Read The New York Times Book of Mathematics: More Than 100 Years of Writing by the Numbers by Gina Kolata Paul Hoffman Online

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From the archives of the world's most famous newspaper comes a collection of its very best writing on mathematics. Big and informative, "The New York Times Book of Mathematics" gathers more than 110 articles written from 1892 to 2010 that cover statistics, coincidences, chaos theory, famous problems, cryptography, computers, and many other topics. Edited by Pulitzer PrizeFrom the archives of the world's most famous newspaper comes a collection of its very best writing on mathematics. Big and informative, "The New York Times Book of Mathematics" gathers more than 110 articles written from 1892 to 2010 that cover statistics, coincidences, chaos theory, famous problems, cryptography, computers, and many other topics. Edited by Pulitzer Prize finalist and senior "Times" writer Gina Kolata, and featuring renowned contributors such as James Gleick, William L. Laurence, Malcolm W. Browne, George Johnson, and John Markoff, it's a must-have for any math and science enthusiast!...

Title : The New York Times Book of Mathematics: More Than 100 Years of Writing by the Numbers
Author :
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ISBN : 9781402793288
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 496 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The New York Times Book of Mathematics: More Than 100 Years of Writing by the Numbers Reviews

  • Joshua
    2019-03-24 10:33

    A quick read about stories in mathematics history, discovery and mathematicians you probably already knew from some other sources. Nevertheless, a great pastime, and it sometimes does have some first-time information.

  • Missy
    2019-03-20 10:31

    Disclaimer: The extent of my high school math was geometry. In college, my mathematics credit was in “Math for Poets.” I count on my fingers. Yet for some reason, I find higher level mathematics fascinating. It’s mysterious and incomprehensible and magical. Combine the arcane world of higher mathematics with the crisp writing of the New York Times, and you have a winner of a book. The Book of Mathematics chronicles changes in theory and practice over the past 100 years, a time of tremendous change in industrialization, communication, and computation. An article from 1892, reports on a meeting of the Society of Actuaries, introducing readers to “the men who figure business by algebra.” You can read articles 10 years apart -- 1986 and 1996 -- demonstrating the transition in mathematicians’ attitudes about computers. According the earlier article by James Gleick, computers count while mathematicians think. A decade later, Gina Kolata writes about the possibility of computers becoming “as agile at reasoning as they are at calculating.” The Book of Mathematics is a joy to dip into; a visit to world of people (and machines) who think big and strange thoughts, explained and made understandable by gifted journalists.

  • Jo
    2019-03-09 10:53

    I am still currently reading this book.. I happened upon it why just scanning the New book shelf at my local library.. It was the Saturday before Labor day, and my local library was to be closed Sunday and Monday, so I wanted to get something different out to read. No, I am not a Math Wiz, nor do I want to sound like I am being so important that I am trying to impress you with my math literacy.. Its just that these days, with computers taking up so much of our lives, and being so intricately involved in our day to day affairs( try job searching without a computer. Impossible) that math skills are more important than ever.I have mentioned on my Facebook page that couponing is like algebra in a way. You are trying to reach zero sum, and you have to do equations, trying to get as much as you can, for the least you can..Math to me is cold, but a blanket cold. Practical and always there.

  • Jonita Pauley
    2019-03-21 08:38

    I really don't know what the purpose of this book was supposed to be. I assumed (wrongly) from the title "Mathematics", it had something to do with math. Maybe even the evolution of math. Perhaps some mathematical concepts? Perhaps since it said "100 years of writing about the numbers" it would have been about math in the media--maybe the perception of math in mainstream media/culture? Mathematicians? Affects of math? Anything math-y?But no. It was rather snippets of articles from 100 years. It would be better described as "We found a file full of old articles on math and crammed them in a book, and published them in no particular order with no particular theme."It had so much potential, but no. Just no. Save your $30, Google "Mathematics" and read the first 100 hits you get--it's pretty much the same experience. As my dissertation advisor would have said "I stopped reading on page 10, you can do better than this- try again."

  • Terry Freedman
    2019-02-25 11:39

    Not an obvious choice for Computing teachers, you might think, a book on mathematics. But this one is fascinating because there are sections on cryptography and computing, as well as odd chapters on interesting topics like random numbers and electronics.The subtitle of the book is More than 100 years of writing by the numbers. In other words, this is a collection of articles taken from the New York Times over the last 100 years. It's readable for non-mathematicians (well, mostly), and gives you a great historical perspective of how computing – and thinking about computing – has developed over that time.

  • Tom
    2019-02-28 09:39

    As originally published, many of the collected essays were reasonably interesting. As collected however, they frequently overlap, with great redundancy, provoking a lot more skimming than a winning book should.Beyond this basic structural nuisance, I kept feeling surprised how little math is included. The book reads more like a who's who along with the names of their accomplishments, with very little math content most of the time. I wasn't prepared to handle a math textbook, but somehow expected more substantive content.

  • Cook Memorial Public Library
    2019-03-13 13:55

    A 2013 staff nonfiction favorite recommended by staffer Melissa. Read her review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...Check our catalog: http://encore.cooklib.org/iii/encore/...

  • Walter
    2019-03-23 08:52

    Good collection of essays ranging for number theory, to probability, chaos theory, cryptology, and much more.The only downside that I can think of is that if you've read some math in the past, you're bound to find many of the essays repetitive (there's more than a couple dealing with Fermat's Last Theorem) which is sort of like watching a movie you already know the ending to.

  • John Ambrose
    2019-03-16 11:37

    Very enjoyable collection of essays for the math-literate reader. I especially enjoyed the essay on the Monty Hall Problem, the series about Fermat's Last Theorem, and the section on chaos. The book also does a great job bringing the personalities of the great mathematicians of the 20th Century to life, especially Paul Erdos.

  • Leland William
    2019-02-26 12:43

    A silly book. While individual pieces of this collection stand out as good journalism, the collection as a whole stinks. There is repetition in subjects covered, and much of the content in this collection is too simplified to be interesting. I'm not sure what I was expecting out of this thing, but it did not impress.

  • Peter Mcloughlin
    2019-03-03 08:49

    Some interesting articles but the problem of a collection of newspaper articles is they are too short to due their topic justice. It is a good collection for someone not familiar with mathematics but I've seen most of this stuff before. It might be interesting to newcomer to math.

  • Cynthia
    2019-02-23 13:49

    I wanted something more in-depth, and while the writing was accessible, it wasn't challenging and didn't offer enough examples.