Read Stealing First in a Two-Team Town: The White Sox from Comiskey to Reinsdorf by Richard C. Lindberg Online

stealing-first-in-a-two-team-town-the-white-sox-from-comiskey-to-reinsdorf

A unique account of the Chicago White Sox from the earliest days of the team's founding in 1900 by Charles Comiskey through the triumphant 1990s. Major events in White Sox history, including the Black Sox scandal, the Go-Go glory days, and the fight for a new stadium to replace Comiskey Park in the 1980s, are framed around a broader discussion of the team's inability to coA unique account of the Chicago White Sox from the earliest days of the team's founding in 1900 by Charles Comiskey through the triumphant 1990s. Major events in White Sox history, including the Black Sox scandal, the Go-Go glory days, and the fight for a new stadium to replace Comiskey Park in the 1980s, are framed around a broader discussion of the team's inability to compete with the powerful cross-town Chicago Cubs in a media market that has relegated the South Side ballclub to secondary status....

Title : Stealing First in a Two-Team Town: The White Sox from Comiskey to Reinsdorf
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780915611935
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 304 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Stealing First in a Two-Team Town: The White Sox from Comiskey to Reinsdorf Reviews

  • Mickey Mantle
    2019-03-23 05:58

    Admittedly, this book would appeal to a small audience, Chicago White Sox devotees. I have been with the author a few times. When I picked up this book, I expected a lot of editorial comment and pro White Sox Management propaganda. I was pleasantly surprised by the LACK of editorial comment. The book was published in 1994. It is a well researched magnificent history of the Chicago White Sox with a focus on the deterioration of Comiskey Park and the political machinations that took place in building a new State funded ballpark for the White Sox.Obviously, the economic times have changed greatly since 1994, and the idea of taxpayer money being used to build stadiums for billionaires who are paying ballplayers millions of dollars while schools and infrastructure are ignored is finally being scrutinized and frowned upon, but the optimism of the author about the project at the time the book was written is perfectly understandable.This is a fabulous history. Pure Chicago. A must read for a Sox Fan.