Read A Pembrokeshire Childhood in the 1950s. by Phil Carradice by Phil Carradice Online

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As the author says in this hugely entertaining and evocative book 'the memories of childhood have no order'. What they do have, however, is a resonance and an ability to quicken the heart beat and transport you back to a time when all the world was young and free and intriguing. Phil Carradice's account of growing up in Pembrokeshire in the years after the Second War is onAs the author says in this hugely entertaining and evocative book 'the memories of childhood have no order'. What they do have, however, is a resonance and an ability to quicken the heart beat and transport you back to a time when all the world was young and free and intriguing. Phil Carradice's account of growing up in Pembrokeshire in the years after the Second War is one of adventure and discovery - all while bordered by a warm and loving family that provide the security needed to grow and test the limits imposed by society. In many respects the childhood and adolescence described here are no different from many others - look at them in another way and they are a unique and fascinating period, caught in a time long gone and a way of life that is now as distant as the moon. Pembroke Dock was a wonderful combination of rural and urban living. It offered an amazing range of experiences....

Title : A Pembrokeshire Childhood in the 1950s. by Phil Carradice
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ISBN : 9781445613116
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 128 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

A Pembrokeshire Childhood in the 1950s. by Phil Carradice Reviews

  • KJ
    2019-01-30 16:08

    Words cannot adequately express how much I enjoyed reading this memoir of Phil Carradice's childhood in Pembrokeshire because I, too, was born there. While Carradice grew up in Pembroke Dock in the 1950s, I hail from its sister town of Pembroke and attended primary school there in the 1960s, but many similarities remain. In fact Phil's father, Jack, had the dubious pleasure of being my extremely non-artistic late father's art teacher at one point.Carradice does a brilliant job of portraying a beautiful and idiosyncratic part of Britain when it was still considered remote – even by Welsh standards. Of course, these days the extended M4 and other road improvements have made an enormous difference and now minor celebrities maintain second homes in places such as Tenby. In the 1950s and 1960s, however, it was a very different proposition and the change from childhood to adolescence meant a sudden switch from, “This is paradise!” to, “This place really is at the end of the world and we need to get out!”All of the greatest hits are here, from the best places to hang out (in Pembroke Dock Monti's, the quintessentially Italian café and in Pembroke, Brown's where the best fish and chips were available – AND they had a Gaggia!) to the local characters. For instance, Carradice name checks his headmaster, T.C. Roberts, known to several generations of schoolboys as Phant, short for Phantom Pig and inspired by Roberts's rotund figure and habit of appearing unexpectedly when the boys were up to no good. My father and his friends, however, preferred to call Roberts Top Cat, it being rumoured that his initials meant that he shared a name with the cartoon character!Mostly what stood out for me was the Pembrokeshire humour and, despite being Scottish, Carradice Senior appears to have adopted this very eagerly. Following an incident in which one of Carradice Junior's friends accidentally defenestrated the lower part of his body, he gave him the nickname Windows Howells. Most of my grandfather's friends also had unfathomable nicknames that dated to some incident or other that was never repeated but nonetheless were attached to them for life from that moment on.Admittedly I am probably biased, but this is a very engaging, amusing and sometimes touching account of a childhood and adolescence spent in a wonderful place and time. We were very lucky to have experienced it.