perhaps sandwiched between more interesting periods of history, however, it is not dull. If, like me, you enjoy learning about English kings that are the least trendiest among scholars, then you will find this book very enriching. Davis has an engaging hand and does not shy away from exploring the more strange and peculiar events of the time.

  • Neeuqdrazil
    2018-11-30 18:37

    This was not awesome. The life of Henry III is presented firmly chronologically, and I find that this sort of life benefits from being presented, if not thematically instead of chronologically, then at least using a combination of the two. (There is one chapter covering "The Builder King" which is thematic rather than chronological.)There was also a lot of referring to people by their first names (Edward, Richard, Edmund) instead of title - in periods like this, where every second person was a William, every third was a Richard, and every fourth an Edward, and especially when father and son have the same name (see William Marshal and William Marshal the younger), this type of reference gets very confusing. I didn't feel like I learned much from this. It wasn't bad, exactly, just not great.

  • Kathryn
    2018-11-24 18:57

    I liked this book, but I didn't love it. I felt that Davis spent too much time talking about battles and not enough time talking about Henry III's personality. I loved the last chapter where, in wrapping everything up, Davis mentioned that Henry III ordered a pet for his ill child and very much loved his wife. That seems to be a very rare occurrence for a king.

  • Blair Hodgkinson
    2018-12-13 19:34

    Very neat introduction to the reign of Henry III, covering the personality and the reign. Overall, well-written, informative, and enjoyable.