Read Shadewright by Dean McMillin Online

shadewright

From the author of WHITE FIRE WAR: A unique gothic fantasy epic begins here … Born with grey skin the color of lake clay, Phantist is an outcast from birth, shunned by the other children in the Orphan Asylum where he is raised. Then, during a solar eclipse, he witnesses a magnificent performance by Lasander Shadowmaster--a shadewright, sculptor of shadows. When Phantist diFrom the author of WHITE FIRE WAR: A unique gothic fantasy epic begins here … Born with grey skin the color of lake clay, Phantist is an outcast from birth, shunned by the other children in the Orphan Asylum where he is raised. Then, during a solar eclipse, he witnesses a magnificent performance by Lasander Shadowmaster--a shadewright, sculptor of shadows. When Phantist discovers that Lasander is a fellow greyskin, he finds his goal: he will become a Shadowmaster himself. His dream is to make an entire city hold its breath as his idol Lasander has done.This quest leads him to the isolated village of Half Oak, where a strange cult holds sway, worshipping a voice in the earth: the Earth Darkness. The cult’s leader relays a deadly prophecy from his god-master:“Everything you care about will be destroyed, greyskin. Everything and everyone. And it is all because of you. He wants you to know that. Because of YOU.”Soon, Phantist is drawn into a web of plots and ambitions. He finds allies: Despanya, a greyskin who has forsaken shadow-sculpting to become a soldier; and Arick, a yellow-skinned master of lightning power whose childish nature belies dangerous abilities. But the ever-present threat of Earth Darkness pursues them across the countryside. The very ground beneath their feet turns against them ...In the end, Phantist will face a grim choice that will determine the course of his life, and the fate of his world....

Title : Shadewright
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 17279827
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 214 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Shadewright Reviews

  • Sadie Forsythe
    2018-12-03 02:41

    3.5I was basically enjoying this. The writing is perfectly readable, though the editing starts to crumble a little after the halfway mark. (It's noticeable, but not problematic.) And I'd probably give Arick a star or two all his own. He's adorable, feels Asperger's/Autistic-like. I even like that the main character has a tendency to be petty and proud. It's annoying to read but he has flaws, which is so much better than a perfect Marty Stu.However, I say, 'was basically enjoying' instead of 'enjoyed' because the plot barely gets started and then the book ends on a cliffhanger. While I assume the events leading up to Phantist's quest aren't random, they kind of feel like they are. He wandered into a random town, is picked out by a random enemy and randomly decides to be the hero. Maybe the next book will pull it more clearly together.I will be reading the next, Shadowslave. The writing is good enough, the characters interesting enough and I'm curious how it will end. But I also have a sneaky suspicious it won't actually end. We'll see.

  • Sabrina Devonshire
    2018-12-11 02:39

    After devouring White Fire War, I was eager to read another book by this author. This book is written in the first person point of view, following the young "gray skin," Phantist. An orphan outcast, he aspires to be a Shadowmaster and travels the country, trying to master his skills of shaping shadows and picks up two other friends, also outcasts - a fellow gray skin, Despanya, who gave up shadow-shaping to become a soldier and Arick, a master of lightning power, who often turns people away with his childish and autistic-like personality.Their journey is fraught with surprises as the young Phantist learns to master his abilities, experiences his first experiences with sexual attraction, and faces dark forces deep in the earth. I found the young Phantist a very likeable character that I wanted to follow and the book is full of vivid, rich descriptions, which bring this fantasy world to life. I'm ready to immerse myself in the second volume.

  • Slawek
    2018-11-22 19:21

    It deserves solid 3 but I had a problem with this book from about midway point. That said, this is the first book I have finished in some time and I enjoyed it much more than some other books by well known and celebrated authors. Firstly, the good bits. The language and the way the author writes is what drew me into this book and kept me at it. I only hope that with time his style and most importantly, stories, will only get better - we will have someone really great with bright future.Now, the bad bits, as in my opinion what would improve this book.Story itself, for one. For a short book like this one, too much was happening and all of it felt quite forced. Especially at the very end when we jumped straight from the main character riding to an army camp to that character already out and about seeking the lost town. A lot of stuff was introduced to the reader (cars, flying machines, guns etc.) but very little explained how it was making any sense. I still do not know how much of a wonder those cars where. On one hand I got an impression that they are a rare thing. On the other hand, the author makes them sound like perhaps not such a head turner. And how is that Despanya, without any prior experience, jumps in and simply drives it? Moments like this really let this book down.Finally, the main character. I still cannot decide whether I care about him or not. I was expecting to male up my mind by the end of the book bit I still cannot. There is just not enough to maker care. On the positive note it would probably not take much for this to change for the better. I guess with the story being so rushed there was not much space left for the author to 'tend to' his Phantist.All in all, I would recommend to read it but I will not be reading the next part. However, I will certainly revisit in few years time with much hope to read a new fantastic book.

  • Brian McKinley
    2018-12-02 19:32

    After reading "Shadows Hold Their Breath" by Dean C. McMillin and loving it, I was really excited to see a series continuing the story! As it turns out, while this does take place in the same fantastical world as the short story, it is evidently some years later and the short story protagonist Lasander has grown and developed quite a large reputation, but is not the focal character.Instead, we are introduced to a new grey-skinned protagonist named Phantist, who grows up in an orphanage and worships Lasander as a hero from afar. After getting used to the character, I have to say that I really warmed to Phantist and the odd collection of misfit friends he gains in his travels. Things begin to take on an ominous tone after a while and, what starts out seeming like a boy's quest to master his abilities tale takes on a much larger scale! To say that this book gives a fully-defined and strikingly original fantasy world would not do justice to how vivid and wonderful McMillan's creations are! I've read a number of fantasy novels and, while I normally gravitate toward things like Martin's "Song of Ice and Fire," I'm so glad that I gave this one a try!The world setting is as unique as I've come across and truly feels like its own land rather than another Tolkein-esque world or Dungeons and Dragons type Europe: it's a strange blending of an almost fairytale land with steampunk incursions from the technologically-based country to the north. The same is true of the characters: all distinct and clearly drawn with no stock fantasy figures to be found. McMillan's mastery of voice and naturalistic dialogue make this a pleasurable read that, like his "White Fire War" has no profanity or strong sexual content, making it appealing to all ages!I highly recommend this book and its sequel, both of which I read straight through over a weekend!

  • Brian McKinley
    2018-11-28 02:30

    After reading "Shadows Hold Their Breath" by Dean C. McMillin and loving it, I was really excited to see a series continuing the story! As it turns out, while this does take place in the same fantastical world as the short story, it is evidently some years later and the short story protagonist Lasander has grown and developed quite a large reputation, but is not the focal character.Instead, we are introduced to a new grey-skinned protagonist named Phantist, who grows up in an orphanage and worships Lasander as a hero from afar. After getting used to the character, I have to say that I really warmed to Phantist and the odd collection of misfit friends he gains in his travels. Things begin to take on an ominous tone after a while and, what starts out seeming like a boy's quest to master his abilities tale takes on a much larger scale! To say that this book gives a fully-defined and strikingly original fantasy world would not do justice to how vivid and wonderful McMillan's creations are! I've read a number of fantasy novels and, while I normally gravitate toward things like Martin's "Song of Ice and Fire," I'm so glad that I gave this one a try!The world setting is as unique as I've come across and truly feels like its own land rather than another Tolkein-esque world or Dungeons and Dragons type Europe: it's a strange blending of an almost fairytale land with steampunk incursions from the technologically-based country to the north. The same is true of the characters: all distinct and clearly drawn with no stock fantasy figures to be found. McMillan's mastery of voice and naturalistic dialogue make this a pleasurable read that, like his "White Fire War" has no profanity or strong sexual content, making it appealing to all ages!I highly recommend this book and its sequel, both of which I read straight through over a weekend!

  • Nancy
    2018-11-18 21:42

    Too many inappropriate and unnecessary comments.