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At the height of the Jazz Age, Ring Lardner was America’s most beloved humorist, equally admired by a popular audience and by literary friends like F. Scott Fitzgerald and Edmund Wilson. A sports writer who became a sensation with his comic baseball bestseller, You Know Me Al, Lardner had a rare gift for inspired nonsense and an ear attuned to the rhythms and hilarious oddAt the height of the Jazz Age, Ring Lardner was America’s most beloved humorist, equally admired by a popular audience and by literary friends like F. Scott Fitzgerald and Edmund Wilson. A sports writer who became a sensation with his comic baseball bestseller, You Know Me Al, Lardner had a rare gift for inspired nonsense and an ear attuned to the rhythms and hilarious oddities of American speech. He was also a sharp and dispassionate observer of the American scene. His best stories—among them such masterpieces as “Haircut,” “The Golden Honeymoon,” “A Caddy’s Diary,” and “The Love Nest”—cast a devastating eye on the hypocrisies, prejudices, and petty scheming of everyday life. In this Library of America edition, editor Ian Frazier surveys the whole sweep of Lardner’s talents, offering contemporary readers his finest stories, the full texts of You Know Me Al, The Big Town, and the long out-of-print The Real Dope, and a generous sampling of his humor pieces, sports reporting, song lyrics, and surrealist playlets....

Title : Ring Lardner: Stories & Other Writings
Author :
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ISBN : 9781598532531
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 974 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Ring Lardner: Stories & Other Writings Reviews

  • Tony
    2019-01-30 07:36

    RING LARDNER: Stories & Other Writings. (2013). ****.Aside from having bumped into a short story or two in one anthology or another, I haven’t read any significant amount of Lardner’s work. His forte, for most of his works during the 1920s, was the short story, but a big portion of his love was allocated to music lyrics and to plays. This volume was a recent production of The Library of America, edited by Ian Frazier – one of my favorite contemporary humorists. He has done a fine job of choosing those works of Lardner that best define his career as a writer. Lardner’s breakthrough work was a collection of his short stories that had originally appeared in The Saturday Evening Post. Entitled: “You Know Me As: A Busher’s Letters.” These were stories told from the vantage of a baseball player in the minor leagues who had recently been moved to one of the majors. The humor was typical of the times – cute spellings of words, misuse of words themselves, and the intrusion of slang popular at the time. If published today, the stories would have gone over like a lead balloon. A selection of some other of his short stories in this collection make up for any shortfalls in these baseball tales. Two of them are great: “Haircut,” and “Mr. and Mrs. Fixit.” You should also read on and take a look at his short plays that are included. These were not plays that were produced, but pastiches of short plays that mock long ones. They are actually funny! In all, this is a great introduction to the works of Lardner, and another great addition to this publisher’s series. Recommended.

  • Alan
    2019-02-07 02:00

    Are you lost daddy I arsked tenderly.Shut up he explained.—The Young Immigrunts, Chapter 10 (p.332)The sardonic wit of Ringgold Wilmer Lardner (quite a mouthful—no wonder he shortened it to "Ring") was often cloaked in this kind of vernacular from a faux-naïve narrator. The memorable exchange above is actually what triggered my interest in Stories & Other Writings when I saw this collection on the shelf—I've been using the father's line myself for years, knew it was Lardner's, but never knew exactly where it came from.Ring Lardner was an enormously popular American humorist and sports writer in the early 20th Century. Something like a cross between Groucho Marx and Thorne Smith, Lardner wrote on topics as varied as baseball, travel, New York City, marriage, World War I, and Prohibition. His attitude toward Prohibition, in particular, was like Thorne Smith's, both cynical and defiant.Lardner's work was often episodic or epistolary—the first part of the volume at hand, for example, is You Know Me Al—A Busher's Letters, comprising a bush-league baseball player's letters to a friend back home, after his move up to the major-league Chicago White Sox. These turn out to be a good introduction to Lardner's work... breezy and not at all literary in tone (almost illiterate sometimes, in fact), their protagonist oblivious to his teammates' teasing as well as to the consequences of his own financial and romantic misapprehensions.The other characters who appear in Lardner's fiction may be better able to handle English grammar, but they're usually just as blithely unaware of much that the reader sees. It's all part of the fun.One thing that wasn't as much fun: Lardner's casual use of racist terms—noticeable even for that time and place—seems to have been part of his own character, not just of his creations. But apart from such occasional landmines of prose, it's still possible to enjoy Lardner's work as it was written.This collection is rounded out with song lyrics, short plays (unproduceable ones—one instructs that the curtain be "lowered for seven days to denote the lapse of a week"!) and letters Lardner wrote to correspondents like Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald.As is typical with Library of America editions, the scholarly additions—such as extensive notes on the text, and a timeline of Lardner's life—provide substantial context for the author's own work. The Library of America has turned out to be a real gold mine for me in general... and I have hundreds of titles in the series yet to explore.

  • Mills College Library
    2019-02-04 04:43

    Fiction L321s 2013

  • Steve Shilstone
    2019-02-01 02:49

    Includes You Know Me Al, the best baseball book ever wroten.