Read Homies and Hermanos: God and Gangs in Central America by Robert Brenneman Online

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Why would a gun-wielding, tattoo-bearing "homie" trade in la vida loca for a Bible and the buttoned-down lifestyle of an evangelical hermano (brother in Christ)? To answer this question, Robert Brenneman interviewed sixty-three former gang members from the "Northern Triangle" of Central America--Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras--most of whom left their gang for evangelWhy would a gun-wielding, tattoo-bearing "homie" trade in la vida loca for a Bible and the buttoned-down lifestyle of an evangelical hermano (brother in Christ)? To answer this question, Robert Brenneman interviewed sixty-three former gang members from the "Northern Triangle" of Central America--Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras--most of whom left their gang for evangelicalism. Unlike in the United States, membership in a Central American gang is hasta la morgue. But the most common exception to the "morgue rule" is that of conversion or regular participation in an evangelical church. Do gang members who weary of their dangerous lifestyle simply make a rational choice to opt for evangelical religion? Brenneman finds this is only partly the case, for many others report emotional conversions that came unexpectedly, when they found themselves overwhelmed by a sermon, a conversation, or a prayer service. An extensively researched and gritty account, Homies and Hermanos sheds light on the nature of youth violence, of religious conversion, and of evangelical churches in Central America....

Title : Homies and Hermanos: God and Gangs in Central America
Author :
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ISBN : 9780199753
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 294 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Homies and Hermanos: God and Gangs in Central America Reviews

  • Ally
    2019-01-19 16:35

    Reads academically, dissertation turned book. Interesting, not a topic you daily hear a lot about.

  • Tim Hoiland
    2019-02-11 21:32

    I’ve been thinking of the many books I’ve read over the years having to do with Guatemala, remembering all they’ve taught me about the land where I was born, a country I’m even still getting to know. If for one reason or another you’re interested in learning more about Guatemala – say, because you know next to nothing about it or because you’re headed there on a summer mission trip or because you’re curious where that fair trade coffee you’re enjoying came from – below are five books I’d recommend getting and reading...- See more at: http://tjhoiland.com/wordpress/2013/0...

  • John
    2019-01-28 20:13

    This book about gangs in Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador is fascinating and I highly recommend it. Although there are no gangs very active here in western Honduras, I found his analysis of the factors leading to entrance into gangs extremely helpful in thinking about ministry to young people.In addition to the factors of poverty, family problems, and difficulties in school. Brenneman adds "shame." Because of their situations some young people experience a profound sense of shame - especially apparent in a society with extreme inequity. I would add that in Honduras there is the added shame of being poor and being despised by the economic and political elites, one of whom openly called them "gente del monte" - hill-billies.Brenneman was especially interested in a phenomenon in some gangs where members are "allowed" to leave the gangs if they convert to "evangelical" Protestantism. the dynamic is interesting, including how the "conversion experience" is often experienced in one's whole person, in one's body. I will refer back to this book in the next year while the parish where I serve renews its work with young people - and perhaps also with violence prevention. The need to undercut the culture of shame is something I want to think about and investigate.

  • KatieYaeger Rotramel
    2019-02-01 22:28

    Great insight to youth and gangs in Central America and is very easily digestible, even for the non-academic reader (or non-religious reader). A must-read for anyone working in youth development work in Central America!