Read Big-Bore Revolvers by Marko Radielovic Max Prasac Online

big-bore-revolvers

Is bigger better? You bet it is, when it's a big-bore revolver!Big-Bore Revolvers offers a one-stop resource for the wheelgun novice to the hardened sixgun veteran. With in-depth coverage of commercial and wildcat calibers and their effectiveness, theoretical and actual application of terminal ballistics and a detailed look at today's available revolver platforms, this isIs bigger better? You bet it is, when it's a big-bore revolver!Big-Bore Revolvers offers a one-stop resource for the wheelgun novice to the hardened sixgun veteran. With in-depth coverage of commercial and wildcat calibers and their effectiveness, theoretical and actual application of terminal ballistics and a detailed look at today's available revolver platforms, this is the most comprehensive book ever published on the topic.One-stop resource about big-bore revolversComprehensive look at dozens of oversized cartridges, their designers and ballisticsDetailed descriptions of the power-house revolvers that can handle big-bore loadsMore than 250 full-color photos, highlighting cartridge comparisons and revolversBig and dangerous game and the revolvers needed to take them on!With a special look at the pioneers behind the big-bore revolution, and hunt stories as giant as the guns and cartridges themselves, Big-Bore Revolvers is one book every handgun hunter will want to read cover to cover. Authored by big-bore revolver aficionado Max Prasac, and with collaboration from John Parker and Jack Huntington, two of the most authoritative names in big-bore revolver circles, this compendium of facts, history and first-hand experiences behind the sights fills a long-vacant niche....

Title : Big-Bore Revolvers
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781440228568
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 224 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Big-Bore Revolvers Reviews

  • John Jeffcoat iii
    2019-03-09 07:52

    This book really helped me to understand an appreciate the world of large caliber revolver handguns. My interest is not in hunting (an activity confined to the grocery store for me), but rather in home-defense. I realize that puts me in a small minority of people who would buy and read this book... a book targeted primarily at hunters. I do own a number of semi-automatic handguns for home-defense, but only one revolver - a .357 magnum - and I've had my concealed carry permit for 15 years... but I have recently begun to re-think the idea that having a large number of rounds available in the magazine is a key factor in choosing a handgun for home-defense.The Glock .40 semi-auto has always been my favorite, and the choice of most law enforcement members, with an impressive 15 + 1 round capacity. But realistically I've been thinking: "Which is more important when the bad guy is breaking down the front door... to have the ability to fire 15 times with a .40 to .45 caliber SHORT bullet designed for semi-auto loading? ... OR... to have the ability to fire only 6 times... but with WIDE AND LONG Magnum-style bullets designed for large-bore revolvers that will deliver 3 to 4 times to stopping power?"The odds of me needing more than 1 to 3 shots in a home-defense situation are, statistically, very slim... so why not make those shots count? Of course, it is not necessary to step-up to one of those ridiculously large .50 caliber hand-cannons that are used to hunt buffalo and elephant. Such rounds inflict such a severe recoil upon the shooter that quickly re-acquiring the target for a second shot (only needed if the first shot was not well-placed) would be challenging... and the level of noise generated would require using hearing protection... which might not be a realistically assured prerequisite for the shooter in a home-defense scenario.Instead, I am talking about stepping up to one of the more reasonably-sized large-bore revolvers, such as the classic .44 Magnum, or the slightly more powerful and newer (but much less widely available in terms of both gun and ammo) .48 Ruger. Such revolvers are more realistic choices for home-defense, and can be more realistically expect to stop an intruder with ONE well-placed shot... while a .40 semi-auto might require two to three or more shots to have the same stopping-power effect. One thing I gained a better understanding of from reading this book, is that the diameter of the bullet (the caliber) is NOT always the key factor in a bullet's stopping power. For example, the slightly smaller-diameter .46 S & W is FAR more powerful than the slightly larger-diameter .48 Ruger... because the .46 is a much longer cartridge with far more powder behind it, accelerating it to far greater velocity that the slightly fatter .48 Ruger. This principle is also why the long .454 Casull is such a very powerful and hard-hitting round. The caliber / diameter at "only" .454 is scarcely larger than that of a .45 ACP semi-auto bullet... but it moves at more than THREE TIMES the velocity of the .45 ACP... and the bullet has great length (greater overall mass). In fact the .454 Cassul is arguably a more powerful round that the larger-diameter .48 Ruger for these same reasons.After reading this book, I have decided that the huge and long .50, and the huge & long .475 Linebaugh, and really even the long and powerful .454 Cassul are just too much gun for me (too much recoil, too much noise) for a home-defense scenario. The more entry-level members of the "Big Bore Club"... the classic .44 Magnum, or at the most the not-so-long (same length as a .44 magnum cartridge) but fatter .48 Ruger ... are the only two choices I would consider for home defense. Their more reasonable levels of recoil and noise would better enable me to line it up quickly for a second shot, should that prove to be necessary.Besides, if a huge 1,200-pound hungry black bear can manage to get in the elevator and make its way up to my seventh-floor condo, and break down my door to eat me... I think I would die of shock that he accomplished this impressive feat before I could fire the first round. I'm more concerned with 200 pound predators, than with 1,200 pound predators. A .44 magnum should be sufficient to take them out with just a shot ... or two.

  • Jennifer L.S. Pearsall
    2019-03-25 07:48

    I had a ball editing this book. One of my very first handguns was a revolver, a snobby S&W Model 686. That gun was just a "measly" .357 Magnum, and while I've always regretted selling it, it wasn't until I read Max Prasac's book "Big-Bore Revolvers" that I yearned for that one back and wanted to call up every custom revolver maker out there and order a safe full of big-bores. (Note: The author listed here is Marko Radielovic, but he usually works under the pen name Max Prasac, and that's the name used to author this book). Max's passion for anything bigger than a .44 Magnum and that gets housed in a revolver is undeniable--you can truly feel his love for these guns, his appreciation for the power and ingenuity behind the cartridges, and his respect for the men behind the designs of both gun and ammunition.Whether you've only ever owned mainstream revolvers for target shooting or self-protection, whether you've always wanted to dabble in hunting with a handgun, or even if you've never owned a revolver before, one read through this book and a glance at the fabulous photography will have you calling up one of the many custom gunmaker's highlighted in this book and ordering your own big-bore revolver.