Read The Language of Inquiry by Lyn Hejinian Online

the-language-of-inquiry

Lyn Hejinian is among the most prominent of contemporary American poets. Her autobiographical poem My Life, a best-selling book of innovative American poetry, has garnered accolades and fans inside and outside academia. The Language of Inquiry is a comprehensive and wonderfully readable collection of her essays, and its publication promises to be an important event for AmeLyn Hejinian is among the most prominent of contemporary American poets. Her autobiographical poem My Life, a best-selling book of innovative American poetry, has garnered accolades and fans inside and outside academia. The Language of Inquiry is a comprehensive and wonderfully readable collection of her essays, and its publication promises to be an important event for American literary culture. Here, Hejinian brings together twenty essays written over a span of almost twenty-five years. Like many of the Language Poets with whom she has been associated since the mid-1970s, Hejinian turns to language as a social space, a site of both philosophical inquiry and political address.Central to these essays are the themes of time and knowledge, consciousness and perception. Hejinian's interests cover a range of texts and figures. Prominent among them are Sir Francis Bacon and Enlightenment-era explorers; Faust and Sheherazade; Viktor Shklovsky and Russian formalism; William James, Hannah Arendt, and Martin Heidegger. But perhaps the most important literary presence in the essays is Gertrude Stein; the volume includes Hejinian's influential "Two Stein Talks," as well as two more recent essays on Stein's writings....

Title : The Language of Inquiry
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780520217003
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 447 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Language of Inquiry Reviews

  • Rodney
    2019-03-11 04:25

    Language is the system that makes the world perceptible to us, but also perpetually divides us from it. Hejinian’s work grows out from that paradox; it’s distinguished by its unusual degree of sympathy for the propositions on either side of the comma. You get the same sense reading these talks and essays that you do from much of Hejinian’s poetry: that she revels in the pleasures of syntactical shapeliness, enumeration, and the self that’s assembled in the act of arranging sentences, while at the same time acknowledging, even celebrating, how little grammar’s able to tame the multitudinous reality it orders and names. The politics implicit in her work enters in its resistance to fixed order and final closure, that dream only language extends; the personal comes through in her grasp of how anxious and powerless an ‘I’ and ‘we’ would be—how bereft of relations with others or the world—without its organizing power. At the same time, language itself is a thing in the world, with ‘of’ and ‘besides’ as real as factories or trees, so Stein trumps Zola in the Realism department, and ostranenie turns out to be the shortest route to the “certain uncertainty” of locating ourselves in the flux of the everyday.

  • Dennis
    2019-03-06 10:33

    A wonderful collection of essays about language poetry--non-closure.

  • Marissa Perel
    2019-03-23 09:21

    I have only read parts of this but plan to read it all - so far profound

  • Andrew
    2019-02-24 03:24

    Author influenced Naja Marie Aidt in Best European Fiction 2010

  • Adam
    2019-03-23 08:30

    Fav