Read The Glory of the Trenches by Coningsby Dawson Online

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Coningsby Dawson (1883-1959) was an Anglo-American author, born at High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England. He graduated at Merton College, Oxford, in 1905 and in the same year went to America, where he did special work for English newspapers on Canadian subjects, travelling widely during the period. He lived at Taunton, Massachusetts, from 1906 to 1910, when he became liteConingsby Dawson (1883-1959) was an Anglo-American author, born at High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England. He graduated at Merton College, Oxford, in 1905 and in the same year went to America, where he did special work for English newspapers on Canadian subjects, travelling widely during the period. He lived at Taunton, Massachusetts, from 1906 to 1910, when he became literary adviser to the George H. Doran Publishing Company. In 1919, he went to England to study European reconstruction problems, and subsequently lectured on the subject of the United States. He also visited and reported on the devastated regions of Central and Eastern Europe at the request of Herbert Hoover. He also edited, with his father W. J. Dawson, The Reader's Library, and Best Short Stories (1923). His other works include The Worker and Other Poems (1906), The House of Weeping Women (1908), Murder Point (1910), Carry On (1917), The Glory of the Trenches (1918), Out to Win (1918), The Test of Scarlet (1919), The Little House (1920), It Might Have Happened to You (1921), and Christmas Outside Eden (1922)....

Title : The Glory of the Trenches
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781406936841
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 58 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Glory of the Trenches Reviews

  • Eric Peterson
    2019-03-07 04:33

    Truly excellent. A must read.

  • Steelwhisper
    2019-03-15 06:37

    This was hard to finish. Where the author recounts simple and basic things and puts aside his almost fanatic pro-war propaganda, this account is quite readable and imparts a few worthwhile insights.But the rest is barely bearable to take in and reminded me a lot of fascist texts of the same era also written by participants in the Great War. In a way it explains how so shortly after the first there could be a second war, given such tendencies. What shocked me most was the complete lack of insight into what was taking place with and within the invalids of the Great War. Even for someone not remotely knowledgeable about repression, peer pressure or PTSD it should be clear what was being done to those men. Many other accounts of the war and the time right after show us men galore who were absolutely aware of the fact that their (continued) suffering was being swept under the rug, that society turned away from them, negated them and often even locked them up behind the conveniently closed doors of eugenics-influenced institutions. Great Britain was the one participant in the Great War completely failing to have a public discourse and acknowledgement of the injuries done to its soldiers. Which resulted, almost needless to say, not just in men suffering severely from PTSD well into their old age, but men denied a true sense of being home and so many being done out of pensions, too incapacitated by the "get on with it" and peer-enforced gaiety to even fight for them.To see this glorified with Christian zealotry in full brunt leaves an impressively bad after-taste, especially when compared to such insightful and self-analytical books like George Scott Atkinson's A Soldier's Diary. Written by another British participant, in the same time frame, it shows remarkably modern insights into what went on around him even while in the trenches. His distaste of how the public treated the veterans along with his own inability to own up to his feelings in direct communication is a striking closure of that account. Juxtaposing the two explains not just my loathing for Dawson's book, but also for his attempted manipulation of the reader, which he and his father even owned up to.

  • Jesse
    2019-03-16 06:44

    A controversial and defiant book. While certainly driven by ideology and unorthodox thinking, it contains many great truths and insights about the spiritual, unseen aspects of war: sacrifice, brotherhood, courage, acceptance of impending death and giving up the self for a higher purpose. Much of this book will be difficult for civilians to comprehend, and the author says as much. Furthermore, the religious envelope in which it is delivered may turn some away, but the contents of said envelope are universal. It is a unique view on war, and sometimes hard for the reader to accept with 98 years to look back on. Some have called this book war propaganda, and even if that is the case, propaganda can nonetheless contain truths, which this book certainly does. Read this book for what it is: a former seminary student turned Artillery Officer interpreting the battlefield spiritually, and attempting to extract beauty and meaning from the most horrific war in human history. A tall order to be sure, and be you inspired or disturbed, there are lessons to be learned from this book. The author writes quite beautifully as well. His goal is to convince the reader that there is redemption in suffering, light from darkness and glory in the trenches. Not glory in the way normally associated with war, but an unconsciously religious, spiritual glory.

  • Keith MacKinnon
    2019-03-18 08:01

    This is a short, first hand account of one man’s experience in the first World War. The world that he experienced was made vivid by his descriptive narrative of his journey from peacetime in the US to a hospital bed in England via France. Dawson really does think there is glory in the trenches, though. He views those that go to battle with an “Onward Christian Soldiers” attitude that becomes quite preachy and religious in the last bit of the book. I disagree with his worldview and some of his reasoning but his story is compelling and worth reading.