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The true story, drawn from official documents and hours of personal interviews, of how Newfoundland and Labrador joined Confederation and became Canada's tenth province in 1949. A rich cast of characters--hailing from Britain, America, Canada and Newfoundland--battle it out for the prize of the resource-rich, financially solvent, militarily strategic island. The twists andThe true story, drawn from official documents and hours of personal interviews, of how Newfoundland and Labrador joined Confederation and became Canada's tenth province in 1949. A rich cast of characters--hailing from Britain, America, Canada and Newfoundland--battle it out for the prize of the resource-rich, financially solvent, militarily strategic island. The twists and turns are as dramatic as any spy novel and extremely surprising, since the "official" version of Newfoundland history has held for over fifty years almost without question. Don't Tell the Newfoundlanders will change all that....

Title : Don't Tell the Newfoundlanders: The True Story of Newfoundland's Confederation with Canada
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780307401335
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 352 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Don't Tell the Newfoundlanders: The True Story of Newfoundland's Confederation with Canada Reviews

  • Caren
    2018-11-12 07:14

    After taking our daughter to Newfoundland to attend school, I became interested in the island's history. This book is a bit dry, with lots of primary source quotations, but the story itself is pretty eye-opening. First of all, early in the Depression years, Great Britain took over running the island because the Newfoundlanders had gotten themselves into so much debt (much of it fighting for the Brits in WWI). Now that alone is kind of incredible. I mean, that would sort of be like Germany taking over Greece right now. Really?? Then, after WWII, Britain connived with Canada to make sure Newfoundland became their newest province. Apparently one motivation was to keep it from becoming another state in the good old USA. There is plenty of intrigue here. It is enough to make you very angry at the way bigger more powerful countries manipulate smaller ones. The Newfoundlanders were some of the nicest people I have ever met (seriously nice!!), so it does kind of get your dander up to hear how they were treated.

  • Jacqueline
    2018-11-04 07:27

    Brilliant. A must read for any Newfoundlander or Canadian to truly understand what happened and why Newfoundland joined confederation with Canada and why it is still and will probably remain a sore topic for Newfoundlanders. I would like to thank Greg Malone for sharing James T. Halley's lifetime of work to get the truth out through primary sources. Extremely well-researched, providing a clear understanding of what the British and Canadian really thought and some cases still do think of Newfoundlanders.

  • EP
    2018-11-04 08:27

    I wish my father had lived to read this book. He told us the stories and what people thought or knew happened but seeing it documented is unreal. Every son and daughter of Newfoundland ought to read this.

  • Matthew
    2018-11-07 09:26

    This should be mandatory reading in school. A fascinating and terrible part of our history. You'll shake your head in disbelief.

  • Teghan
    2018-11-22 06:20

    I picked this up as an interest read - I've always had a love for Canadian history. Incredibly well researched and the academic in me was really pleased with the amount of primary sources included as well as 1/3 of the book being endnotes and appendixes. There's a great overview of the real story of Newfoundland's entry into confederation and the author does a great job utilizing his own research as well as that of his late colleague.I found it a very accessible to read, so people who are curious about the topic but might not have any background in history or academia will find this book very comfortable to read. But readers well versed will enjoy it as well. The only critique I can offer is that I would have enjoyed a bit more critical analysis to go alongside the documents.

  • Orla Hegarty
    2018-11-21 04:35

    This book should be mandatory reading for anyone interested in the (modern-day) history of the colonization of Canada.Before I moved to Newfoundland I used to say that Newfoundland was Canada's best kept secret. This book details exactly how true that sentiment was - and not in the way I originally intended it.

  • Ammar
    2018-10-23 03:27

    A must read to anyone who is interested in knowing about the events and back room deals that happened between Canada and Great Britain regarding the 'confederation' between Newfoundland and Canada. As Greg Malone writes to him it feels like Canada occupied Newfoundland.... Enough said

  • Kyla Squires
    2018-10-25 08:18

    Makes you really angry.

  • Maria
    2018-10-27 03:38

    Every Newfoundlander should read this book!

  • Candice Walsh
    2018-10-22 05:35

    A heavy read that'll leave your blood boiling.

  • Gord Jones
    2018-11-03 07:30

    I never really thought much of how Newfoundland came into Confederation, except that they held a vote, becoming a province of Canada won and on March 31 (my birthday) 1949, they became the countries 10th province. Don't Tell the Newfoundlanders tells the true story of how Newfoundland came to join Confederation.The true story, drawn from official documents and hours of personal interviews, of how Newfoundland and Labrador joined Confederation and became Canada''s tenth province in 1949. A rich cast of characters--hailing from Britain, America, Canada and Newfoundland--battle it out for the prize of the resource-rich, financially solvent, militarily strategic island. The twists and turns are as dramatic as any spy novel and extremely surprising, since the "official" version of Newfoundland history has held for over fifty years almost without question. Don''t Tell the Newfoundlanders will change all that.This is a fascinating book about the years of wheeling and dealing between Great Britain and Canada about how to move Newfoundland into Canada. The title of the book says it all. All the dealing between the two countries was done without Newfoundlands knowledge, in behind closed door meetings and top secret communications. Entire communications of these top secret documents are used in the telling of this story. It surprised me how many letters started with the words "Top Secret".Although it had it's own government during the 1800's, Newfoundland was still considered a colony of Great Britain. In 1907 Newfoundland was granted Dominion status. Due to a severe debt load caused by loans taken during World War 1 to fight for the British Empire and the world wide great depression, Great Britain made a deal to extend credit to Newfoundland on the basis that Newfoundland would lose it's government and control over it's own destiny and once again become a colony of Great Britain.The people of Newfoundland lost their power to vote and had to depend solely on the decisions made by a "Commission of Government" and it's governor, solely appointed by Britain.From 1933 till the moment in 1949 that it came into Canada, there were no elections in Newfoundland. Don't Tell the Newfoundlanders tells the story of how both England and Canada used this lake of government to their advantage to come to a great deal for both countries and a bad one for Newfoundland.I know Newfoundland has had a raw deal in many areas with Canada. It's Hydro deal with Quebec and Canada's supporting Quebec in this has always rubbed me wrong, but the end of the book tells much more.The last chapters deal with the vote itself in Newfoundland's referendum to bring Newfoundland into confederation or to bring back responsible government. Confederation won by a narrow 52% to 48% margin, but the author, Greg Malone, puts forth a case that the vote not only was rigged but responsible government actually won and the people were lied to. This part was a little too "conspiracy theory" for me, but he makes not too bad of a case.This is a very interesting book that I learned a lot from. it's definitely worth a read, and should be mandatory reading for Newfoundlanders and their descendants.

  • Ronald Kelland
    2018-11-15 09:35

    This book as eagerly anticipated and I was thrilled when it arrived as a Christmas present. Unfortunately, the overall impression after reading it is a bit of a disappointment. The thesis that British and Canadian officials and politicians colluded to force Newfoundland into Confederation is not a new one, other historians have written on the matter. Malone does bring a convincing number of primarily sources that make me more convinced that the sordid affair did happen. I have no argument with Malone's thesis or his proving of it. The book falls on other points, namely it could have used a better editor, one with experience with history books. Many of the primary sources, letters, meeting minute entries, etc., are cited in their entirety, which interrupts the flow of the narrative. A better and more skilled approach would have been to discuss those sources and only directly cite the relevant excerpts from them. The other failing of the book is its unfailing belief in "all that is Newfoundland is good." Malone contends that Newfoundland was well governed before the place went bankrupt during the Depression, a statement that is simply not true. Newfoundland and was practically alone on honouring its war debts, but successive 1930s governments had proven to be incredibly inept, corrupt and self-interested. Malone also contends that Newfoundland would have been able to survive as an independent nation following the Second World War, which I also take issue with. Newfoundland ended the war with a substantial surplus, untold iron ore and hydro potential in Labrador and its traditional fisheries. Despite all of this Newfoundland would still have lacked the capital and ability to exploit many of those resources, would its isolation would have still made transmission of hydropower difficult and still beholden to Canada and Quebec. There is nothing to suggest that Newfoundland would have managed the fishery any better than Canada did - successive Newfoundland governments had proven to be unwilling or unable to manage the fishery in decades past, in fact most management was spectacularly bad resulting in a loss of confidence in Newfoundland fishery products in Newfoundland's traditional customers. The fact is that as difficult as times have been for Newfoundland, it has likely enjoyed a much higher standard of living under Confederation than it would have on its own. It burns a little to say that, but I am totally convinced it is true nonetheless. Although I agree with Malone that the methods used to trick or force Newfoundland into Confederation was disgraceful and more than a little likely illegal and unconstitutional, but I will not argue with the end results more that 60 years later.I am glad that I read this book and I am happy to add it to my Newfoundlandia collection. I also think other Canadians and Newfoundlanders should read it. Flawed though it is, it is an essential contribution to the historiography.

  • Joseph
    2018-11-12 10:12

    This is an amazing story about how Newfoundland was stripped of its autonomy by the United Kingdom at the very time that the U.K. and its allies were preaching the principle of self-determination. The book does a good job of describing the machinations between British officials and the Dominion of Canada -- much of it driven by concerns around war debts and natural resources -- culminating in a rigged two-stage referendum and subsequent negotiation process that completely cut out the voices of Newfoundlanders in setting the terms of confederation.I found this to be an eerily timely tale, given the upheaval and debates around the recent Brexit vote.While the narrative itself was engaging, I have to mark the book down for a surfeit of long direct quotes that rendered the flow a little choppy.

  • Tony Desantis
    2018-11-04 05:36

    Now I undersand the underlying tensions between Newfoundlanders (I'll never call them Newfies again) and other Canadians. As the author says "I went to Toronto a Canadian and came back to St. John's a Newfoundlander". Imagine a self-governing commonwealth having an elected legislature since 1832 being turned back into a British colony, then being shoved into Confederation through backroom deals between Ottawa and the Foreign Office in London. And Newfoundland and Labrador's first Premier Joey Smallwood being in the thick of it.

  • Julian
    2018-11-18 05:20

    I think, first of all, that this book is terribly important, at least to anyone from Newfoundland or within its sphere of influence. The truth about confederation has long been suspected, but this book makes it abundantly clear what a travesty it was.So, why a three-star rating? Well, the book is quite short, and largely consists of verbatim quotes from classified telegrams; both of these aspects are virtues, but I might have enjoyed a different treatment better.

  • Rachel
    2018-10-22 10:21

    Very interesting read about Newfoundland's entry into Canada, the general gist of which I knew (that Newfoundlanders generally weren't happy about it), but the details were much more than I realized. I'm very curious how people feel now - do they still wish Newfoundland hadn't become part of Canada? Do they think they would be better off as an independant country? Do they still wish they'd joined with the States? Or is the residual unhappiness mostly still about how it all went down?

  • Paula Hayden
    2018-11-20 09:27

    This book captured the "distance" that still exists between NL and Canada. Not being totally familiar with all the characters involved, the read was sometimes tedious and hard to follow. Regardless, the shocking (well, not so much shocking as typical) attitudes and realities around Confederation explained a lot about how NL has developed (or not) as a province of Canada. Strengthened my own sense of being a Newfoundlander rather than a Canadian.

  • Paul Childs
    2018-10-27 04:19

    Serious need for an editor; a potentially really good book that raises important questions about how Newfoundland and Labrador were brought into Confederation. But; too much verbatim from government documents, too much repetition, not nearly enough analysis, and needs a 'so what/what do we do about it' conclusion. More's the pity, it's a story that needs to be told.

  • Christopher Myrick
    2018-11-18 11:13

    A well done polemic work. well researched... for the most part. The "conspiracy" is there: UK and Canada did conspire to bring Newfoundland into the Dominion. But the last chapters are speculative. Rigging the referendum is probable. The idea that NF would have prospered under independence is wishful thinking. Not impossible, but highly unlikely.

  • Lillian
    2018-11-04 04:36

    interesting information. I know understand why a lot of Newfoundlanders - call the mainland "Canada" as if we are separate. good to know how Newfoundland became part of Canada - not sure if it was a good move at the time or not.

  • Jbondandrews
    2018-10-26 05:26

    An interesting book about Newfoundland's entry into Canada as the tenth province. I always knew that the British and Canadians had been underhanded in their activities regarding Newfoundland.

  • Noelle Walsh
    2018-10-23 04:22

    Every Newfoundlander and Canadian as should read this book. I believe it should be mandatory reading in order to understand this very sore part of our history. It is a must read book.

  • Jessica
    2018-11-07 09:11

    An amazing read - historical facts uncovered and easily read like fiction. A must read for any Newfoundlander.