Read Be More Chill by Ned Vizzini Online

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Jeremy Heere is your average high school dork. Day after day, he stares at beautiful Christine, the girl he can never have, and dryly notes the small humiliations that come his way. Until the day he learns about the "squip." A pill-sized supercomputer that you swallow, the squip is guaranteed to bring you whatever you most desire in life. By instructing him on everything fJeremy Heere is your average high school dork. Day after day, he stares at beautiful Christine, the girl he can never have, and dryly notes the small humiliations that come his way. Until the day he learns about the "squip." A pill-sized supercomputer that you swallow, the squip is guaranteed to bring you whatever you most desire in life. By instructing him on everything from what to wear, to how to talk and walk, the squip transforms Jeremy from Supergeek to superchic....

Title : Be More Chill
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780786809967
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 287 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Be More Chill Reviews

  • Grace (BURTSBOOKS)
    2018-11-18 17:51

    Be more chill is about high school junior Jeremy Heere and how he, in his most fragile desperate teenage state, spent 600 dollars on a supercomputer called the SQUIP that would teach him how to be cool…. or more appropriately chill. This book is the most over exaggerated high school cliché popularity satire I’ve ever had the pleasure of reading. It was so overdramatic it made it hilarious. The SQUIP was also a super interesting concept and Jeremy’s social awkwardness was hilarious to read about and his feelings of anxiety were relatable as heck. Solid book, entertaining enough, my only complaint was it ended too abruptly and I was expecting more. More character development, more meaning??? More consequences for Jeremy’s actions. All and all, a good book, nothing to rave about but also nothing to rant about. So, I’m calling this a success.

  • Gauri
    2018-12-01 15:08

    This is the most vile and terrible book I have read in a long, long while. I finished this in one day, not because it was engrossing, but the material presented in here was so shocking I needed to read until the end to make sure it wasn't a satire. The premise of this book is essentially that a high-school aged boy, Jeremy, who longs after a particular girl and has low self-esteem about his persona, comes across a small pill-sized supercomputer called a "squip" that can act as a instructional guide on how to behave and what to do to accomplish one's goals. Using this, he is able to be considered "cool" and be among other popular teenagers who he once admired. What is just terrible about this book is that the author portrays and discusses girls and women as objects. Jeremy intentionally engages in sexual and romantic relationships with girls that he is not interested in, in order to demonstrate his sexual activity and be praised and viewed highly for it among his peers. By doing this, he hopes to gain the favor of his crush who maintains a distance from him. The Squip instructs him in how to seduce these girls. He gives instructions such as "make traces along her back with your fingers" and other touching, which is generally okay, but becomes problematic when the author, Vizzini, writes every single girl to positively respond to these actions -- as if these are the "keys to success" with girls, and that every girl will accept this behavior towards them. The Squip, after an interaction with one girl says to Jeremy, "GOOD JOB. THAT'S THE WAY TO DO IT. NEVER EVER BE MEAN TO GIRLS, UNLESS THEY'RE UGLY. [...] SHE'LL TELL HER FRIENDS HOW GOOD YOU WERE AND WE CAN BUILD FROM THERE." (152) *Forgive the capitalization; that is how the book is actually stylized. There is also some lesson that the Squip gives him, instructing him that women and girls are attracted to pheromones. Once you get with a girl, other girls will come to you and want you. -- Again, this is terribly problematic, because it states that every girl will want to have sexual advances made towards her because of the boy's prolific history. Then the Squip gives this comment, "HOW DO YOU THINK GUYS WITH GIRLFRIENDS BECOME SO ATTRACTIVE TO OUTSIDE FEMALES THAT THEY'RE FORCED TO CHEAT WITH?" (155). Now, this is suggesting that there is justification in infidelity on the male's part because of females' "innate" attraction. Jeremy himself makes a comment later in the book to his crush, who was heartbroken about being cheated on by her ex-boyfriend, "I reassure, 'We're all dicks, if you give us the chance. We're just guys. We react to threats and rewards.'" (219). Another issue this book runs into is that though infidelity is dismissed when males commit it, girls are continuously and pervasively labeled "sluts" and "whores" and have every insult in the book thrown at them (by both girls and boys). "Jenna went into her thing about, 'Elizabeth let four guys do her on the bus' and I had the balls to say to her what I've always wanted to say, deadpan: 'Shut up, Jenna. We know Elizabeth is like your Spider-Slut alterego or something.'" (171). Every character in this book "slutshames" or shames girls for being sexually active or having multiple partners -- this is a serious matter. Another thing to note is that Jeremy's love interest is not as sexually active as other girls, and is often described to be different than the other girls he meets whom he respects very little, once again, enforcing the hypocritical view of sexuality between the genders. There are also other terrible things written: (1) Some boys in the book capture pictures of girls in sexual acts and post them online without them knowing. Vizzini writes no voice of moral conscience explaining that this is wrong; instead, his characters revel at the "opportunity".(2) A girl physically harms herself due to mental illness, but she is portrayed as a manic-pixie girl. The main character treats her with skepticism, and just says, "weird." (196)(3) When the main character hesitates to be in a sexual situation or start a relationship, the character is continually accused of being homosexual by the Squip. Also, the word "gay" is continually used as an insult, as a slur. At the end of the novel, as you might expect, the boy sheds the chip/pill from his system and feels regretful of his actions. However, this isn't brought on by the realization of his terrible treatment of girls or his old friends, but by a freak accident that injures his new friends. And, he regrets the decision of taking the chip because his crush ultimately rejects him. Thus, at the end of the novel, though the Squip is realized to be a bad and immoral influence on the main character, no comment is made whatsoever about his behavior with the female characters. Jeremy is just portrayed as a tragic hero. Here is why all of this is very, very bad, and I seriously think this book should not be praised or even really published: Boys, aged 12 - 17, some of whom might be reclusive or have low self-esteem, and have some of the desires that the main character initially did, might pick up this book. As they read, they'll believe: "I have to dress this way. I have to talk this way. If I say this, girls will like me and smile at me. But I have to say just the right thing. And, I should only pay attention or be nice to girls who I'm interested in, forget the others. The way to ultimately get the girl I want is to touch them this way and manipulate them in this way. They'll totally fall for it. And I'll get what I want (sexual favors)." This perpetuates misogyny, and this way of thinking puts many girls in danger. This is a very disgusting book. Reconsidering another book by this author I once read, It's Kind of a Funny Story, I realize that the two female characters that were love interests, were also portrayed with this misogynistic attitude. I shelved the book as a "Favorite" because he truly spoke well about depression, but how wrong he is about other issues makes my stomach churn. I will be editing my review for that book with respect to my thoughts this evening.

  • Jessica
    2018-12-05 16:04

    Ned is actually a good friend of mine - we briefly dated when I was a sophomore in college and we've remained friends (the book is dedicated in-part to me, in fact) - but I swear to God, I'd love Be More Chill even if I'd pulled it off a shelf. I really can't put it down; it's refreshing to read a young adult novel that's a quick read, but still a thought-provoking, laugh-out-loud funny one. His writing is so readable and fluid and his characters could walk off the page and fit in at any high school in America. Why didn't they give us books like this to read in high school?It's weird for me to read this book because the main character, Jeremy, I really think is based on Ned. Jeremy says things about himself that I have heard Ned Vizzini talk about or seen him do. Of course, the book is a little bit sci-fi, so heaps of it are made up, but this book is a quite memoir-eque fictional novel in that it seems to be how Ned has worked out his high school dorkiness and confusion and angst about not getting with girls. Good job, Ned. Sorry it took me two/three years to finally read it.

  • Carlos De Eguiluz
    2018-12-07 15:07

    3.75En un universo donde Eminem murió por causa de un accidente de Hockey, Jeremy Heere, un inseguro chico de preparatoria, lidia con la impopularidad que su día a día lo obliga a vivir. Lo único que nuestro protagonista quiere es ser "cool" y salir con la bella Christine, su compañera de clase y obra teatral, pero dado su estatus, le es imposible. En una serie de eventos, Jeremy encuentra la respuesta a todos sus problemas: "Squip", una microcomputadora en forma de pastilla que le abre las puertas a un mundo de infinitas posibilidades.El libro en esencia es brillante. El toque de Vizzini es sumamente notorio, y ese mismo lo vuelve una joya del fatídico humor que lo caracteriza.El mundo necesita más de Ned Vizzini, pero ya no hay más Ned Vizzini.

  • Helena Miller
    2018-11-13 14:58

    Wow. I cannot believe how much I wanted to like this book and how disappointed I was by how misogynistic it is! Misogynistic, by the way, technically means "hates women" and, while I don't think Ned Vizzini (or the protagonist, Jeremy) hates women, I think this book INCORRECTLY represents high school girls as complete idiots. He presents the idea that if a boy simply wears the right t-shirt and says two "correct" sentences then she will instantly become sexually and personally attracted to him. Really?!?!? REALLY?!?!? (Can you tell this book made me mad?!?) I really liked the premise of the book, and it seemed to be a fairly accurate portrayal of adolescence in many ways, but the way that girls are portrayed was just too flat, simple, demeaning and inaccurate for me to be able to recommend this book. Argh....

  • Erin
    2018-11-17 15:02

    Jeremy Heere is a typical high school geek. Unable to socialize with other people, he instead chooses to analyze their reactions to him, tallying up insults and laughter on self-made Humiliation Sheets.And he's damned tired of it.All Jeremy wants is to be Cool. He wants to rub shoulders with the Hottest Girls in School. But most of all, he wants the attention of Christine, a girl in his drama club who won his heart over.Jeremy doesn't think any of this is possible until he learns about the "squip." A supercomputer that is swallowed as a pill, the squip implants itself in the user's brain and gives that person instructions as to how to behave and how to reach their goals. Soon, Jeremy finds himself working out to become buff, socializing with people who used to make fun of him, and transitioning from geek to...Cool.But Jeremy never pauses to consider the fact that he is handing control over his life to the squip. The consequences of this may not be what he bargained for.This book was a laugh out loud funny approach to the social tug-of-war that is high school. Readers will want to slap Jeremy upside the head for some of his responses (or lack thereof - grow some stones, dude!), but Vizzini draws the book to an interesting - and unpredictable - end.

  • Erin
    2018-11-25 17:45

    So here’s the premise: teenage boy is awkward, nerdy, uncool. He hears about a pill, a “squip,” that is a microcomputer that will give him instructions on how to be cool (or “more chill”). He gets a squip, becomes cool, and eventually the squip fails - its technology isn’t perfect yet.You might have been thinking - wait, wait, as YAF shouldn’t this book have ended with the boy realizing he’s better off as himself, without the aid of a microcomputer telling him exactly what to say? No. No, that’s not the moral: the moral is wait to buy yourself the exact piece of technology that will make imperfect-you more perfect so that you might have money, friends, and sex.And the sex part? Apparently young women lack self-esteem to such an extraordinary degree that not only do they cut themselves while purging while gossiping about their slutty ex-best-friend, but they are also willing and committed to having sex with any man who might be interested. The only exception to this rule the young woman that our hero is in love with - and it turns out she’s “weird,” and hence “frigid.”This book shouldn’t be read by anyone, let alone a young adult trying to sort out how they might learn to be okay with their awkward weirdness, because the message? You’re not okay, and it’s not likely you’ll be okay unless you buy something really expensive and/or have sex with an self-loathing young woman. The book, as a result, both deeply disturbing and depressing. Maybe that’s how it is with kids these days? Nah. I think instead Vizzini might try being less chill, and instead he might try to be more responsible.

  • BookishBoy
    2018-11-16 15:40

    A great book with genius humor and unfortunately, a so-so ending that felt kinda rushed.Actual rating: 4.6 out of 5Buy, Borrow, or Bin Verdict: Buy

  • Kim
    2018-12-02 12:49

    Are you popular? Well, are you? Because, like, there's this pill. Yeah, it'll make you act, look, seem, sound, make, break, buy, sell, find, invent, STINK of coolness. And... get this, you'll be able to touch boobiesNawww, dawg! I ain't playin' ya! You won't need no frizzy black wig or alter ego! No beaded curtains or orange hair! ('cuse my Brady Bunch flashbacks... I'm showing my age, yo.)You just swallow this pill and then you like get this really hip computer chip embedded in your brain that tells you how to act and what to say and argues with you until you are da bomb. But, wait... are you really? I mean... do you really want to be THAT guy? Is stealing your mom's car and almost losing your nerdy, but wicked awesome, bff worth it? Will it really get you the girl of your dreams or just that hot chick that will go down on anyone? Who the fuck cares?I was hoping that this would break that formula. I was hoping that the attempts of hipness would be, idk, groundbreaking. I didn't want a freakin' modern day after school special. But, whatever.. I'm used to disappointment. If you want a slightly more original conspiracy based YA book about microchips, you might want to check out Feed.

  • Regan
    2018-11-27 16:08

    Not very impressed, sometimes being inside of a teenage boy's head is no fun at all.

  • Neil (or bleed)
    2018-11-21 20:07

    That was fun.

  • Sammy
    2018-11-29 17:45

    Imagine being controlled by a computer that talks in your head. Well you may think this is impossible, but somehow Jeremy manages to get this "computer" called a squip. Why? You ask. This so called computer gets you whatever you desire, at least that's what Jeremy thinks. "Going out. At least now i know which stage I'm up against. I'm getting prepped. I think I might have a shot," Jeremy says to himself. The only reason Jeremy is getting a squip is because of Christine. Be More Chill is the book that shows you the journey that Jeremy goes through.Jeremy, the protagonist is a normal high school nerd that goes through life being teased and writing it down on his humiliation sheet. He happens to like Christine, but the problem is that Christine is already going out with somebody and Christine herself is hard to get. Jeremy hears about squip, a pill-size supercomputer that you swallow and he gets it right away. The squip teaches him how to get girls, do his homework, and even helps him remember his shakespear lines. This supercomputer helps him change from the weirdest nerd in the school to the coolest kid in the school. But is the squip really as perfect as it seems? One thing that i really like about this book is that it has everything a teenager wants to read about. Well maybe this is true for all the boys. Girls can read it only if they don't get grossed out by the male sexual details inside. But still, who couldn't relate to Jeremy? Almost every high schooler has at least one crush and needs to find a way to get to their crush. They rely on advice. Who would have though that it would be a supercomputer that gives you all the advice you need? How unique is that? It is true, the computer does tell you everything you need.I recommend this book to anybody. This book tells how Jeremy goes through his journey and shows how the squip can benefit him and mess his life up. Too bad i can't tell you more. Well i got an advice! Go get this book right now!

  • Joost
    2018-12-03 14:53

    Zin in een hilarisch boek over een awkward nerd die populair kan worden? Lees dan Be More Chill van Ned Vizzini! http://nerdygeekyfanboy.com/recensie/...

  • Emily Ross
    2018-12-04 18:47

    I don’t know what to think about this book. I want to think positively about it because I really like the musical, but it’s so different and there are multiple issues with this book. It follows Jeremy who is in high school and has extremely low self esteem, and a massive crush on a girl called Christine.Why is Jeremy so mean to Michael? And why did Michael just accept all of Jeremy’s crap? At some point Jeremy should have realised that the Squip is just a piece of technology and Michael has been his best friend for many years and treating him like dirt is just going to make him leave. Of course, it’s all explained that Michael realised what was going on, and there were no hard feelings, but that just takes the onus off of Jeremy completely. Jeremy wasn’t a bystander, he chose to do what the Squip told him, but the book ends up treating him like he was a bystander.The interactions between Jeremy and the Squip concerning women is absolutely disgusting. It encourages cheating and the double standards concerning cheating; men are to be seen positively for cheating (Jake) and women who cheat are to be seen as “sluts” or “whores” (Elizabeth). This is demonstrated by every character in the book, except maybe Michael. In any case, the author writes every girl to be the same, and to respond to the same stimuli in exactly the same way which is just adding to the general idea that women are objects.The way that mental health is treated is abhorrent. When Jeremy encounters a girl who is possibly bulimic, and has mental health issues, he calls her “weird” and does nothing. The girl herself is never seen or mentioned again.Whenever Jeremy doesn’t want to do something sexual, he is referred to as gay by the Squip. This is further used as a general insult throughout the book.Jeremy himself doesn’t feel remorse for what he’s done with the Squip, only feeling sad that his crush rejected him, thus leading to the revealing of why he did what he did in the form of a book for Christine. If I were Christine reading this book, I’d reject Jeremy for his blatant misogyny and lack of interest and care in girls. It just feels like Jeremy aims for Christine because she’s the only one who refuses to have sex with him after the Squip “helps” him. The issue of being a bystander returns here. Jeremy himself is just an awful character.

  • Juli
    2018-11-24 18:40

    Okay, so I picked this up because it was on my kids' desk, I recognized the author's name and it is on my daughter's summer reading list... It is a compelling read, a bit disturbing (from a parent's point of view), sometimes humorous, and probably altogether true - except the part of the super-computer that is swallowed and mind controlled, of course (at least not in 2008). The story of the cool vs not cool in school is an old story played out everywhere, all the time in pop culture - the geeks/nerds/dweebs vs. the really cool/popular kids. I'm sure the angst felt by the outsiders as they are looking in is based on today's reality and I'm certain that if there was a 'cool super pill', everyone on the outside will be standing in line to get one. The observations of what the cool kids do, what the outsiders have to do to get in and stay in is very perceptive and if it weren't for the cool pill, this will probably be an ordinary 'coming of age' teen angst story. I would be offended by the language the kids use, the complete disrespect for private property and authority, and the very shallow behavior of seeking material goods and sex as an all-consuming passion, but like it or not, as a parent, I have to be aware that this is the world our kids live in today.... unfortunately

  • Cassandra
    2018-12-03 12:43

    3.5 Stars.Ned Vizzini some how managed to capture the horrors and benefits of extremely advanced technology all the way back in 2004. Pre iPhone. While the characters were not always like-able, or even minimally moral, they rang true for the authentic teenage voice. Originally, I only picked this up because I hoped to hear Will Connolly’s and George Salazar’s voices in my head for a few hours. I mean, c’mon; the musical is pretty grand.However, instead I got a profound outlook on technology, teenage peer pressure, and as always with Vizzini’s work (and a David Levithan afterword), a little insight into the human condition.Full review to come.

  • Alissa
    2018-11-15 16:10

    Please see my review of Be More Chill heere! (get it? haha!)

  • Cassi aka Snow White Haggard
    2018-11-10 15:04

    Be More Chill follows the story of Jeremy Heere, a dorky theater-nerd who seems to spend all his time looking at porn and masturbating (yep that's your hero folks!). After failing to woo his crush with chocolate, he hears rumors of a new technology called a "squip" a microcomputer that can make you cool or smarter or whatever you're lacking. After selling some of his aunt's beloved beanie babies, Jeremy gets a blackmarket squip.The squip changes his life--taking him from dud to stud in record time. Except, as the reader his newfound coolness just never translated.Be More Chill was a frustrating book to read. It was like the borderline dorky kid who tried way too hard to be cool. Sorry book you just aren't cool and trying this hard makes it even worse. Unfortunately this book tried so hard to be hip that it's already outdated. Written in 2004 with references to musicians and styles of the time. Part of me never quite believed the coolness the squib gave. Was an Eminem t-shirt really cool in 2004?One of the biggest problems with this novel is even though it's science-fiction, I complete disbelieve its science. Maybe I'm just clueless and a tiny consumable computer that speaks in your head is really technologically feasible. But I don't know--a computer that you eat and then somehow lodges itself in your brain? Is that really supposed to feel plausible? Also the book occasionally made the mistake of giving the computer near-humanity. At one point the computer actually apologized. How can a computer feel regret or sorrow?I know the author was young when he wrote this book. Yet this book doesn't feel in-touch with teenagers. It gets a little lifetime original movie at times. There's drugs, sex, parties and hip-hop! Oh my! The cool kids live such exciting and dangerous lives! Eh. I believe there's drinking and partying, but I think this book took it to an unnecessary melodramatic level.I also need to note that I didn't enjoy the depiction of girls in this book. They're never really developed. The main characters actually refers to a group of girls as "The Hot Girls" and they're never developed beyond their hotness and as tools for the now-cool Jeremy to make out with. I don't like it when stories use women as props to maneuver the main character around.

  • Cassi aka Snow White Haggard
    2018-11-25 16:46

    Be More Chill follows the story of Jeremy Heere, a dorky theater-nerd who seems to spend all his time looking at porn and masturbating (yep that's your hero folks!). After failing to woo his crush with chocolate, he hears rumors of a new technology called a "squip" a microcomputer that can make you cool or smarter or whatever you're lacking. After selling some of his aunt's beloved beanie babies, Jeremy gets a blackmarket squip.The squip changes his life--taking him from dud to stud in record time. Except, as the reader his newfound coolness just never translated.Be More Chill was a frustrating book to read. It was like the borderline dorky kid who tried way too hard to be cool. Sorry book you just aren't cool and trying this hard makes it even worse. Unfortunately this book tried so hard to be hip that it's already outdated. Written in 2004 with references to musicians and styles of the time. Part of me never quite believed the coolness the squib gave. Was an Eminem t-shirt really cool in 2004?One of the biggest problems with this novel is even though it's science-fiction, I complete disbelieve its science. Maybe I'm just clueless and a tiny consumable computer that speaks in your head is really technologically feasible. But I don't know--a computer that you eat and then somehow lodges itself in your brain? Is that really supposed to feel plausible? Also the book occasionally made the mistake of giving the computer near-humanity. At one point the computer actually apologized. How can a computer feel regret or sorrow?I know the author was young when he wrote this book. Yet this book doesn't feel in-touch with teenagers. It gets a little lifetime original movie at times. There's drugs, sex, parties and hip-hop! Oh my! The cool kids live such exciting and dangerous lives! Eh. I believe there's drinking and partying, but I think this book took it to an unnecessary melodramatic level.I also need to note that I didn't enjoy the depiction of girls in this book. They're never really developed. The main characters actually refers to a group of girls as "The Hot Girls" and they're never developed beyond their hotness and as tools for the now-cool Jeremy to make out with. I don't like it when stories use women as props to maneuver the main character around.

  • William Gowling
    2018-11-23 18:44

    ITS FROM JAPAN

  • Morgan F
    2018-11-13 15:46

    I was so eager to read this book because I loved Vizzini's novel It's Kind of a Funny Story, which I found to be both funny and perceptive. This book was more of it's immature little brother (although it technically is older). The concept of a geek swallowing a supercomputer to become Cool is an over-the-top twist to the classic "dweeb becomes cool" story that fodders so many high school rom-coms. And although the premise is funny and ridiculous, I was waiting for the book to become serious. It was often crude and bizarre, but it was never serious. I'm not a big fan of teenage-boy humor, either, so this book had very little to offer me. Overall, my experience with this book was very similar to my experience with The Deathday Letter. Both feature average teenage boys under bizarre circumstances, both feature narrators who are desperate to get laid, and both are annoying silly when I just want them to be serious. This book just wasn't for me. It wasn't bad, but if you are only ever going to read one Vizzini novel in your life, make it It's Kind of a Funny Story.

  • Nadia
    2018-11-27 18:51

    “See, because being Cool is obviously the most important thing on earth. It’s more important than getting a job, or having a girlfriend, or political power, or money, because all those things are predicated by Coolness. They happen because of it. They depend on it.”2 starsread full review here no synopsis because I was too lazy to write one - read the goodreads one The WritingThe writing style in this definitely helped develop Jeremy’s character – look using fancy words and fitting them into sentences may not seem like much, but Jeremy is literally the nerdiest nerd there is and I found it to be a very accurate representation of his character. As was the internal dialogue if I’m being completely honest. The internal dialogue was just too much for me – I couldn’t deal with all of that insane rambling on Jeremy’s part, although the SQUIP did make it interesting at some points.The Plot/PacingFor at least half of the book, I felt like there was no discernible plot at all – and I mean at all. All it felt like was a memoir of Jeremy’s, without anything abnormal happening in his life – besides the SQUIP, of course, but I kind of got used to that way too quickly. I did love all of the extra development we got with him as a character, though – but I’ll talk about that later. Another thing I had a problem with was that the plot was so very focused around relationships and “getting the girl” and it was just too one-dimensional in that sense for my taste. In addition, I found it to be lacking an intense climax, but that may just be because I had already listened to the musical and knew what was gonna happen, so I’ll let you be the judge of thatThe pacing was kind of a bit off at the beginning, but it evened itself out as the book went on and you know actually started being semi-okay.The CharactersI WANTED MORE DEVELOPMENT!! From all of them – I mean, you can fight me on this if you don’t feel the same way (feel free to come at me, guys) – but I didn’t feel like any of them were developed enough to be actual people. In addition, they were all pretty focused on relationships, too and I just found it kind of unrealistic that the only thing everyone in that high school would care about is getting into a good relationship. I mean, you can disagree, but I found it to be a very inaccurate portrayal of what goes on in a high schooler’s head.To ConcludeThe book was not good – the musical was great. If you want to get to experience the story I suggest the musical, although the book really does have a lot more detail in it than the musical does – which, I mean, it’s kind of understandable, but I found the musical’s execution of the story arch to be better and more satisfying than the book’s.~~~You know, this wasn't as good as the musical... But it was alright?? Full review to come (hopefully after I finish all of my other RTCs)

  • Catherine Smith
    2018-12-03 20:57

    I started reading this book because of the musical made after it. I was astonished at how different they were, but the book really was interesting. I definitely recommend this for more mature readers, because of some explicit content. Some people might have heard the music, become interested in reading the book, and be shocked at how different they are. I do think it’s a fun read. Honestly, there isn’t a lot of purpose in the story, but its enjoyable and pretty cool. The only thing I really despise is how sexist the book is. Girls are portrayed as stupid, except for one. It really has its ups and downs.

  • Brinkley L
    2018-12-06 20:05

    FOR ALL THE PEOPLE COMING TO READ THIS FROM LISTENING TO THE MUSICAL:Leave. This book will ruin the musical for you. This book is so much better than the musical ever will be. I can't even listen to the musical anymore.Other than the characters' names and a few of the same settings, the book and the musical are not the same whatsoever. Christine's character is completely changed. She is an absolute jerk, not a cinnamon bun. Rich is more likable, and we get to see more of him. Michael isn't some anxiety ridden, teary eyed kid after Jeremy ignores him. He goes and gets laid, then continues to hang out with Jeremy. The squip is absolutely incredible; funny and helpful at the same time. Not the terrible, "everything about you makes me wanna die" bad guy he was shown as in the musical. The three girls: Chloe, Brook, and Jenna? They hardly even know each other. They aren't friends. You'll never see them together. And there's so many other minor characters that just make the story more interesting that are completely left out in the musical. Nicole, Michael's girlfriend, Stephanie, etc.Don't even get my started on the ending. it was kind of unbearable to read, but the ending in the book and the ending in the musical are completely different. Of course, I won't spoil it, but you'll be surprised.So to the people who want to listen to the musical again, don't read this. It's way better than the musical, and you'll end up hating he knock off of Ned Vizzini's "Be More Chill".Rant over.

  • Jillian Matthews
    2018-12-07 16:48

    This is one of the most amazing books I have read in a very long time, I book puts you in a zone I have never felt before while reading any other book, It felt so real, even though none of it is.

  • Clay
    2018-11-18 15:46

    Be More Chill was an interesting novel. There were parts I liked, and parts I didn’t like about the story, writing, characters, events etc. So lets start with the stuff I didn’t like.One of the things that jumped out to me almost immediately upon reading it was some of the crazy verbs used for dialogue attribution. I recently finished Stephen King’s On Writing and one of the things he suggests that, as writers, that we never do, is to use superfluous adverbs when attributing dialoge. However, “Some writers try to evade the no-adverb rule by shooting the attribution verb full of steroids,” King writes. And that is exactly what Vizini does throughout the novel, leaving us with phrases like “I pontificate,” and “she chortles” which can be found on pages 50 and 51 respectively. King tells us “Don’t do these things. Please oh please.” and I have to agree with him. I don’t know any high school kid that would ever use those two verbs in speech or writing. So why use them in the novel? Vizini should have been able to unpack those verbs into context around the dialogue, so he could have told us without those crazy verbs.Next up is the actual story, which centers around Jeremy Heere. Jeremy supposedly leads a typical high school life, which is then injected with sex, drugs, lust and yearnings for new friends. While I agree with some of that stuff to some extent, I would have to argue that Jeremy’s life is pretty atypical of anything I encountered in High School. The pervasive mentions and allusions to sex, masturbation, and pornography leave me at a point where I don’t think that I would ever be able to recommend this book to any of my future students. While the overall theme of the book may tie the content together, I don’t think it is a big enough pay off to warrant exposing a bunch of 16 and 17 year olds to this kind of smut. Sure you can have your character have a sexual encounter, but I don’t think explaining every detail is necessary. We as readers have imaginations, let us use them every once in a while, that way you can get away with putting that stuff in books without actually putting that in there. (On a side note, the level of sexual interactions in ‘It’s Kind of a Funny Story were just right, toned down just enough for the reader.)The novel didn’t really get that interesting for me until part 2, and without giving too much away, that is where the action actually starts to climb, and stuff starts to happen. Up unto that point it is really just the establishment of Jeremy’s place in the social hierarchy of the school, which gets kind of boring.On to the good stuff.One of my favorite parts of Jeremy’s character was when he would say something, but then the dialogue attribution was something like “okay, I didn’t say that, I said this:” because when I read that I thought he was actually growing some balls to say what he thought, only to realize that he backed out. A problem that will be later remedied. But I thought that was well done, and when I was in the pace of reading I got fooled a few times until I came across that attribution.I also liked the dialogue between Jeremy and his squip. There was no need for quotations or new paragraphs and all that other baggage which dialogue brings. But, because his squip was like his second subconscious the small point caps really portrayed that nicely. The voice and tone of the squip was well done too. I like how Vizini threw in that the voice was Keanu Reeves, a voice that we should all be familiar with. With that name alone Vizini illustrated a huge amount of information about the squip’s voice; brevity, when required, is something I appreciate as a reader.Tossing in the Shakespeare play throughout the story was neat too. It gives readers slivers of knowledge about A Midsummer Night’s Dream, which they might not know anything about. It could also be a good transition into reading the actual play in the classroom.But, overall I am going to have to settle with a three of five stars. I enjoyed the story; the actual reading of it. But some parts were too distracting, or too unnecessary that those things detracted from this being a great book. It also had many similarities with M.T. Anderson’s Feed. I also feel like the ending was an afterthought, like Vizini got to the end of Be More Chill and tacked on that last section and did a few revisions in the body of the story. The ending was good, don’t get me wrong; just not enough to salvage the ship which was already over-perforated with holes.Is this something I would suggest to others to read? Sure, if you want to, and have no other books lined up.Is this a book that I would ever teach in a classroom? No, unfortunately.

  • Lucinda Garza
    2018-12-08 21:02

    Es más como 3.5 estrellas, creo que esperaba un poquito más...

  • Carrie G
    2018-11-10 15:41

    In “Be More Chill,” Jeremy Heere is an unpopular drama nerd who daily records the injustices he suffers on Humiliation Sheets. He’s never been to a party, never been to a dance, never been on a date, never been kissed… he virtually breaks out in hives just sitting next to a girl. When Jeremy thinks all hope of ever being Cool is lost, he learns about “squips.” A squip is a microscopic supercomputer that is swallowed. It then works its way into your brain and tells you how to walk, talk, and dress to be “the man”. Jeremy secretly buys himself a squip to win the heart of Christine – the girl he has had a crush on for years. After fixing Jeremy’s clothes, posture, and verbal language, and getting him kissed by two girls, the squip has come up with the ultimate plan to help Jeremy make Christine “his”… but can a computer REALLY know the way to a girl’s heart?What to say about this book?!? There are elements of the plot that are, quite obviously, implausible. For example, the squip… we all know that there aren’t computers you can swallow that will travel to your brain, read your mind, interface with other computers, and tell you step by step what to do. IMPOSSIBLE! However, the characters in this book are excellent! The main character, Jeremy, is believable. According to my hubby (who would theoretically know), Jeremy says and thinks the things that lots of teen boys think – about sex, girls, the purpose of the Internet, social injustices, parents, etc. He is a character that teen boys will easily relate to. From the female perspective, I think that Christine, Jeremy’s love interest, is also a very believable character (mildly impressive since this book was written by a guy). She is not willing to be used and then tossed aside; she wants a relationship based on honesty and shared interests with someone who is intelligent and caring. So, while the plot of this book is a stretch (some might even say completely far-fetched), it is funny and the book is filled with likeable, believable characters.My husband and I would give this book four out of five stars. He took away one star because he hates the ending of the book. I took away one star because parts of the book are just too juvenile and crass for my female sensibilities. However, this book is funny, unique, and, in parts, shockingly honest. I would recommend this book to both high school boys and girls. In a lot of ways, this book reminded me of “Girl Parts” by John Cusick. So, if you read that book and liked it, “Be More Chill” is perfect for you!

  • Bella
    2018-12-10 13:45

    This book was a rollercoaster of emotions, drama, and angst, but I loved it. I read this book in less than a day and staying up to 1AM just to finish. Jeremy and Michael are the outcasts of their high school- on the outside always looking in. At the same time, you can relate to them with at least one thing. Jeremy and Michael are such unique characters which made this story great. The ending was amazing so stay tuned for that...Theater Nerds/Fans of the Musical like me:This book is VERY different than the musical, so don't expect it to be the same. Personally, I liked the book better than the musical. But Ned Vizzini's legacy lives on with the new production of Be More Chill. What is a legacy? It's planting seeds in a garden that you never get to see....

  • Carter Mooney
    2018-11-16 14:05

    Be More Chill, by Ned Vizzini Is one of the best books I have ever read. The author does a great job at exposing teen life in its most real forms. It really is a great read for all. The Book is great read for all young adults and teens. The reason it is so great for teens and young adults is because most of them can relate to the story. At one point or another in life we have all felt out of place or unwanted: dorky. We all want a find a way out no matter what, instead of means that can be used to us today the main character Jeremy Heere uses the Squip. The Squip is a mini supercomputer which can activate parts of your brain to make you a way more cool and awesome individual. This book is a great and vivid portrayal of modern day high-school. Be More Chill uses great references to the separations between cliques and the scrutiny placed on each by opposing groups. The Cliques most shown in this book are the ones you might expect the ‘nerds’ (Band Geeks, Theatre Kids), and the ‘Jocks’. The conflicts between these two opposing groups is great, because it really shows the ‘nerd’ is jealous and willing to try to reach the top of the popularity poll. The vivid exposé of high school drama and conflicts is great for parents of children in high-school, so they can understand what it really is like to be a secondary student nowadays. That is why I recommend this book for parents as well. The references to teenage life continue with the internal struggle of depression, and fitting in. Jeremy Heere wants to fit in, but never can. He tries everything to get noticed, like participating in theater. I have definitely felt the effects of feeling a little low in my life , and could really connect with this book. I really loved Be More Chill. It really is one of the best books I have ever read. Between the contrasts to real life, and the added bonus of a fictional remedy, I could really connect to this story. Great job Ned Vizzini. I give this book four and a half stars!