Read Night of the White Buffalo by Margaret Coel Online

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With her gritty mysteries steeped in authentic Native American culture, New York Times bestselling author Margaret Coel is “widely considered the most accomplished heir to Tony Hillerman’s legacy,” (Scripps Howard News Service). In the latest Wind River novel, Arapaho attorney Vicky Holden and Father John O’Malley confront a ruthless killer in the wake of a miraculous evenWith her gritty mysteries steeped in authentic Native American culture, New York Times bestselling author Margaret Coel is “widely considered the most accomplished heir to Tony Hillerman’s legacy,” (Scripps Howard News Service). In the latest Wind River novel, Arapaho attorney Vicky Holden and Father John O’Malley confront a ruthless killer in the wake of a miraculous event.      A mysterious penitent confesses to murder, and then flees the confessional before Father John can identify him. Two months later, Vicky discovers rancher Dennis Carey shot dead in his truck along Blue Sky Highway. With the tragic news comes the exposure of an astonishing secret: the most sacred creature in Native American mythology, a white buffalo calf, was recently born on Carey’s ranch. Making national headlines, the miraculous animal draws a flood of pilgrims to the reservation, frustrating an already difficult investigation. As visitors throw the reservation into turmoil, Vicky and Father John try to unravel the strange events surrounding both Carey’s murder and the recent disappearances of three cowboys from his ranch. It could be coincidence, given the nomadic life of the cowboy trade, but when one of them fails to appear in court to testify on an assault charge, Vicky wonders if Arnie Walkfast and his Arapaho buddies are guilty of more than just assault. And at the back of Father John’s mind is the voice from the man in the confessional: I killed a man… ...

Title : Night of the White Buffalo
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780425264652
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 304 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Night of the White Buffalo Reviews

  • High Plains Library District
    2019-03-09 05:13

    I’ll admit it, I was a Nancy Drew fan as a kid. Oh, there was an occasional Trixie Belden and Encyclopedia Brown, but Nancy got most of my attention once school was out. Fast forward a few decades and I still find myself wanting to read a mystery or two (or five) at the start of the summer.This year, Margaret Coel’s stories—reminiscent of Tony Hillerman’s body of work—filled the longing for a light but interesting mystery series. Her latest,Night of the White Buffalo: Wind River Reservation Mystery, Book 18 , hit the spot on a rainy weekend. It was the familiar characters, Boston-born Father John O’Malley and Arapaho lawyer Vicky Holden, however, who held my attention. Giving a nod to a fellow regional mystery writer, Coel opens the book with Father John reading a Craig Johnson story as he whiles away a quiet, hot summer afternoon in the confessional at the mission church (on the Wind River reservation in Wyoming), awaiting visitors. He finally hears one confession, that of a murder, but he is stymied in his attempt to identify either victim or perpetrator. The plot of the story was okay, but lacked the usual ethnographic depth of Coel’s works, particularly the most recent books that have explored the Arapaho’s interaction with historical figures such as Buffalo Bill Cody and General George Armstrong Custer. The “who dunnit” component of the story wasn’t much of a mystery either; that was pretty clear a few chapters into the story. The bigger mystery is what Coel has in store for O’Malley and Holden. She liberally sprinkled “clues” throughout the story, particularly in the closing paragraphs, setting the stage for some sort of reveal in her next book, The Man Who Fell from the Sky, due out in September, 2015. Hmmm, maybe Coel also read a few Nancy Drews along the way.Need something to get you through our monsoon-like weekends? Pick up any of Coel’s Wind River Reservation mysteries or her equally appealing Catherine McLeod stories set in Denver. There are only two of the McLeod stories, but along with a fast-paced urban mystery, Coel (a historian by training), sheds some light on the history of the Arapaho in Colorado before they were forced onto the reservation at the end of the 19th century. School may be out for the summer, but with a volume or two of Coel’s mysteries at hand, you can keep learning while indulging in purely pleasurable reading at the same time.-Cindy

  • Shirley Schwartz
    2019-03-14 03:04

    What does the birth of a beautiful white buffalo calf mean to the people of Windy River Reservation? Another story in the Father John O'Malley and Vicki Holden series. What I absolutely love about this series (besides the wonderful main characters) is the Arapaho folklore and culture that are in every book in abundance. Ms. Coel always blends these traditions so well in her stories that they are like the string that ties everything together She always blends past and present into her books as well, and she does this so seamlessly that they always appear relevant for the modern setting of these books. All this, and usually a pretty good mystery is in there for all of us to enjoy as well. This story begin when Father John is faced with a troubled cowboy in his confessional one morning. The man is clearly uneasy and upset and before he abruptly leaves he tells Father Brown in the confessional that has murdered, but only because he had to. Then he disappears. Father Brown does not recognize the man, but his confession haunts him. A very blessed event occurs on a local buffalo ranch at the same time as all these mysterious happenings. A pure white buffalo calf is born on the Broken Buffalo Ranch. A white buffalo calf is a very sacred occurrence in Indian folklore. Shortly after this blessed event mysterious things start happening on the Wind River Reservation. White cowboys are being shot at while driving on the roads, cowboys are disappearing and a local rancher is found shot to death in his truck on the side of the road. Father John and Vicki know that all of these mysterious occurrences are connected and they set out to find out what is going on before more people are killed. This crime-fighting team (Father John and Vicki Holden) is one of the most unique in the mystery genre. These books are wonderful mysteries and I look forward to them.

  • Linda Branich
    2019-02-20 03:54

    If you enjoy Tony Hillermaan or William Kent Krueger, you will enjoy this book. It is not the first in the series, but like Krueger, the author cleverly fills the reader in on important past details so that no understanding of events or people from earlier books is lost.The setting is mostly on or near the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. The main characters, a Jesuit Mission priest and a divorced, middle-aged Arapaho female attorney become an unlikely team caught up in missing persons and murder in the aftermath of the rare birth of a white buffalo calf , sacred to all Native Americans. Adding to this unusual birth is the fact that it happened on a reach owned by white people, but located on the Rez.Coel weaves the past with the present, throws in a hefty dose of Native lore, stories, customs, and history, in addition to tidbits about the mission and law that kept this reader turning page after page. The book progressed much the same way a fine French pastry chef carefully adds ingredients in a particular order in precise amounts to create his final mouth-watering dessert: delicious, satisfying, and leading the diner to crave more.I will definitely check out her other books.

  • Sallee
    2019-02-22 03:58

    Night of the White Buffalo is another of author's Margaret Coel's Wind River mystery series. Crisply written with a great plot and wonderful descriptive writing she brings to life the story of the white buffalo, revered by Native Americans and many others. I learned that a white buffalo changes color in a year or two to black then brown and then red with the possibility of turning white again but always remaining sacred. The author is able to bring the joys and sorrows of the reservation Arapaho to light with a great murder story entwined. A great read.

  • Courtney Miller
    2019-03-21 08:58

    I always enjoy reading Margaret Coel's Wind River series of mysteries. I look forward to following Vicki Holden and Father O'Malley as they solve crime while wrestling their unrequited attraction to each other. I especially enjoyed Coel's handling of the white buffalo phenomenon and was inspired to write a series on the subject for Native American Antiquity (www.CourtneyMillerAuthor.com).

  • Steven Howes
    2019-03-22 03:08

    Another good offering in the author's Wind River Mystery Series. Familiar characters in a well-conceived plot in a beautiful setting make for an enjoyable read in my opinion. I am already looking forward to the next installment.

  • Carol Stanley-Snow
    2019-02-22 05:59

    WOW!!! First time reading Ms. Coel......won't be my last!! The white buffalo is rare and sacred to my people. When one is born on the Wind River rez, all heck is broken loose!!Good fotune mixed with horrors of murder.Enjoyed so much I checked 4 more out from the library!!!

  • Carolyn
    2019-03-17 03:54

    Great series - heard her speak again this year and adds more meaning to the mysteries.

  • Jan
    2019-03-04 08:09

    A mysterious penitent confesses to murder, and then flees the confessional before Father John can identify him. Two months later, Vicky discovers rancher Dennis Carey shot dead in his truck along Blue Sky Highway. With the tragic news comes the exposure of an astonishing secret: the most sacred creature in Native American mythology, a white buffalo calf, was recently born on Carey’s ranch.Making national headlines, the miraculous animal draws a flood of pilgrims to the reservation, frustrating an already difficult investigation. As visitors throw the reservation into turmoil, Vicky and Father John try to unravel the strange events surrounding both Carey’s murder and the recent disappearances of three cowboys from his ranch.It could be coincidence, given the nomadic life of the cowboy trade, but when one of them fails to appear in court to testify on an assault charge, Vicky wonders if Arnie Walkfast and his Arapaho buddies are guilty of more than just assault. And at the back of Father John’s mind is the voice from the man in the confessional: I killed a man…

  • Alfred
    2019-03-16 10:14

    This is the second of the Wind River Mysteries I have read. I found the characters of Fr. John and attorney Vicky Holden authentic and real. The book begin with Fr. John hearing a man's (he thinks) confession. The confession is simple "I committed murder." Then we switch to the birth of a white buffalo calf on a ranch on the rez.. But cowboys have gone missing and Fr John and Vicky Holden must find out why.I loved the characters and rooted for them all the way through the twisted plot.

  • Rick
    2019-03-21 02:58

    Does the appearance of a white buffalo have anything to do with the mysterious shootings in Wyoming? Why is there tension between ranch hands and Native Americans in this wild country? Coel writes a super mystery.

  • Cyn Mcdonald
    2019-02-19 08:00

    This one was okay, but a lot of sadness. I can't say I figured out whodunnit much before the reveal, but it certainly wasn't a surprise. Vicky remains Vicky, wanting to help those who need it even if they are far from perfect. There really is a white buffalo calf.

  • Helen
    2019-03-03 06:03

    Taut and well crafted mystery with a good resolution to one of the ongoing emotional issues in the series.

  • Melinda
    2019-03-02 05:59

    Enjoyable next book in the series. I've enjoyed reading them so far and will continue to do so.

  • B. Shaun Smith
    2019-03-11 09:57

    Was an ok read. Could see where it was heading.

  • Shawn
    2019-03-17 02:00

    Solid mystery/suspense fiction. Got better as it went along.

  • Sharon Mensing
    2019-02-28 09:07

    Several cowboys have gone missing after working on a buffalo ranch in Wyoming, there have been apparently random shootings of trucks, a buffalo rancher has been murdered, and all this has taken place in an atmosphere of unease between the Arapaho natives on the reservation and the white cowboys on the ranch in its midst. Vicky Holden, the Arapaho lawyer who is one of the series leads, becomes involved as a "Rap" she is defending for assault on one of the missing cowboys is released to rehab, and Father John O'Malley, the other series lead, joins her in the search for the missing cowboys when someone shows up in his confessional to say only, "I killed a man." The tension between the Arapahos and whites is palpable in this book. The buffalo ranch that is owned by the murdered white rancher and his wife is surrounded by the reservation. The local Arapaho cowboys are desperate for the work, but the rancher and now his widow will hire only white cowboys who have no ties to the area. Into this already stressed environment, a white buffalo calf is born on the ranch. White buffalos signify divinity and hope, and the ranch is further challenged by the thousands of pilgrims who arrive at the remote location to see the white buffalo. Vicky and Father John's investigation into where the missing cowboys have gone is joined by a Colorado cowboy looking for his buddy, another cowboy who seems to have disappeared from the ranch. It's not clear whether the cowboys are victims of foul play, or whether they have just moved on to another remote ranch somewhere else in the west. Clues to their whereabouts emerge as the rancher's widow tries to hide them. In the end, the plot resolution seemed just a tad far-fetched to me, but it was internally consistent with the events leading up to it. Coel's handling of the conflict between native and white cowboys, as well as the sense of awe that the white buffalo calf inspired, was very well done. The lack of clarity on both Vicky's and Father John's part about whether there was even a mystery to investigate was also well written. The sense of isolation on the ranch, exacerbated by constant money worries, ran through the book creating a unique and specific atmosphere. Coel does a terrific job of bringing the area to life, so that I almost felt I had visited the ranch after having read the book. This is the 18th book in the series featuring Vicky Holden and Father John O'Malley. While there are relationships that have built over time and are further explored in NIGHT OF THE WHITE BUFFALO, the book works well as a standalone or as a point to jump into the series and work your way back.This review first appeared at www.reviewingtheevidence.com.

  • OpenBookSociety.com
    2019-02-20 08:03

    http://openbooksociety.com/article/ni...Brought to you by OBS reviewer KaytNight of the White Buffalo is a thrilling mystery set in and around the Arapaho Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. Father John Aloysius O’Malley is still haunted by the mysterious cowboy who confessed to killing a man months earlier. He checked and never found anyone murdered. When a cowboy is shot and killed several months afterwards he does not immediately see a connection.Vickie Holden, an Arapaho lawyer and her “friend” Adam Lone Eagle, a Lakota lawyer, come upon the scene of Dennis Carey shot dead in his truck. As the murder investigation unfolds, Father O’Malley and Vickie are drawn into an even bigger mystery and more murders. At the same time a blessing has been born in the form of a sacred white buffalo on the Carey ranch.Ms Coel writes with what seems to be an inside knowledge of the Native American ways. I have not read any of her other books in this series. I do not think you need to in order to enjoy this one. The characters are thoughtfully developed. Their way of life is foreign to me, yet I can understand and imagine it through Ms Coel’s wonderful and descriptive writing style. This is an engaging thriller filled with Native American lore, ideals and beliefs, as well as the lifestyles of the nomadic cowboyers.This book is enjoyable and intriguing. I would recommend it to readers of any thrillers, those interested in Native American life and anyone that enjoys a good mystery full of cowboys. The inclusion of the sacred white buffalo’s birth brought another layer to this mystery. The way the different groups of the community reacted is quite interesting. Even though this is not really my favorite type of mystery, I thoroughly enjoyed it and am sure most other will as well.*OBS would like to thank the publisher for supplying a free copy of this title in exchange for an honest review*

  • Ed
    2019-03-01 06:52

    #18 in the Wind River series. The story revolves around the birth of a white buffalo calf on a ranch on the Wyoming's Wind River Reservation. Fr. John O'Malley, pastor of the St. Francis mission on the rez, has had a mystery man confess committing murder to him in confession, an Irish girl seeking her missing cowboy fiancé and a Colorado cowboy looking for his missing cowboy buddy. Both cowboys were supposed to be employed on the buffalo ranch where the owner claims not to have heard of them. Vicky Holden, Arapaho attorney, gets charges of assault against her client reduced when the victim can't be found. He was also supposed to work at the buffalo ranch. The murders of the ranch owner and the owner of a cowboy employment agency as well as seemingly random shootings at pickups on the highway add to the violent mix.Wind River series - Arapaho attorney Vicky Holden and Father John O'Malley confront a ruthless killer in the wake of a miraculous event. A mysterious penitent confesses to murder, and then flees the confessional before Father John can identify him. Two months later, Vicky discovers rancher Dennis Carey shot dead in his truck along Blue Sky Highway. With the tragic news comes the exposure of an astonishing secret: the most sacred creature in Native American mythology, a white buffalo calf, was recently born on Carey's ranch. Making national headlines, the miraculous animal draws a flood of pilgrims to the reservation, frustrating an already difficult investigation. As visitors throw the reservation into turmoil, Vicky and Father John try to unravel the strange events surrounding both Carey's murder and the recent disappearances of three cowboys from his ranch. It could be coincidence, given the nomadic life of the cowboy trade, but when one of them fails to appear in court to testify on an assault charge, Vicky wonders if Arnie Walksfast and his Arapaho buddies are guilty of more than just assault. And at the back of Father John's mind is the voice from the man in the confessional: "I killed a man" .

  • Gloria Feit
    2019-03-08 10:09

    The creator moves in mysterious ways in this Vicki Holden/Father John O’Malley novel, which begins with an unknown person confessing to a murder in the Confessional booth and soon thereafter Vicki finding a rancher shot in the head in his truck on the side of a road. Further mysteries crop up in the form of missing ranch hands from the murdered man’s buffalo breeding ranch. A more astonishing event at the ranch is the birth of a rare white buffalo, considered a sacred creature by the Arapaho and other Native Americans as a message from the creator.Intertwined with all this activity, of course, is Vicki’s law practice in which she is currently defending a client involved in an assault case who she suspects may be in some way responsible for rifle shots on several pickups intended to scare non-native cowboys away so jobs would become available for Arapahos. The Wind River series is replete with sensitivity toward the Arapaho people and their way of life. This is especially obvious with the legend of the white buffalo. Vicki is a sympathetic character made more poignant with her somewhat ambiguous relationship with her lover, a high-powered lawyer more accustomed to dealing with oil and gas corporations on behalf of Native American tribes than Vicki’s low-end clients needing wills, defense for minor crimes and the like. The novels in the series are always interesting and easy to read, and are recommended.

  • Sherrie
    2019-03-09 10:01

    This book is a new author for me. I really enjoyed reading this book. I've always been fascinated by the Native American and their culture. My Grandmother told me that we were descendants of The Cheyenne, but she never told me anything else. I've researched but have never found and history. This book has Father John and and Vicky searching for answers to questions they have. And to make matters even worse, the influx of all the people coming to see the baby white buffalo, which is a sacred animal to the tribes of the Native American. One man has come searching for his friend and they keep telling him he never worked at Broken Buffalo Ranch. Another man who doesn't show up for a trial, just seems to have disappeared of the face of the earth. Then Father John and Vicky start investigating and find there are 6 cowboys missing that worked on the ranch. All their investigating turns up some mystery's they can't explain. Who is the mysterious confessor of murder at Father John's church? Will they find out? And what happened to the missing cowboys? Read the book, it's really good. I really liked this author and it's also a series book, which I've started on book 18, but this book is good as a stand alone. If you like a good murder mystery, this one is really good!

  • Chris Demer
    2019-03-22 02:01

    I enjoyed my second book by Margaret Coel. She is a great mystery writer, weaving stories about the ordinary lives of Arapahos on the "rez" with darker themes. A white couple manage to buy a buffalo ranch and hire cowboys from an agency in town. Interestingly, all the men they hire are white (or Hispanic) and no9ne of them are local. This angers some of the Indian cowboys in the area and there is some activity geared to scaring them off. However, several of the cowboys from the ranch seem to have disappeared without a trace. Are the local Indians involved in the disappearances? Everything changes when a white buffalo calf is born. This is a good omen and its meaning to the Indian people is that the Creator is with them. Soon after that, the ranch owner, Carey, is shot and killed.Vicky and Father John work together to try to make sense of the strange happenings and locate the missing cowboys. The end is somewhat of a surprise. Very well written. Good dialogue, characters and suspense.I will look for more of these books!

  • DebA
    2019-03-09 03:22

    Wind River Reservation is having some problems. Lately, disappearing ranch hands and crimes are on the rise. What other problems will it face?Vicky Holden (Arapaho attorney) and Father John O'Malley (Catholic priest) are out investigating. They followed some leads which led them back to Carey’s Broken Buffalo Ranch. Are these coincidences?Spirit (white buffalo calf) was born on Carey’s Broken Buffalo Ranch. What other secret are they hiding?Beware! Lies and secrets are piling up. Dangerous times are among us. Be very careful! They will need to tell the difference from friend or enemies. Who can they trust?The full review can be found on the below URL:https://www.nightowlreviews.com/v5/Re...DebACopyright Night Owl Reviews

  • Lynne
    2019-03-14 06:14

    As I said in a previous Wind River Mystery -Killing Custer review, I very much enjoy Coel's series. This latest book was very good. I liked it better than Custer, perhaps because there was more about Native than in Custer which referenced a lot of history- some a bit repetitive. I appreciate how Coel includes vignettes of everyday life on the rez. The story of the white buffalo calf, a very special spiritual sign for Native Americans and many others, is one of many subtle but fascinating educational items Coel adds to her Wind River Mysteries. There is usually a surprise twist to the ending, but always believable. Intriguing and fun, I am sad when finishing one because I have to wait a year for the next one. That continued to be true with Night of the White Buffalo.

  • Bruce Snell
    2019-03-20 06:01

    Night of the White Buffalo is book number Eighteen in the Wind River series by Margaret Coel - 4 stars. A local rancher is killed just after a white buffalo calf is born on his ranch near the reservation. Six cowboys who had worked for him in the past year and a half are missing, and there have been several reports of shots fired at trucks driven by itinerant cowboys seeking work in the area. And through it all, Father O'Malley and lawyer Vickie Holden attempt to solve the murders and figure out what is happening and why.Although this book is not quite as compelling as the last three releases from Ms Coel, it is still better than almost everything else available, and will leave me waiting anxiously for the next book in the series.

  • Diana
    2019-02-25 09:57

    Father O'Malley has someone come into the confessional and tell him that he has killed someone. Father O[Malley tries to reason with the man, but the man leaves the confessional and disappears. No one is ever found murdered.A couple of cowboys from far away places that came to Wyoming to work on ranches and are not heard from again.There is a privately owned buffalo ranch in the middle of the reservation. A white baby buffalo is born. It is such a special birth that people come from all over to see it. The owner of the ranch is murdered in his truck.Father O'Malley and attorney, Vicki Holden, again work to solve these mysteries. They make such a great team !

  • Betty
    2019-03-12 03:52

    Scared White Buffalo Calf Born On The ReservationThe Wind River Series has long been my favorite Native American story. I am delighted to read this book. Visiting with Father John and Vicky Holden was a great way to pass the time. Someone is taking random shots at cars on the highway. Vicky and Adam to stop to help and find a dead man. About the same time a white buffalo calf is born on the reservation. The Arapahoe believe the white calf is scared and that it a sign thecreator is with. Hoards descend on ranch to see the calf. Several cowboys who work on the ranch has disappeared. The subplots are skillfully merged together.

  • Eve
    2019-02-27 04:01

    The beginning of the story was captivating...a confession of murder by someone Father O'Malley did not recognize. And the last few pages held "all" the action, and the middle of the book was just plain boring. No action. No suspense. Nothing really to hold a readers attention. The most believable character is Arnie who is trapped by his alcoholism and poverty which depicts the all too real situation that exists on Indian Reservations today. Also, the references to Vicky and Adam's relationship were much too vague...I wanted more in depth information rather than two different careers that did not coincide or contribute to a successful relationship.

  • Toni Kania
    2019-03-14 07:04

    I wish there was some way for the author to find a way for Father John, priest of the mission on Wind River Indian Reservation in Wyoming, to be able to resolve the fatal attraction he has with Vicky Holden, Arapaho lawyer on the reservation, in some satisfactory way to all concerned, including we readers. While the books are always wonderfully written and plotted, and the locale and Indian traditions so intricately woven in, there is always this frustration with the unresolved attraction that draws these two together as friends and partners in crime solving that hangs over all of our heads by book's end. Sigh.

  • Lynne Pennington
    2019-03-10 04:21

    I like all of Coel's books, but this was one of my favorites. Maybe it was the whole concept of the white buffalo, since I am a great fan of buffalo. They are wild and you must be careful around them, and this book does make clear that ranching buffies is not like your average cattle ranch. The mystery is grand too, with a definite twist at the end. Vicky and the Father's relationship seems to have mellowed to something more comfortable for them both, a sterling friendship. As all of Coel's books, you can jump in anywhere in the series and not be lost.